Rocket Group – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 17:46:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png Rocket Group – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 Application Lifecycle Management Market Size, Scope and Forecast https://stlouisrocketry.org/application-lifecycle-management-market-size-scope-and-forecast/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 17:46:04 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/application-lifecycle-management-market-size-scope-and-forecast/ New Jersey, United States – This Application Lifecycle Management Market the research examines the status and future prospects of the Application Lifecycle Management market from the perspective of competitors, regions, products, and applications/end industries. The global Application Lifecycle Management market is segmented by products and applications/end industries in this analysis, which also analyzes the various […]]]>

New Jersey, United States – This Application Lifecycle Management Market the research examines the status and future prospects of the Application Lifecycle Management market from the perspective of competitors, regions, products, and applications/end industries. The global Application Lifecycle Management market is segmented by products and applications/end industries in this analysis, which also analyzes the various players in global and key regions.

Application Lifecycle Management market analysis is included in this report in its entirety. In-depth secondary research, primary interviews, and internal expert reviews have been incorporated into the Application Lifecycle Management report market estimates. These market estimations have been considered by researching the effects of different social, political, and economic aspects, as well as current market dynamics, on the growth of the Application Lifecycle Management market.

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Key Players Mentioned in the Application Lifecycle Management Market Research Report:

Micro Focus, Broadcom, Atlassian, Microsoft, IBM, Intland, Collabnet, Digite, Rocket Software, Jama Software.

Porter’s Five Forces Analysis, which explains the five forces: the bargaining power of the customer, the bargaining power of the distributor, the threat of substitute products, and the degree of competition in the life cycle management market of applications, is included in the report along with the market overview, which includes market dynamics. It describes the various players that make up the market ecosystem, including system integrators, intermediaries, and end users. The competitive environment of the Application Lifecycle Management market is another major topic of the report. For better decision-making, the research also provides in-depth details of the COVID-19 scenario and its influence on the market.

Application Lifecycle Management Market Segmentation:

Application Lifecycle Management Market, By Solution

• Software
• Services

Application Lifecycle Management Market, By Platform

• Web apps
• Mobile apps

Application Lifecycle Management Market, By Industry

• Banking, financial services and insurance
• Telecom and IT
• Media and entertainment
• Retail and e-commerce
• Others

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Scope of the Application Lifecycle Management Market Report

ATTRIBUTES DETAILS
ESTIMATED YEAR 2022
YEAR OF REFERENCE 2021
FORECAST YEAR 2029
HISTORICAL YEAR 2020
UNITY Value (million USD/billion)
SECTORS COVERED Types, applications, end users, and more.
REPORT COVER Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
BY REGION North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
CUSTOMIZATION SCOPE Free report customization (equivalent to up to 4 analyst business days) with purchase. Added or changed country, region and segment scope.

Answers to key questions in the report:

1. Who are the top five Application Lifecycle Management market players?

2. How will the application lifecycle management market develop in the next five years?

3. Which products and applications will occupy the lion’s share of the application lifecycle management market?

4. What are the Application Lifecycle Management Market drivers and restraints?

5. Which regional market will show the strongest growth?

6. What will be the CAGR and size of the Application Lifecycle Management market through the forecast period?

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NASA Introduces the 2022 Flight Director Class – Check Out the 7 New Additions to the Team https://stlouisrocketry.org/nasa-introduces-the-2022-flight-director-class-check-out-the-7-new-additions-to-the-team/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 00:46:21 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/nasa-introduces-the-2022-flight-director-class-check-out-the-7-new-additions-to-the-team/ Overview of the space station flight control room in Johnson Space Center’s Mission Control Center as flight controllers support rendezvous and docking operations of the Soyuz TMA spacecraft -04M. Credit: NASA Nasa selected seven new members of the flight director team to oversee International Space Station operations, commercial crew and Artemis missions to the Moon. […]]]>

Overview of the space station flight control room in Johnson Space Center’s Mission Control Center as flight controllers support rendezvous and docking operations of the Soyuz TMA spacecraft -04M. Credit: NASA

Nasa selected seven new members of the flight director team to oversee International Space Station operations, commercial crew and Artemis missions to the Moon. Class of 2022 inductees include Heidi Brewer, Ronak Dave, Chris Dobbins, Garrett Hehn, Nicole McElroy, Elias Myrmo and Diana Trujillo.

Flight directors lead the flight control team. Flight has overall operational responsibility for missions and payload operations and all decisions regarding safe and expeditious flight. This person watches the other flight controllers, remaining in constant verbal communication with them through intercom channels called “loops”.

After completing a comprehensive training program that includes operational leadership and risk management, as well as the technical aspects of flight control systems and spacecraft, these future flight directors will lead manned flight missions from the Center of mission control of NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

In this role, these individuals will lead teams of flight controllers, research and engineering experts, and support personnel around the world, making the real-time decisions essential to keeping NASA astronauts safe in the world. ‘space.

“These highly skilled individuals will be responsible for ensuring the safety of astronauts and executing human spaceflight missions,” NASA Director of Flight Operations Norm Knight said. “There were many outstanding candidates, both within the agency and throughout the spaceflight industry, which is a great indication of the immense talent we have here at NASA and within the growing spaceflight community.”

NASA Flight Director Class of 2022

A photo of the 2022 class of NASA flight directors who will oversee operations for the International Space Station, commercial crew, and Artemis missions to the Moon. Inductees from left to right: Heidi Brewer, Ronak Dave, Garrett Hehn, Diana Trujillo, Elias Myrmo, Chris Dobbins, Nicole McElroy. Credit: NASA

NASA flight directors lead missions to the space station and prepare for lunar missions for NASA’s Artemis program. The total number of agency flight directors is now 108 since mission control center namesake Christopher C. Kraft Jr. became the agency’s first flight director in 1958. The new class will be at the forefront of everything humans do in space, following in the footsteps of Apollo-era flight directors including Glynn Lunney, Gene Kranz and Kraft.

Becoming a NASA Flight Director requires years of study and dedication, as well as work experience in a high-stress environment, requiring quick decision-making.

“I am honored to welcome the Flight Director Class of 2022. This diverse group brings with them an impressive experience piloting the space station, launching rockets, driving March rovers and the development of interplanetary missions,” said NASA Acting Chief Flight Director Emily Nelson. “These flight directors and the experience they bring with them will be critical to humanity’s return to the Moon and future exploration of Mars. I am proud that they join our team.

Meet NASA’s newest class of flight directors:

Diana Trujillo

Diana Trujillo most recently served as Supervisor of the Integrated Planning and Sequencing Group for Surface Missions at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. In this role, she supported mission operations for NASA’s ongoing exploration missions to the surface of Mars as well as the planned Mars sample return mission. Previously, she served as mission leader for the Mars Perseverance rover, where she was responsible for the rover’s tactical command team and the team that analyzed the rover’s telemetry to determine its health and condition. She was surface flight director during the first surface operations of the Mars Perseverance rover, including the commissioning of the rover and the deployment of Ingenuity, the first helicopter to operate on another planet. Previously, she was mission leader and deputy team leader of engineering operations for the Mars Curiosity mission.

Trujillo was born and raised in Cali, Colombia, and earned a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland at College Park, with additional studies at University of Florida in Gainesville. She is also a graduate of Miami-Dade College in Florida and the NASA Academy at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia. In 2021, she received the Cruz de Boyacá, the highest honor the Colombian government gives to civilians.

Elias Myrmo

Elias Myrmo joined NASA in 2008 in the Mission Systems Division of the Flight Operations Directorate, working on Mission Control Center systems and information technology infrastructure. Myrmo became a specialist in the use of the onboard communication radio frequency network in 2010, logging over 2,000 console hours in support of International Space Station Expeditions 32-50. Since 2016, he has been head of the Exploration Flight Dynamics and Operations group, responsible for the training and certification of flight dynamic officers for Artemis missions. The group is also responsible for launch-day public protection through range security, as well as launch-day update operations for the agency’s Space Launch System rocket during Artemis missions.

Myrmo grew up in Naples, Florida and graduated from the University of Central Florida in Orlando with a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.

Nicole (Lewis) McElroy

Nicole McElroy joins NASA’s Flight Director team from Virgin Orbit in Long Beach, California, where she worked as a launch director. McElroy began her work at Virgin Orbit as an intern, then returned full-time as a propulsion systems engineer to design the thruster and pressurizer management systems. She then qualified these systems for flight, directing the first and second stage test campaigns. McElroy eventually joined the launch operations team as the rocket systems operator for LauncherOne’s first two flights. She served as launch director for the third and fourth flights, where she was responsible for the entire launch operations schedule.

McElroy was born in England and raised in Highlands Ranch, Colorado. She is a graduate of the major of the Colombia University School of Engineering and Applied Science in New York, graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering in 2015.

Garrett Hehn

Garrett Hehn began his NASA career in 2014 in the International Space Station’s Trajectory Operations Group and achieved Trajectory Operations Officer certification in 2016. In this role, he led Expedition 50, a SpaceX commercial space station resupply mission for NASA, development of Sierra Space Dream Chaser and Boeing’s Crew Flight Test. Hehn led a revamp of an agency training stream and has been an instructor for other trainees since earning certification as a trajectory operations officer. In 2018, he broadened his scope to become the Artemis II Senior Flight Dynamics Officer while maintaining his previous roles. Earlier this year, he earned his flight dynamics officer certification for Artemis I.

Hehn grew up in Pittsburgh and graduated from Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering and minors in Math and Spanish.

Chris Dobbin

Chris Dobbins also started his career at NASA in 2011 in the Pathways Intern program. He began his full-time NASA career as the space station’s environmental and thermal operating systems flight controller in 2014, logging more than 2,500 hours of console time and serving as a leader for the space station. International Space Station Expedition 56 and several spacewalks. Later, he began supporting the Boeing Starliner spacecraft as a flight controller responsible for emergencies, environment, and consumables, working in mission control for the company’s uncrewed flight test for NASA. Most recently, he was responsible for ascent and entry for Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test 2, while helping develop operational strategies and conduct astronaut training for the test mission in company manned flight, including manned vehicle emergency response procedures.

Dobbins is from Crystal Lake, Illinois and graduated from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering.

Ronak Dave

Ronak Dave started his career at NASA in 2011 as part of the Pathways Intern program. After becoming a full-time NASA engineer, he began working with the International Space Station’s Motion Control Systems Group as an attitude determination and control officer. In this role, he logged over 1,000 mission control hours and supported a SpaceX commercial resupply mission to the station for NASA. He then moved to the Propulsion Systems Group to support the development and operations of Orion, Space Launch System and Boeing Starliner. He supported the Boeing Starliner Orbital Flight Test-1 mission as a propulsion officer. Most recently, he served as the ascent propulsion officer for the Boeing Starliner Orbit Flight Test-2 mission, supported astronaut training for the Boeing Starliner Crewed Flight Test, and served as the primary propulsion systems officer for SLS and propulsion officer for Orion for the Artemis I mission, while leading rocket operations as a surge systems engineer for Artemis II.

Dave grew up in Secaucus, New Jersey, and graduated from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana with a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering.

Heidi Brewer

Heidi Brewer began her career at NASA in 2006 in the Space Shuttle Instrumentation and Communications Officer group. In this role, she supported 19 shuttle missions and led the last shuttle flight, STS-135. When the shuttle program ended in 2011, Brewer moved to the space station systems and integration engineering group, where she worked as an operations and training integration specialist with SpaceX. She has supported more than 20 Dragon missions for NASA’s Commercial Resupply and Commercial Crew Services programs, serving as the lead for several SpaceX on-station resupply missions for NASA, and Axiom Mission 1, the first private astronaut mission to space station. Brewer has also served as the lead operations integrator for the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, the Common Communication for Visiting Vehicles ship-to-ship radio system, and most recently the Artemis Human Landing System.

Brewer grew up in Marietta, Georgia, earned a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from Georgia Tech in Atlanta in 2005, and holds a Master of Science in Aeronautical Science from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Atlanta. Florida.

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Director of Rocket Companies, Inc. (NYSE:RKT) buys $21,480.00 worth of stock https://stlouisrocketry.org/director-of-rocket-companies-inc-nyserkt-buys-21480-00-worth-of-stock/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 22:15:56 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/director-of-rocket-companies-inc-nyserkt-buys-21480-00-worth-of-stock/ Rocket Companies, Inc. (NYSE:RKT – Get Rating) Director Matthew Rizik purchased 3,000 shares of the company in a trade dated Thursday, June 23. The shares were purchased at an average price of $7.16 per share, with a total value of $21,480.00. Following completion of the transaction, the administrator now owns 217,902 shares of the company, […]]]>

Rocket Companies, Inc. (NYSE:RKT – Get Rating) Director Matthew Rizik purchased 3,000 shares of the company in a trade dated Thursday, June 23. The shares were purchased at an average price of $7.16 per share, with a total value of $21,480.00. Following completion of the transaction, the administrator now owns 217,902 shares of the company, valued at approximately $1,560,178.32. The acquisition was disclosed in a legal filing with the SEC, accessible via this hyperlink.

Matthew Rizik also recently made the following trade(s):

  • On Tuesday, June 21, Matthew Rizik purchased 3,200 shares of Rocket Companies. The shares were purchased at an average price of $6.73 per share, with a total value of $21,536.00.
  • On Friday, June 17, Matthew Rizik purchased 3,400 shares of Rocket Companies. The shares were purchased at an average price of $6.46 per share, with a total value of $21,964.00.
  • On Wednesday, June 15, Matthew Rizik purchased 3,100 shares of Rocket Companies. The shares were purchased at an average price of $6.98 per share, with a total value of $21,638.00.
  • On Monday, June 13, Matthew Rizik purchased 2,900 shares of Rocket Companies. The shares were purchased at an average price of $7.35 per share, with a total value of $21,315.00.
(A d)

What is the most productive stock you have ever owned? Dividends from these stocks have grown so rapidly over the years that they now earn us an average of 26%!

When you start getting paid 26% on your money, your financial troubles tend to evaporate.

RKT traded down $0.32 on Friday, hitting $7.73. The stock had a trading volume of 6,174,792 shares, compared to an average volume of 5,097,000. Rocket Companies, Inc. has a fifty-two-week low of $6.27 and a fifty-two-week high. of $20.84. The company has a 50-day moving average of $8.44 and a 200-day moving average of $11.24. The company has a current ratio of 13.54, a quick ratio of 13.54 and a debt ratio of 1.40. The company has a market cap of $15.23 billion, a price-to-earnings ratio of 4.66, a growth price-to-earnings ratio of 2.64, and a beta of 1.38.

Rocket Companies (NYSE:RKT – Get Rating) last reported results on Tuesday, May 10. The company reported earnings per share (EPS) of $0.12 for the quarter, missing analyst consensus estimates of $0.16 per ($0.04). Rocket Companies had a return on equity of 31.45% and a net margin of 2.16%. The company posted revenue of $1.93 billion in the quarter, versus analyst estimates of $2.24 billion. During the same period of the previous year, the company achieved EPS of $0.55. Rocket Companies revenue for the quarter was down 52.2% year over year. Sell-side analysts expect Rocket Companies, Inc. to post EPS of 0.26 for the current fiscal year.

A number of research companies have weighed in on RKT recently. Argus downgraded Rocket Companies from a “buy” rating to a “hold” rating in a Tuesday, May 31 research report. Morgan Stanley lowered its price target on Rocket Companies from $12.00 to $11.00 and set an “equal weight” rating for the company in a Thursday, April 7 research report. Royal Bank of Canada lowered its price target on Rocket Companies from $18.00 to $9.00 in a Thursday, May 12 research report. Barclays lowered its price target on Rocket Companies from $14.00 to $13.00 and set an “equal weight” rating for the company in a Tuesday, April 12 research report. Finally, Citigroup downgraded Rocket Companies from a “buy” rating to a “neutral” rating and lowered its price target for the stock from $14.00 to $8.00 in a Wednesday, May 11 research report. . One equity research analyst gave the stock a sell rating, eleven gave the stock a hold rating and one gave the stock a buy rating. According to data from MarketBeat.com, the stock currently has a consensus rating of “Hold” and a consensus target price of $11.08.

Several hedge funds have recently changed their holdings in RKT. Vanguard Group Inc. increased its stake in shares of Rocket Companies by 29.0% in the first quarter. Vanguard Group Inc. now owns 10,028,437 shares of the company valued at $111,517,000 after purchasing an additional 2,252,066 shares during the period. Renaissance Technologies LLC increased its stake in shares of Rocket Companies by 378.7% in the first quarter. Renaissance Technologies LLC now owns 2,357,100 shares of the company valued at $26,211,000 after purchasing an additional 1,864,700 shares during the period. Federated Hermes Inc. increased its stake in shares of Rocket Companies by 195.2% in the first quarter. Federated Hermes Inc. now owns 1,558,417 shares of the company valued at $17,330,000 after purchasing an additional 1,030,536 shares during the period. Invesco Ltd. increased its stake in shares of Rocket Companies by 10.0% in the fourth quarter. Invesco Ltd. now owns 10,298,814 shares of the company valued at $144,183,000 after purchasing an additional 934,907 shares during the period. Finally, Bruni JV & Co. Co. acquired a new stake in shares of Rocket Companies in the fourth quarter valued at approximately $11,947,000. 3.71% of the shares are held by institutional investors.

Company Profile Rocket Companies (Get an assessment)

Rocket Companies, Inc. operates in the technology-driven real estate, mortgage, and e-commerce industries in the United States and Canada. It operates through two segments, Direct to Consumer and Partner Network. The Company’s solutions include Rocket Mortgage, a mortgage lender; Amrock which provides title insurance, real estate appraisal and settlement services; Rocket Homes, a home search platform and realtor referral network, which offers technology services to support the home buying and selling experience; Rocket Auto, an automotive retail marketplace that provides centralized, virtual car-selling support to online car-buying platforms; and Rocket Loans, an online personal loan company.

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Insider buying and selling by quarter for rocket companies (NYSE: RKT)

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First autonomous 3D-printed rocket nears launch – IoT World Today https://stlouisrocketry.org/first-autonomous-3d-printed-rocket-nears-launch-iot-world-today/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:40:13 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/first-autonomous-3d-printed-rocket-nears-launch-iot-world-today/ Relativity Space achieved an industry first with the development of a 3D printed rocket. Both stages of the group’s Terran-1 rocket were shipped to a launch pad at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, bringing the startup closer to the first orbital launch of its rocket; scheduled for 2024. Terran-1 is comprised of nine […]]]>

Relativity Space achieved an industry first with the development of a 3D printed rocket.

Both stages of the group’s Terran-1 rocket were shipped to a launch pad at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, bringing the startup closer to the first orbital launch of its rocket; scheduled for 2024.

Terran-1 is comprised of nine 3D-printed booster engines, constructed primarily from aluminum. The construction process leverages 3D printing, AI, and autonomous robotics to optimize its design and construction. Additionally, these digital tools allow Relativity Space to significantly speed up the process and reduce touchpoints and delays, as well as making reliability increasingly robust. According to Relativity Space, its Terran 1 and Terran R rockets can be created from raw material in 60 days.

Terran R is expected to launch from the Relativity-built launch pad at Cape Canaveral, starting in 2024.

Going forward, the group – which is the second-largest private space company in the world after Elon Musk’s SpaceX – plans to expand its 3D printing factory to include not just rockets, but also infrastructure elements. necessary for civilization on Mars.

Founder Tim Ellis said in an interview with the World Economic Forum that his company’s intention is to make it easier for people to travel to Mars, saying making humanity “multi-planetary” was a solution to problems such as climate change and land use. Ultimately, Ellis wants to put 1 million people on Mars, and he sees his 3D-printed rockets as the way to get there.

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Science News Roundup: South Korea’s second space rocket launch successfully puts satellites in orbit; Scientists probe link between ‘snowblood’ and climate change and more https://stlouisrocketry.org/science-news-roundup-south-koreas-second-space-rocket-launch-successfully-puts-satellites-in-orbit-scientists-probe-link-between-snowblood-and-climate-change-and-more/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 12:56:34 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/science-news-roundup-south-koreas-second-space-rocket-launch-successfully-puts-satellites-in-orbit-scientists-probe-link-between-snowblood-and-climate-change-and-more/ Here is a summary of current scientific news. South Korea’s second space rocket launch successfully puts satellites into orbit South Korea’s second test launch of its locally produced Nuri rocket successfully placed several satellites into orbit on Tuesday, officials said, marking a major milestone in efforts to revive its space program after the […]]]>

Here is a summary of current scientific news.

South Korea’s second space rocket launch successfully puts satellites into orbit

South Korea’s second test launch of its locally produced Nuri rocket successfully placed several satellites into orbit on Tuesday, officials said, marking a major milestone in efforts to revive its space program after the failed launch. a first test last year. The rocket lifted off from Naro Space Center on South Korea’s southern coast at 4 p.m. (0700 GMT). A 162.5 kg (358 lb) satellite designed to check rocket performance has successfully made contact with a base station in Antarctica after entering orbit, officials said.

Scientists probe link between ‘snowblood’ and climate change

Standing on a snowy mountainside about 2,500 meters above sea level, Eric Marechal brandishes a crimson test tube. Inside is a sample of algae known as “snow blood”, a phenomenon that is accelerating the thawing of the Alps and which scientists fear will spread. “These algae are green. But when they are in the snow, they accumulate a little pigment like sunscreen to protect themselves”, explains Maréchal, research director at the National Center for Scientific Research in Grenoble, who took samples laboratory samples on the Brévent mountain with teammates.

Chilean beachgoers become guardians of Elasmosaurus fossils

While walking along the beach of Los Tubos on Chile’s central coast, a group of neighbors found strange remains that turned out to be fossils of an ancient marine reptile that lived in the surrounding sea ages ago. millions of years. Several fossils belonging to the long-necked sea creature from the Late Cretaceous period, known as Elasmosaurus, were discovered by Andrea Galvez and other residents of the town of Algarrobo, about 95 km (60 miles) ) east of Santiago, the country’s capital.

(With agency contributions.)

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Richard D. Fisher, Jr. On Taiwan: Countering Chinese Bullying and Coercion https://stlouisrocketry.org/richard-d-fisher-jr-on-taiwan-countering-chinese-bullying-and-coercion/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/richard-d-fisher-jr-on-taiwan-countering-chinese-bullying-and-coercion/ For Taiwan, the United States and its allies, it is crucial to step up countermeasures to the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) campaign of military intimidation and coercion lest it become convinced that it can get away with minor assaults contributing to the confidence to undertake an invasion of Taiwan. Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) seems […]]]>

For Taiwan, the United States and its allies, it is crucial to step up countermeasures to the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) campaign of military intimidation and coercion lest it become convinced that it can get away with minor assaults contributing to the confidence to undertake an invasion of Taiwan.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) seems to understand. While on a weekend tour of the Dragon Boat Festival on June 2, 2022 of Taiwan’s 66th Marine Brigade, without warning, she stopped to pick up and feel the Kestrel Shouldered Infantry Rocket designed and made in Taiwan.

At that time, President Tsai herself was showing Taiwanese and the free world that it is possible to challenge the CCP’s invasion and hegemony – if she can fire an invading vehicle-killing rocket, everything another adult citizen of Taiwan can too.

It was a most serious gesture, reminiscent of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s late July 1940 visit to Hartlepool to inspect the coastal defences, where he was photographed with a Thompson submachine gun, clutching his cigar.

Churchill rallied the British with a much-needed image of defiance at a time of justified fears of a massive German amphibious invasion, as the Battle of Britain was far from decided.

Today the battle of Taiwan is far from being decided and it is possible that it will continue like this. Yet, it is important to consider how far the CCP and its People’s Liberation Army (PLA) have come.

Photo: the presidential office via AFP

During the Taiwan Crises of the 1950s, it was Taiwan’s Air Force that fought in the skies above China – not Taiwan. The United States, an official military ally of Taiwan, saw fit to send Matador cruise missiles with 20 kiloton tactical nuclear warheads to Taiwan and was ready to use them.

But with the help of American, European, Israeli, and then Russian technology, CCP leader Deng Xiaoping (鄧小平) was able to begin the rearmament of China, which in 1995 his successor Jiang Zemin (江澤民) began to focus on Taiwan, firing DF-15s and DF-11 missiles to intimidate voters on the island in 1995 and 1996.

Then, in 1999, a much more powerful PLA Air Force (PLAAF) began patrols towards the center line, effectively taking control of half of the Taiwan Strait, an air presence that increased in the decade of the 2000s under Hu Jintao (胡錦濤).

Current CCP leader Xi Jinping (習近平) exploits new waves of modernization in the PLAAF and PLA Navy (PLAN) by escalating into what has become a virtual war around Taiwan, beginning around 2015 with patrols occasional H-6K nuclear-capable bombers around Taiwan until today. the third year of near-daily groups of fighter and intelligence support aircraft harassing the island.

In May 2020, this campaign of intimidation escalated on two levels. For the first time, the aircraft carrier PLAN Liaoning, operating in a full battle group east of Taiwan, coordinated with large groups of combat aircraft operating in the south and east of the island .

Then, on May 24, four PLAAF H-6K bombers and two Tu-95MS bombers from the Russian Air Force joined for the fourth joint China-Russia bombing exercise.

First, over the Sea of ​​Japan, then in the area where the Liaoning Battle Group was exercising, this again demonstrated that Russia will support the CCP’s aggression against Taiwan and potentially engage in joint nuclear operations with the PLA against the United States and other countries. who can come to defend Taiwan.

So far, the CCP and the PLA have not fired on Taiwanese planes responding to the PLA’s intimidation drills, nor have they shot down any of the many Japanese, American and allied planes that responded to the intimidation drills. aerial intimidation of the PLA in Japan, Taiwan or the South China Sea.

But on May 26, the PLA demonstrated that it could cross that line, when somewhere in the South China Sea, a PLAAF J-16 attack fighter harassed a P- 8A of the Royal Australian Air Force firing flares while crossing sharply close to the nose of the P-8A.

These flares only had time to create small blooms of metallic particles, but they could be dense enough to damage the engines of the Australian patrol aircraft, and if this damage were caused near new Chinese bases in the Paracel or Spratly island groups, far from diversionary airfields in the Philippines or Malaysia, the P-8A may have to land at a new Chinese base where it will be captured and exploited for intelligence purposes.

The fact that China will continue to push the limits of its coercive exercises until it begins to “kill” Taiwanese, American, Japanese or Australian aircraft has been amply demonstrated by two long-running military campaigns in Asia that China is undergoing. to win.

First, with virtually no physical pushback, China has successfully bullied Southeast Asia and the United States since the mid-1970s with a gradual campaign to occupy islets in the South China Sea. which culminated in the rapid construction in the late 2000s of new large naval vessels. – missile bases in the Spratly Islands group.

Second, since the early 2010s, facing no sanctions or penalties, China has transferred enough missile-related technology to help transform North Korea into a nuclear missile state.

In addition to increased interceptions of PLA aircraft by Taiwanese and Japanese Air Force fighters, and more recent Japanese use of small carriers to track larger carriers PLAN, a sophisticated US military response to China’s escalating bullying has begun.

This has included regular US Navy exercise patrols, sometimes in response to PLAN exercises, and a large number of US aircraft patrol operations. This activity was not “announced” by the Pentagon, perhaps to prevent domestic alarm.

Now, however, it is necessary to begin to demonstrate to the PLA that its aggression will lead to mass losses of PLAN ships and PLAAF aircraft.

This is necessary both to deter the CCP from beginning to kill occasionally as part of its harassment, and to deter it from deciding to undertake major assaults such as an invasion of Taiwan.

As the PLA has long used simulations of Japanese and American fixed bases in Asia for precision long-range missile exercises, and has developed mobile target platforms to practice anti-ship ballistic missile strikes against carriers. -US Navy planes, it’s time to give the CCP some of the same medicine.

As the PLA will primarily rely on large “civilian” roll-on-roll-off (RORO) ferries and civilian cargo and passenger aircraft to transport the bulk of its troops, armor and occupation forces to Taiwan, the United States, Japan and Taiwan should build large plastic simulations of these ferries which explode spectacularly when hit by anti-ship missiles.

Along the same lines, Taiwan could easily build large and accurate display boards of different Chinese airframes to be used for target practice by marine, army, police and force units. Taiwanese reserves armed with anti-aircraft artillery, and even shoulder-launched Kestrel rockets.

Another impressive countermeasure to CCP intimidation would be to increase joint US-South Korean force exercises to levels approaching 200,000 troops, similar to the “Team Spirit” exercises of the 1980s.

Additionally, Japan and the United States could launch a series of large amphibious and airborne assaults to defend or retake sparsely populated islands in the Ryukyu Island chain, especially some near Taiwan.

The CCP and the PLA use their campaigns of intimidation and coercion to help train for real wars against Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, Australia, India and the United States. United.

It is time for the United States, its allies, and Taiwan to launch counter-intimidation training campaigns with increasing kinetic effects that demonstrate to the CCP that it will lose any war it starts.

Richard D. Fisher, Jr is a senior researcher at the International Center for Assessment and Strategy.

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Somali forces kill dozens of al-Shabab terrorists in central Somalia https://stlouisrocketry.org/somali-forces-kill-dozens-of-al-shabab-terrorists-in-central-somalia/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 20:21:44 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/somali-forces-kill-dozens-of-al-shabab-terrorists-in-central-somalia/ Washington— Dozens of people were killed in fierce fighting between locals backed by Somali government forces and al-Shabab militants in the central Somalia town of Adado, witnesses and witnesses told VOA on Friday. regional managers. Witnesses and Somali officials in the area said the fighting began when members of the terror group invaded the small […]]]>

Dozens of people were killed in fierce fighting between locals backed by Somali government forces and al-Shabab militants in the central Somalia town of Adado, witnesses and witnesses told VOA on Friday. regional managers.

Witnesses and Somali officials in the area said the fighting began when members of the terror group invaded the small town of Bahdo, about 60 kilometers east of Adado.

Somali army spokesman Yabal Haji Aden told VOA that the militants began their attack with a vehicle-borne suicide explosive, which detonated near the entrance to the town. This sparked an intense street battle between the militants and the town’s local militia, which was supported by units of the Somali forces.

“They tried to blow up three vehicles loaded with explosives…one of the [which] exploded when our soldiers hit it with a rocket-propelled grenade,” the spokesperson said. [then] abandoned the second, and the third vehicle escaped.

Galguduud Regional Governor Ali Elmi Ganey said the joint forces killed around 47 fighters from the extremist group.

“Terrorists have tasted death, both inside and outside the city. They left 47 corpses, rifles and military ammunition,” he said.

Town residents and officials said three children, a well-known religious scholar and three soldiers were also killed in the fighting.

Bahdo is known to have been a base for moderate Islamist scholars, the governor said, explaining that fighters belonging to the moderate Sufi Islamist militia known as the Ahlu-Sunna Wal-Jamaa – a group nominally aligned with the Somali army considering al-Shabab extremists as an enemy — were involved in the fighting.

Ahlu-Sunna Wal-Jamaa began a war against al-Shabab militants in late 2008 over sectarian differences, but also clashed with government forces over political differences and control of the central Somali city .

In an interview with VOA, Ahmed Shire Falagle, Minister of Information for Galmudug State, which includes Galguduud Administrative Region, said the militants’ attack on the town was not a surprise.

“Our forces, those of Ahlu-Sunnah and the inhabitants, [were] warned before al-Shabab’s attack,” he said, adding that al-Shabab had suffered around 100 casualties, including dead and wounded.

After the fighting, local militias and government forces showed the bodies of around 30 dead militants.

Al-Shabab has been fighting for years to dislodge the country’s central government and targets moderate Islamist groups.

The group frequently carries out shootings and bombings against military and civilian targets and has also attacked regional targets, particularly in neighboring Kenya.

Analysts said Friday’s fighting was the deadliest in years for al-Shabab and came days after Somalia’s president appointed a new prime minister, who called the fight against al-Shabab a priority.

Abdiwahid Isaq contributed to this report.

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FBI and Commerce agents investigate US electronics in Russian military equipment https://stlouisrocketry.org/fbi-and-commerce-agents-investigate-us-electronics-in-russian-military-equipment/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:55:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/fbi-and-commerce-agents-investigate-us-electronics-in-russian-military-equipment/ Placeholder while loading article actions Federal agents have begun questioning US tech companies about how their computer chips ended up in Russian military hardware recovered from Ukraine. Commerce Department officials who enforce export controls are leading the investigations with the FBI, making joint visits to businesses to inquire about Western chips and components found in […]]]>
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Federal agents have begun questioning US tech companies about how their computer chips ended up in Russian military hardware recovered from Ukraine.

Commerce Department officials who enforce export controls are leading the investigations with the FBI, making joint visits to businesses to inquire about Western chips and components found in Russian radar systems, drones, tanks, ground control equipment and coastal vessels, people say close to the case, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive investigations.

“Our goal is actually to try to trace that, back to the American supplier” to determine “how it ended up in that weapons system,” a Commerce Department official said of the probes.

“Just because a chip, a company’s chip, is in a weapon system doesn’t mean we’ve opened an investigation into that company,” the official added. “What we have done, however, is we have opened an investigation into how this company’s chip got into this system.”

Russian drones shot down over Ukraine were filled with Western parts. Can the United States cut them?

It is unclear which specific components are being probed. But investigators from various countries have identified Western electronic components in Russian weapons found in Ukraine. Many of these components appear to have been made years ago, before the United States tightened export restrictions after Russia seized Crimea in 2014. But others were made as recently as 2020, according to Conflict Armament Research (CAR), a research group in London that examined some pieces.

For years, it was legal for companies to sell commodity computer chips to Russian military entities without first receiving permission from the US government. Therefore, to identify illegal sales, one must determine the type of chip and the date of sale. Tracing transactions can also be cumbersome because electronic components often pass through a chain of distributors before reaching the end user.

A lawyer representing one of the tech companies contacted said investigators for now are casting a “wide net”, examining a variety of different chips and electronic components to trace the paths they took to the military. Russian.

Among the questions federal agents are asking: whether the tech companies sold their products to a specific list of companies, including middlemen, who may have been involved in the supply chain, the lawyer said.

Russia manufactures few computer chips or electronic devices itself, forcing it to rely on imports.

For decades, the United States has tightly controlled sales to Russia of the highest-tech chips and those designed for military use, requiring exporters to obtain a government license. But sales of electronics below that threshold — including those commonly found in commercial products — weren’t largely restricted until 2014, when the United States began requiring exporters to they obtain licenses before selling a wider range of chips to the Russian military.

Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February, the United States and many allies have banned all chip sales to Russian military buyers and imposed restrictions on chip sales to other Russian buyers in the purpose of preventing the country’s armed forces from gaining access to Western high technology.

The federal investigations come as searchers and security services from Ukraine, Britain and elsewhere report finding a host of Western electronics in damaged or abandoned Russian military gear in Ukraine.

Sanctions forcing Russia to use aircraft parts in military equipment, US says

Last month, CAR sent investigators to Ukraine to examine Russian weapons and communications equipment, and reported finding components from 70 companies based in the United States and Europe.

They found parts in military radios, airborne defense systems and in remnants of cruise missiles that the Ukrainians recovered from various towns and villages, Damien Spleeters, one of the CAR investigators, said in a statement. interview.

The CAR is currently declining to name the Western companies involved, as it continues to contact them for more information, Spleeters said.

Marks on two foreign-made chips that Spleeters examined showed they were made in 2019, he said.

“It’s important to me because it shows that even after Russia took Crimea and the first round of sanctions was taken against them, they still managed to acquire critical technology, critical components for parts equipment that they are now using against Ukraine,” Spleeters said. said.

These chips, found inside two Russian military radios recovered from Ukraine’s Luhansk region, had some of their identification marks scratched out, suggesting that Russia “wanted to make it harder to find out who was involved in the chain of supply,” Spleeters said.

Another set of chips made by Western companies between 2017 and 2020 were part of missile fragments that struck the southern Ukrainian city of Mykolaiv on March 29, Spleeters said. At the time, Russian forces were trying to seize a large swath of Ukraine’s Black Sea coast.

CAR also examined Western-made chips made between 2013 and 2018 that were part of a missile that landed in central Ukraine on Feb. 24, the first day of the Russian invasion, Spleeters said.

CAR’s latest findings follow a report by the group late last year that detailed Western electronics found in several Russian military drones.

A team from a separate UK group – the Royal United Services Institute, or RUSI, a defence-focused think tank – also visited Ukraine recently to inspect Russian equipment and examine military-led takedowns Ukrainian.

A single radio jamming device revealed computer chips from a dozen US companies, including Intel, Analog Devices, Texas Instruments and Onsemi, according to a report by RUSI in April. The equipment also contained components from half a dozen chipmakers in Europe, Japan and Taiwan.

The report published component part numbers, which the Washington Post used to identify the chip companies.

The radio interference equipment, codenamed Borisoglebsk-2, was designed to disrupt enemy communications and was likely manufactured around 2015 or later, Nick Reynolds, one of the report’s authors, said in a statement. interview.

None of the Western chips were specifically designed for use in military equipment, according to two electrical engineers who reviewed the component list. The parts were developed for general commercial use, and many were relatively outdated, made between 2000 and 2010, the engineers said.

“Many of these components are very general purpose and could be used in a wide range of devices,” said Peter Bermel, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University. “Most of the items they list are available from any commercial computer parts supplier or digital parts supplier.”

“A sizeable fraction of these parts are now considered obsolete by manufacturers,” Bermel added.

China cuts tech exports to Russia after US sanctions

Reynolds, a land warfare research analyst at RUSI, said Russia’s technical demise in recent decades, partly caused by a massive post-Soviet brain drain, has forced it to use Western chips. “Its defense industry struggled to attract and retain talented young engineers, who often opted to go overseas,” Reynolds said by email.

Intel spokesman William Moss said that for more than a decade, all of the company’s “sales in Russia have been through distributors responsible for compliance with applicable laws, including U.S. export controls”.

“Intel has suspended all deliveries to customers in Russia and Belarus, and Intel will continue to comply with all applicable export regulations and sanctions,” he added.

Onsemi, a Phoenix-based chip company, said it stopped producing one of the chips found in Russian equipment in 2008. The chip was “designed for a variety of uses in commercial products” , spokeswoman Stefanie Cuene said, adding that the company is in compliance. US export controls and does not currently sell any products to Russia or Belarus.

Texas Instruments “complies with applicable laws and regulations” and “does not sell any products in Russia or Belarus,” spokeswoman Ellen Fishpaw said.

Analog Devices, the company behind more than a dozen components found in the Russian gear, did not respond to requests for comment.

RUSI researchers also reported inspecting a US-made component that the Ukrainian military found inside a Russian 9M949 guided rocket. The rocket uses the component – a type of electronic device called a fiber optic gyroscope – for navigation, RUSI said.

The British researchers declined to name the American company that made this component, saying RUSI was continuing to research this and other components.

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Danick Martel scores three points and helps the Laval Rocket force Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final against the Springfield Thunderbirds (video) https://stlouisrocketry.org/danick-martel-scores-three-points-and-helps-the-laval-rocket-force-game-7-of-the-eastern-conference-final-against-the-springfield-thunderbirds-video/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 01:48:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/danick-martel-scores-three-points-and-helps-the-laval-rocket-force-game-7-of-the-eastern-conference-final-against-the-springfield-thunderbirds-video/ SPRINGFIELD — The Thunderbirds squandered a great opportunity to clinch their first Calder Cup championship appearance in 31 years on Monday as the Laval Rocket cruised to a 5-1 victory in Game 6 of the Conference Finals. the East at the MassMutual Center. “I don’t think we’re creating enough secondary chances,” Springfield coach Drew Bannister […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD — The Thunderbirds squandered a great opportunity to clinch their first Calder Cup championship appearance in 31 years on Monday as the Laval Rocket cruised to a 5-1 victory in Game 6 of the Conference Finals. the East at the MassMutual Center.

“I don’t think we’re creating enough secondary chances,” Springfield coach Drew Bannister said of his team’s 0-for-4 power-play effort. we had a lot of jumps in our game, and (Laval) seemed to get more pucks than us. »

The victory forces Game 7, which will take place at the MassMutual Center on Wednesday at 7:05 p.m.

After taking a one-goal lead in the second, Gabriel Borque doubled Laval’s lead with a wrist flick past a diving defender inside the left face-off circle less than a minute into the game. last period. Danick Martel then scored his third point of the night (two goals, one assist) as he maneuvered around an overwhelmed Joel Hofer, making it 3-0 for Laval with 11:09 left in regulation.

The Thunderbirds avoided the shutout as Matthew Peca gathered a sold-out hometown crowd of 6,793 fans as he lit the lamp with 4:55 left. The goal was Peca’s fourth in the playoffs, while Nathan Todd got his sixth assist.

In the end, it wasn’t enough as Brandon Gignac and Lucas Condotta scored back-to-back late goals to help the Rocket win.

Despite 14 combined shots and a trio of failed power play attempts, Springfield and Laval went scoreless for 20 minutes of action.

Hoping to change that result to start the second, Tanner Kaspick and Will Bitten tried to revive the Thunderbirds offense by countering on the best opportunities after turnovers. Laval goaltender Cayden Primeau then made two of his game-high 30 saves to keep things tight in the second period.

The score didn’t stay that way for long, as Hofer tried to punt, but Martel intercepted the puck. In response, the left winger sent him high endsecuring the Rocket a 1-0 lead with 15:02 remaining in the frame.

After the 34th minute, Rafaël Harvey-Pinard was called for tripping, granting Springfield their fourth power play attempt, still one point behind. But unlike those three previous attempts, the Thunderbirds kept Primeau guessing behind shots from different angles.

Springfield, however, failed to convert on their best human advantage opportunity as they forced a turnover and took off. Once Nathan Todd approached the opposing crease, he located Dakota Joshua along the weak side. But the center shot eventually sailed left with 1:44 remaining on the clock.

“Their goaltender (Primeau) has been good all series,” Bannister said. “He made timely saves for them where we are maybe able to separate some games or get closer. I would be more worried if the odds weren’t there.

“Ultimately, though, I think with the band in this room, it will eventually start.”

At the start of the second intermission, Laval remained in front despite being beaten by Springfield, 20-17.

Although the Thunderbirds now faced potential elimination, Bannister remained confident his team could still prevail.

“You have to find shooting lanes,” he said. “It’s up to the players on the ice to decide, especially the execution part since that’s the main thing. We don’t want to overdo it now. But as a coaching staff, we want to make sure they’re comfortable and confident in what they’re doing.

“At the end of the day, we want them to remember that we believe in them.”

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Vladimir Putin’s forces fire Cold War missiles because they’ve run out of rockets – World News https://stlouisrocketry.org/vladimir-putins-forces-fire-cold-war-missiles-because-theyve-run-out-of-rockets-world-news/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 01:55:21 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/vladimir-putins-forces-fire-cold-war-missiles-because-theyve-run-out-of-rockets-world-news/ The Defense Ministry said the warheads used by Russia are “highly inaccurate and therefore can cause significant collateral damage and civilian casualties”. Russia has turned to Cold War-era missiles to gain a foothold in the Donbass region Vladimir Putin was forced to deploy Cold War missiles designed to carry nuclear warheads after Russia ran out […]]]>

The Defense Ministry said the warheads used by Russia are “highly inaccurate and therefore can cause significant collateral damage and civilian casualties”.

Russia has turned to Cold War-era missiles to gain a foothold in the Donbass region

Vladimir Putin was forced to deploy Cold War missiles designed to carry nuclear warheads after Russia ran out of precision rockets.

According to the Defense Ministry, the five-and-a-half-ton missiles, designed to target aircraft carriers, are causing “significant collateral damage and civilian casualties” to Ukrainian forces in the Donbass region.

“When employed in a ground attack role with a conventional warhead, they are highly inaccurate and can, therefore, cause significant collateral damage and civilian casualties,” the Department of Defense said.

This comes as the Russian military focuses its efforts on capturing the Donbass region in eastern Ukraine.

Ukraine retains control of the Azot chemical plant in Sievierodonetsk, which makes up half of Donbass, where hundreds of civilians are sheltering amid fierce fighting, the region’s governor said.







Russian President Vladimir Putin refused to call the invasion of Ukraine a war
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Russian shelling sparked a fire in the factory after tons of oil leaked, according to Governor Serhiy Haidai.

Ukraine has around 800 people hiding in bomb shelters under the plant, including around 200 employees and 600 local residents, amid fears Azot could become another Azovstal – a reference to the Mariupol steel plant headquarters that has lasted for weeks.

The Ministry of Defense said there was now “intense street-to-street fighting” and that “both sides are likely to suffer a large number of casualties”, reports the Telegraph.

Ukraine has called for faster deliveries of heavy weapons from the West to turn the tide of the war, saying Russian forces have at least 10 times more artillery pieces.







A nuclear missile rolls along Red Square during a military parade in Russia
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The news follows a Ukrainian artillery strike that reportedly killed hundreds of troops on June 11.

Footage has emerged showing a large ammunition store on fire after it was allegedly hit – leaving only one survivor.

Private soldiers from the infamous Russian band Wagner reportedly used the sports arena as a base in Kadiivka, eastern Ukraine.

The Wagner Group is considered Putin’s private army and has operated around the world. The Russian president reportedly used the group to give himself plausible denial as they are not explicitly linked to the Kremlin.

The group of 8,000 people have been accused of killing children, raping and torturing women and carrying out executions.

It is reported that up to 300 mercenaries were killed in the attack in what would be one of the highest casualties since the war in Ukraine began in February.

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