Rocket Science – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:34:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png Rocket Science – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 Fireflies of Social Change: The Tribune India https://stlouisrocketry.org/fireflies-of-social-change-the-tribune-india/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:34:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/fireflies-of-social-change-the-tribune-india/ Arun Maira President, HelpAge International At a historic conference organized by the UN in 2006, international business leaders met with deans of business schools and their students. About 50 business leaders have been invited by the Global Compact, a United Nations organization, to motivate businesses to contribute to global goals of reducing […]]]>


Arun Maira


President, HelpAge International

At a historic conference organized by the UN in 2006, international business leaders met with deans of business schools and their students. About 50 business leaders have been invited by the Global Compact, a United Nations organization, to motivate businesses to contribute to global goals of reducing environmental degradation, persistent poverty and rising inequality . They met dozens of business school deans as well as hundreds of students in person and online, invited by the Academy of Management, the international association of management schools. I participated in the meeting with Professor CK Prahalad, author of The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid.

Current structures favor those who have the most and discriminate against those who historically have little.

The meeting was designed to be participatory, with many discussions in which the views of the students were heard. A student posted her reflection in the debate. “Making a profit is easy, changing the world is hard,” she said. Another said that business schools teach methods to increase efficiency and profits; they failed to teach ways to understand human aspirations and improve social justice. Business students learn to pay more attention to data and, unfortunately, less to listen to ordinary people.

A billionaire philanthropist sitting next to me was exasperated by the proceedings. When it came to the pollution of rivers and the depletion of fresh water sources, he said, “They still don’t understand. Technology will find solutions: rocket science is advancing rapidly. When we run out of water on Earth, we will find another planet with water and we will go there.

His predictions of technological advancements seem to be coming true. Some of the world’s most admired commercial innovators – Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson – are promising commercial space travel. Pre-bookings of tickets costing millions of dollars are open to those who can afford them. (Perhaps the billionaire who made the prediction has already bought one.) Meanwhile, billions on Earth are waiting for the benefits of technologies held by the wealthiest nations and wealthiest people to trickle down to them.

The billions most affected by climate change were heard by Sharm el-Sheikh’s wealthy few at COP27. The global climate has been damaged by the same technologies that have fueled economic growth in rich countries with only 10% of the world’s population. The rich do not want to change their own lifestyles, which have caused the most damage to the global environment. They demand that the poor, who are struggling to survive, reduce their carbon footprint faster. They want the poorest countries, where 90% of the people live, to stop using carbon-based technologies and switch to renewables more quickly, while they take their time to change.

Human civilization is at a turning point. The limits of the rich and powerful in solving the world’s problems are exposed. The rapid fall of Musk, an imaginary saviour, from grace is a sign. He is admired as a bold innovator who turned the hydrocarbon-intensive auto industry on its head to go electric. His company, Space-X, is the leader in privately funded rocket technology. He became the richest man in the world with the most appreciated companies by the stock markets. In his pride, his values ​​were exposed and a role model for young entrepreneurs crashed. Musk doesn’t care about the people who work at his companies. They have to work 24/7 to ensure the success of his businesses. When he doesn’t even care about those he needs for his glory, can he really care about the billions left behind that are just numbers in his mental spreadsheet?

“Innovation” and “entrepreneurship” have become buzzwords in the business world. They are an integral part of the curriculum of management schools. They also infect the school curricula of schoolchildren. We must be wary of the concepts taught and the models of innovation and entrepreneurship provided. Entrepreneurs who have used the power of digital technology to grow their wealth are often role models, many hailing from the Silicon Valleys of California and India. A measure of a nation’s entrepreneurial culture is the number of unicorns it produces, i.e. financial companies that are quickly assigned high values ​​in the stock market. Unfortunately, financial values ​​often trample human values, as Musk’s story reveals. Like a rocket, the wealth of a few unicorns increases very rapidly while ordinary people on the ground look up enviously.

A new breed of entrepreneurs is needed to change the world for the better for all. Innovative entrepreneurs are also essential in the social sector to change the structures of society and the economy. Current structures favor those who have the most and discriminate against those who historically have little. New entrepreneurs should measure the success of their businesses by their impact on the dignity and wealth of ordinary people, rather than by the impressions they make on financial investors.

New models of leadership are essential to improving the world equitably. A new theory of change is needed: less from the top, more from the bottom. Young people need more “system change leaders” who facilitate change on the ground as role models, rather than unicorns and bosses at the top of large organizations in business, government and development agencies.

System change leaders are humble: they know that it is difficult to change embedded power structures. System leaders are enablers. They stimulate movements for change within their own communities. They bravely take small steps and encourage change in power relations in their own local world. There are already millions of such leaders in India. They are fireflies with their own inner light as a source of energy. They bring hope to their communities and spark waves of cooperative change. Like ripples in water, many such movements of change can combine into powerful waves of change to improve the world for all. We must encourage and support the fireflies around us.

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The main fuel tanks of NASA’s Artemis moon rocket are filled for the first launch https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-main-fuel-tanks-of-nasas-artemis-moon-rocket-are-filled-for-the-first-launch/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:20:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-main-fuel-tanks-of-nasas-artemis-moon-rocket-are-filled-for-the-first-launch/ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., Nov 15 (Reuters) – Ground crew at Kennedy Space Center filled the main fuel tanks of NASA’s massive next-generation moon rocket on Tuesday for its maiden launch, a flight to kick off the program Artemis from the US Space Agency. 50 years after the last Apollo lunar mission. The 32-story Space Launch […]]]>

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., Nov 15 (Reuters) – Ground crew at Kennedy Space Center filled the main fuel tanks of NASA’s massive next-generation moon rocket on Tuesday for its maiden launch, a flight to kick off the program Artemis from the US Space Agency. 50 years after the last Apollo lunar mission.

The 32-story Space Launch System (SLS) rocket was scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral, Florida at 1:04 a.m. EST (0604 GMT) on Wednesday to send its Orion capsule on a 25-day test flight around the moon and back. without astronauts on board.

NASA officials on Monday gave the “go” to continue flight preparations after 10 weeks plagued by multiple technical difficulties, back-to-back hurricanes and two excursions that brought the spacecraft out of its hangar at the launch pad.

Late in the countdown on Tuesday night, a hydrogen line leak was detected, leading NASA officials to send a “red team” of technicians to the launch pad to tighten a loose valve connection. . The ploy worked and the leak was fixed, NASA said.

Around the same time, crews overseeing the launch complex rushed to replace a malfunctioning internet connection, knocking a crucial radar system offline.

Launch attempts on August 29 and September 3 were aborted due to leaking fuel lines and other technical issues that NASA has since resolved. While docked at its launch pad last week, the rocket encountered high winds and rain from Hurricane Nicole, forcing a two-day flight postponement.

Weather is always a factor beyond NASA’s control. The latest forecast called for an 80% chance of favorable conditions during Wednesday’s two-hour launch window, NASA said.

On Tuesday afternoon, launch crews began the long and delicate process of loading the rocket’s core stage fuel tanks with hundreds of thousands of gallons of supercooled liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen propellant. .

About five hours before liftoff, those tanks were filled, marking a “major milestone” in launch preparations, a NASA spokesperson said. Crews continued to periodically refill the tanks to replenish small amounts of propellant as the liquid gases gradually evaporated as vapor.

Dubbed Artemis I, the mission marks the first flight of the SLS rocket and the Orion capsule together, built by Boeing Co (BA.N) and Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N), respectively, under contract with NASA.

It also signals a major shift in direction for NASA’s post-Apollo human spaceflight program after decades focused on low Earth orbit with space shuttles and the International Space Station. (See graph)

SUCCESSOR OF APOLLO

Named after the ancient Greek goddess of the hunt – and twin sister of Apollo – Artemis aims to bring astronauts back to the surface of the moon as early as 2025.

Twelve astronauts walked on the moon during six Apollo missions from 1969 to 1972, the only spaceflights to still place humans on the lunar surface. But Apollo, born out of the US-Soviet Cold War-era space race, was less science-driven than Artemis.

The new moon program has enlisted commercial partners such as Elon Musk’s SpaceX and space agencies in Europe, Canada and Japan to eventually establish a long-term lunar base as a springboard to even more ambitious human journeys to March.

Getting the SLS-Orion spacecraft off the ground is a key first step. Its maiden voyage is meant to put the vehicle through its paces in a rigorous test flight, pushing its design limits to prove the spacecraft is fit to fly astronauts.

If the mission is successful, a crewed flight of Artemis II around the moon could take place as soon as 2024, followed in a few years by the program’s first lunar landing of astronauts, including a woman, with Artemis III.

Considered the most powerful and complex rocket in the world, the SLS represents the largest new vertical launch system NASA has built since the Apollo-era Saturn V.

Barring any last-minute glitches, the launch countdown should end with the ignition of the rocket’s four main R-25 engines and its two solid rocket boosters, sending the spacecraft hurtling skyward.

About 90 minutes after liftoff, the rocket’s upper stage will propel Orion out of Earth orbit on course for a 25-day flight that will bring it within 60 miles (97 km) of the lunar surface before to sail 40,000 miles (64,374 km) beyond the moon and back to Earth. The capsule is scheduled to land on December 11.

Although no one is on board, Orion will carry a simulated crew of three – one male and two female mannequins – equipped with sensors to measure radiation levels and other stresses the astronauts would experience.

One of the main goals is to test the durability of Orion’s heat shield during re-entry as it hits Earth’s atmosphere at 24,500 miles (39,429 km) per hour, or 32 times the speed of sound. on its return from lunar orbit – much faster than re-entries from the space station.

The heat shield is designed to resist reentry friction that is expected to raise temperatures outside the capsule to nearly 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit (2,760 degrees Celsius).

Over a decade of development with years of delays and budget overruns, the SLS-Orion spacecraft has so far cost NASA at least $37 billion, including design, construction, testing and ground facilities. NASA’s Office of Inspector General has projected the total cost of Artemis at $93 billion by 2025.

NASA calls the program a boon to space exploration that has generated tens of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in trade.

Reporting by Joey Roulette in Cape Canaveral, Florida, and Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; Editing by Will Dunham and Gerry Doyle

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Russell Wilson’s bracelet, the Broncos’ anemic third offense and Peyton’s Places – The Denver Post https://stlouisrocketry.org/russell-wilsons-bracelet-the-broncos-anemic-third-offense-and-peytons-places-the-denver-post/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 18:05:18 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/russell-wilsons-bracelet-the-broncos-anemic-third-offense-and-peytons-places-the-denver-post/ Eleven things about the Broncos as they return to action in Tennessee and look to build on a pre-bye week win in London. 1. If you’re looking for a single statistical turnaround that could lead to a boost for Denver, consider the Broncos are No. 31 in the NFL in third-party conversion rate. Even that […]]]>

Eleven things about the Broncos as they return to action in Tennessee and look to build on a pre-bye week win in London.

1. If you’re looking for a single statistical turnaround that could lead to a boost for Denver, consider the Broncos are No. 31 in the NFL in third-party conversion rate. Even that doesn’t do the fight justice, though. In the past decade, only three NFL teams have finished a full season below Denver’s current mark of 29.2%.

2. “Conceptually we have to be a little smarter in that looking around the league you see a lot more area coverage instead of man coverage (on third down),” the coordinator said offensive Justin Outten. He identified a focus for personnel as, “Take advantage of those situations and have conceptual variety, where you can have a man-beater and an area-beater at the same time.”

3. In third and manageable, the Broncos are struggling thanks to a combination of a lack of timing and pace in their passing game and a lack of consistent rushing offense. The easiest way to keep drives in third is to have play call options, but even that hasn’t helped Denver so far.

4. OK, it’s not really rocket science here, but if you often fail third downs, it makes it hard to cap workouts with points. Denver is No. 28 in the NFL in that department, scoring on just 28% of its possessions so far this season, according to Pro Football Reference. That’s despite the Broncos having one of the lowest turnover rates (8.6% of possessions) in the game.

5. Maybe Russell Wilson’s bracelet will help. It’s a little ironic, but despite all the fuss over Pete Carroll’s comments and Wilson’s retort, having some of the more wordy play calls organized by number seems to make sense for Wilson and the coach- chef Nathaniel Hackett. Many NFL quarterbacks wear bracelets, including Hackett’s last guy, Aaron Rodgers of Green Bay.

6. “As a game designer sometimes you want to get a little creative and those things can get a little wordy,” Hackett said. … “Sometimes we get a little bit more detail on these things because sometimes we try to go a little crazy. So this allows you to do that. I think it also helps with crowd noise. If you have crowd noises, let him listen to me, he just has to hear a wristband number, then he can come in and communicate with the guys properly. There are many different things it is good for.

7. Now that the Broncos hold San Francisco’s first draft pick in 2023, it’s only natural to keep an eye on the Bay Area for the rest of the season to see where that stands. Denver has already done its part to help boost the value of this pick, beating the 49ers earlier in the season.

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Photo shows NASA’s stunning Artemis I rocket before launch https://stlouisrocketry.org/photo-shows-nasas-stunning-artemis-i-rocket-before-launch/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:00:25 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/photo-shows-nasas-stunning-artemis-i-rocket-before-launch/ NASA’s moon rocket Artemis I is back on the launch pad a week before its next scheduled liftoff attempt. For now, it will remain there, although that may change as crews monitor threats from a new subtropical storm. NASA photos from Friday, Nov. 4, show the 322-foot-tall rocket at the start and end of its […]]]>

NASA’s moon rocket Artemis I is back on the launch pad a week before its next scheduled liftoff attempt. For now, it will remain there, although that may change as crews monitor threats from a new subtropical storm.

NASA photos from Friday, Nov. 4, show the 322-foot-tall rocket at the start and end of its nine-hour, 4.2-mile journey inside NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Cape Canaveral, Florida. They describe the methodical work of the space agency‘s Exploration Ground Systems team during the transport of Artemis I.

The rocket is made up of a Space Launch System (SLS) and an Orion capsule, and the stacked duo traveled from the facility’s Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Launchpad 39B from 11:17 p.m. , Eastern Time, Thursday, Nov. 3. SLS and Moon-bound Orion will hopefully fly in their first integrated test early next week, Monday (November 14).

If Artemis I launches successfully next Monday, the mission will fly for 25.5 days to the Moon and back in an uncrewed demonstration with implications for future human lunar exploration.

NASA’s Artemis I, consisting of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft atop, rolls out of High Bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building late Thursday (November 3). Artemis I is larger than the Statue of Liberty, and crews spent more than nine hours maneuvering the vehicle the 4.2 miles from the building to Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.NASA/Isaac Watson

“During the flight, Orion will launch atop the world’s most powerful rocket and fly farther than any human-rated spacecraft has ever flown,” NASA Kennedy officials wrote in the two image descriptions on the space agency’s Flickr account, “paving the way for human exploration of deep space and demonstrating our commitment and ability to expand human presence on the Moon and beyond.

If the scale of the images is any indication, NASA goes to great lengths every time it needs to change the location of the rocket. Developing weather reports on Subtropical Storm Nicole may require ground crews to relocate Artemis I again.

Artemis I arrives on Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 4, 2022. According to NASA’s Artemis blog, the stacked Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule reached the launch pad at 8:30 a.m. Eastern Time. NASA/Isaac Watson

The rocket reached the launch pad Friday, Nov. 4 at 8:30 a.m. EST, and it was the first time Artemis I had been there since Sept. 26, when Hurricane Ian prompted personnel to evacuate and protect the rocket. Like Ian, Subtropical Storm Nicole triggered a hurricane, or HURCON, condition at KSC.

“NASA is working with the US Space Force and the National Hurricane Center to monitor Subtropical Storm Nicole,” NASA officials wrote in an Artemis I blog post published on Monday (November 8).

“Based on current forecast data, officials have determined that the Space Launch System rocket and Orion will remain at Launch Pad 39B. Kennedy teams will continue to monitor weather, ensure all personnel are safe, and assess status of the Monday November 14 launch attempt for the Artemis I mission as we move forward and receive updated weather forecasts,” they added.

NASA says it will provide updates on how it will proceed with the potential successor to Apollo.

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Three third-quarter interceptions spark Michigan football victory https://stlouisrocketry.org/three-third-quarter-interceptions-spark-michigan-football-victory/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 05:59:16 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/three-third-quarter-interceptions-spark-michigan-football-victory/ PISCATAWAY — Michigan’s No. 5 football team has focused all season on generating takeout. It didn’t quite pay obvious dividends: The Wolverines entered Saturday’s game with just five interceptions in eight games, tied for second in the Big Ten. Earlier this week, co-defensive coordinator and defensive backs coach Steve Clinkscale expressed even more urgency. In […]]]>

PISCATAWAY — Michigan’s No. 5 football team has focused all season on generating takeout. It didn’t quite pay obvious dividends: The Wolverines entered Saturday’s game with just five interceptions in eight games, tied for second in the Big Ten.

Earlier this week, co-defensive coordinator and defensive backs coach Steve Clinkscale expressed even more urgency. In an impassioned press conference, Clinkscale made it clear that the takeaway is on all three levels of defense — line, linebackers and secondary — doing their part.

“It’s defense, it’s not rocket science,” Clinkscale said. “Like, play your ass, play hard, get physical, find the ball, go play.”

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Detection and removal of stowaways in South Africa https://stlouisrocketry.org/detection-and-removal-of-stowaways-in-south-africa/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 20:11:10 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/detection-and-removal-of-stowaways-in-south-africa/ Stowaways on ships can present a cost and logistical problem for shipowners and ship captains, especially when trying to find a friend Port willing and able to accept and assist in repatriating these maritime intruders. Expensive and inefficient at the best of times, if a ship has to reorient itself and leave the trade, the […]]]>

Stowaways on ships can present a cost and logistical problem for shipowners and ship captains, especially when trying to find a friend Port willing and able to accept and assist in repatriating these maritime intruders. Expensive and inefficient at the best of times, if a ship has to reorient itself and leave the trade, the financial hole grows rapidly. Enter Patrick Mooney, Owner, APEX Stowaway Detection and his team Jack Russell Terrieras they are instrumental in finding and eliminating stowaways in South African ports.

Before starting Apex Stowaway Detection, Patrick Mooney was a police officer in South Africa for 20 years, and as part of the K9 unit, he was widely exposed to calls on the ground to remove unwanted individuals from ships in port.

“I worked in Durban on the east coast of KwaZulu-Natal, and we often had business before 9/11 and the ISPS code, to pick up undesirables who had embarked illegally in the port.”

After September 11with heightened barriers and security measures, Mooney said “the problem has actually gotten worse.”

This was the impetus to start his business, first as a side gig and eventually as a full time business with a full crew of people and dogs.

“When I wasn’t working, I formed a German shepherd that I had to locate intruders on a ship,” Mooney said. At the time, he had little maritime or shipboard experience, so he had to create his own training grounds in old warehouses to teach dogs. At the same time, he began cold calling ships in the harbor and local port agents, eventually getting a bite out of a ship in Durban. “I went down and located six individuals hiding on this ship. The news started circulating and I started getting quite a few calls. (At the time) it was myself and two buddies who were also police officers helping out, and as far as I know, we were the first people to do so in a private capacity in the world. It grew and grew to the point where I resigned from the force in 2009 and formed APEX Stowaway Detection.

Today, he said business is strong, with around 100 staff serving 85 to 110 ships a month.

Image courtesy of Apex Stowaway DetectionThe problem

According to Mooney, the problem of stowaways that he and his colleagues see in South African ports They are not stowaways seeking to leave the country for a better life, but rather the province of immigrant groups who use the gambit as a business model, demanding cash payments before boarding repatriation flights.
“In the early 2000s, if we had a stowaway in six months, that was a big deal. But slowly the numbers increased,” Mooney said.

He said that once the stowaway has boarded and the ship is sailing with them on board, the ship now takes responsibility for that person, including finding a friendly and suitable port to repatriate the passenger. clandestine.

“There are the direct costs, which will relate to the repatriation of the stowaway: getting a speedboat, getting escorts, getting security, getting tickets, hotel expenses, hiring the company that will take care of them at the airport, getting them back through…these costs vary.”

He said that in 2015 a stowaway was repatriated and the cost at the time was $24,000; in July 2022, two stowaways were repatriated to Tanzania at a cost of approximately $123,000.

“That’s the first part of it; the second part is non-letting, Mooney said. “If a ship has stowaways and needs to divert, it won’t be rented out by charterers, because the safety and stowaways on board are the direct responsibility of the owners of that ship. Suddenly the owner covers now all these rental costs, whether it’s fuel, salaries, day-to-day running of the ship, and that’s where the costs are now becoming astronomical.

Enter the covid pandemic, where even seafarers assigned to the ship were not allowed to disembark in the majority of ports around the world, and the cost of a stowaway increases exponentially. “We’ve had incidents where stowaways have been on a ship for almost a year; it’s a serious problem for a shipowner,” Mooney said.

Image courtesy of Apex Stowaway Detection

Gone to the dogs

When Mooney started his business, German Shepard was the breed of choice, mostly because that’s what he worked with in the police department. “They’re smart, they learn fast and I knew the way we trained them.”

But the onboard environment, with a multitude of small spaces and below-deck heat that can easily go north of 100F in the area, was not optimal for the breed. “I soon realized that using a German Shepherd on board a ship was just not practical; the dog would be overheated within 15 minutes and he couldn’t work, plus we were having trouble getting them into the cargo hatches,” Mooney said.

Personally, he had a Jack Russell terrier, dogs bred to hunt foxes in packs, dogs that learn quickly, are very tough and can go for long periods of time without resting.

“We had a ship in Richards Bay where the team pulled up, they got the dogs out of the trailer, they put the harnesses on them and they went up the gangway, straight over the superstructure and started barking at an air conditioning duct,” where, after being cut off by the crew, two stowaways were found, Mooney said. “If they know they’re going to work, they’re completely excited. And they are practical. We make them make harnesses, they clip on the guys doing the searching. They can climb up and down ladders in cargo holds; they have a torch on one side and a Jack Russell on the other. I mean, that’s it. It’s that simple. It’s not rocket science. They are very reliable.

Different sizes and types of vessels require drastically different scanning patterns, as controlling a bulk carrier, for example, can take significantly less time than a vehicle-filled RoRo. That said, Mooney estimates that a team of 6 people and 4 dogs can clear a ship in two to three hours.

“We would board at least six to eight hours before this ship’s departure time, and we would say to the captain, ‘Once these stevedores are finished in the first hold, we will put our team there.’

Once sweeping is complete, seals are placed on all access points, hatches and manholes. “We will continue systematically as they finish (loading the ship) because with the shipowners, when they finish loading the cargo of the ship, they want it to leave the dock and leave as soon as as possible.”

As for the costs of his services, Mooney said they vary depending on the size of the vessel and the time his crew spends on board, but for a normal sweep, “you’re looking at around $600 or so.”


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Do you plan to collect web data? Do some homework first https://stlouisrocketry.org/do-you-plan-to-collect-web-data-do-some-homework-first/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 10:17:12 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/do-you-plan-to-collect-web-data-do-some-homework-first/ Q&A with Denas Grybauskas, Legal Manager at Oxylabs Large amounts of data are collected every minute using web scraping. From product prices on different online stores to SEO keyword rankings, public web data enables businesses to make both tactical and strategic decisions, helping them outperform their competitors. However, with the collection of such data comes […]]]>

Q&A with Denas Grybauskas, Legal Manager at Oxylabs

Large amounts of data are collected every minute using web scraping. From product prices on different online stores to SEO keyword rankings, public web data enables businesses to make both tactical and strategic decisions, helping them outperform their competitors. However, with the collection of such data comes a responsibility. Besides being a sensitive issue in itself, data collection lacks comprehensive legal regulation or a clear industry consensus on what is acceptable and what is not.

Denas Grybauskas, the legal director of a major provider of public web data collection solutions Oxylabsexplains why it is always useful to consult a legal professional before embarking on your scrapping activities.

What does the web scraping industry look like today?

Web scraping has gone from a niche to an almost conventional form. In some industries, like e-commerce, over 80% of businesses use web scraping in their day-to-day operations. From the world’s largest companies to startups, the demand for web scraping services is huge and growing as more companies discover the potential of this technology.

The growing demand, in turn, drives innovation in the field. As new use cases emerge, opportunities for improvement arise. Web scraping tools are more efficient, simple and reliable today than they were 5 years ago, with increased use of artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies.

What are the main legal challenges regarding web scraping and data collection?

The main challenge is to answer a simple question: can I recover this particular data? Web scraping is relatively new and therefore shares the same problem with other new technologies – regulation develops much more slowly than the technology itself.

In practice, a company that collects public web data must take into account several legal aspects and check whether it complies with them. From the US Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) to the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and other privacy rules, in addition to regulations that differ from region to region, there is a long list of laws that might become relevant in specific circumstances. .

Not only is the list ongoing, but many other laws could be considered depending on a particular data collection situation. Appropriate regulation explicitly dedicated to web scraping or a clear industry consensus and establishment of industry best practices would alleviate such a headache.

Another legal challenge comes from the growing pressure on Big Tech from governments around the world. There will likely be pressure for new regulations, particularly regarding personal data, its acquisition and aggregation. The data collection industry should not turn a blind eye to these processes. In light of government pressure, some big tech companies may already be restricting access to public web data, which could affect many businesses.

Have there been any recent developments in the web scraping legal landscape?

In the spring, headlines about whether “web scraping is officially legal” appeared in some major tech outlets. It was a reaction to the ruling of the US Ninth Circuit of Appeals in the legal battle between LinkedIn and HiQ Labs. HiQ Labs used public data from LinkedIn user profiles to gain insights into employee attrition. LinkedIn has raised numerous complaints about this scraping activity. However, the main argument was that scraping this data amounted to hacking.

Once again, the Court of Appeals found that the scraping of publicly available data did not violate the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) as LinkedIn had attempted to prove. Some respected the ruling as if it “officially legalized web scraping.”

While this is a great move for the scraping industry, it just reaffirms what most players in the tech industry probably already knew: public data scraping and hacking shouldn’t be treated the same. way. These actions are completely different and should have entirely different legal implications.

What advice or tips would you give to companies that want to start collecting web data?

I would advise consulting a legal professional first. It is better to verify the extent of the data collected and the legality surrounding it than to regret the consequences.

The first assessment is necessary when defining the data to be collected. Try to determine what type of data you actually plan to recover. Is there a risk that personal data will be collected? If so, can you minimize and anonymize this data? Second, is any data protected by copyright? If so, is it possible to avoid collecting it, etc.?

Another part of the questions would relate to the sources from which you plan to collect data. What kind of websites are they and what do their terms and conditions say? Do you need to login to the website to access the necessary data?

Finally, ask yourself if there are any upcoming regulations and court rulings that you should be aware of. Always consider the region and how the regulations differ in the US, Europe, Asia, etc.

These questions may seem difficult to answer, which is why it is always beneficial to have a legal professional nearby. Companies should ensure that their scraping processes comply with the latest case law and applicable regulations.

Oxylabs often uses the term “ethical web scraping”. What is the distinction between legal and ethics?

Not everything that is legal can be considered ethical. Data can be a very sensitive issue. Therefore, the industry should go beyond what is legal and have clear ethical principles for scraping operations.

With few exceptions, scraping only publicly available information is one of the fundamental rules of ethical web scraping. Businesses need to ensure that data is requested at a fair rate and does not compromise the web server. They should also study the terms of use of the website and decide if they can be accepted. Finally, they should use ethically obtained proxies.

How do you see the future of web scraping regulation?

I cannot foresee the imminent emergence of specialized regulations on web scraping. However, industry proactivity in terms of ethics and standards will be essential.

For example, Oxylabs and the four other key players in the market – Zyte, Smartproxy, Coresignal and Sprious – recently launched the Ethical Web Data Collection Initiative (EWDCI). The co-founders will aim to promote industry best practices with the highest ethical standards in mind.

The doors are now open to all companies that, in one way or another, rely on web scraping technology to join the ranks of the Web Data Collection Initiative and protect the industry from interior. Web scraping is rocket science for politicians. Therefore, if we want more clarity on the regulation of our industry, we should help the government create it.

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Ted Cruz wants to be popular. Why is it so bad? – Texas Monthly https://stlouisrocketry.org/ted-cruz-wants-to-be-popular-why-is-it-so-bad-texas-monthly/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 21:40:38 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/ted-cruz-wants-to-be-popular-why-is-it-so-bad-texas-monthly/ The list of things one might have respect for Senator Ted Cruz for is short. On some level, I think he knows. (He’s smart, isn’t he? Everyone insists he’s smart!) I think that’s why he often tries to gain some reluctant goodwill by playing a good sport, like when he accepted the meme that he […]]]>

The list of things one might have respect for Senator Ted Cruz for is short. On some level, I think he knows. (He’s smart, isn’t he? Everyone insists he’s smart!) I think that’s why he often tries to gain some reluctant goodwill by playing a good sport, like when he accepted the meme that he was the zodiac killer, or when he played offered his impressions of The Simpsons to BuzzFeed. He sat down for interviews with me three times! Back in the more forgiving pre-Trump years, he was on Stephen Colbert’s show and Seth Meyers’; he played basketball (in fashion) with Jimmy Kimmel. And on Monday he went on the ABC talk show View.

You might think daytime television would be a relatively sweet place to promote a book, even if that book is Cruz’s latest, Corrupt Justice: How the Left Armed Our Justice System. But the quintet of close ladies who received Cruz have made fun of him many times over the years, and while their politics vary somewhat, they are generally anti-Trump and pro-January 6 committee. That Trump would somehow try to thwart the committee’s subpoena was, in fact, what they were talking about before Cruz joined them. I can’t prove, but I suspect whoever booked Cruz knew he was putting the senator in the lionesses’ den. Cruz must have known it too.

For starters, Ana Navarro referenced her reception at the Astros-Yankees game in New York on Sunday night (“Go back to Cancún!” was the the most beautiful thing the crowd yelled at her.) Her appearance ended with Whoopi Goldberg interrupting one of Cruz’s mid-sentence Trump defenses to wave a copy of her book to the audience and tell them, apologetically, “You get a copy.” It was briefly interrupted by climate protesters; since everyone on stage ignored them, it was probably the least hostile exchange of the hour.

I don’t think he answered a single question. Sara Haines asked what he would say to “voters who say expect economic cycles. . . but is it fundamentally un-American that a woman’s rights can fluctuate from state to state? His answer was about inflation. Alyssa Farah Griffin, Trump’s former White House aide, asked him if Joe Biden’s election was legitimate. Cruz said, “Biden is the president.”

When Navarro played a clip of Cruz slamming Trump for insulting his wife in 2016 and asking him, “Were you lying then, or are you lying now?”, Cruz said he had a responsibility to voters to “do my job” no matter who was on the job. That’s a great answer, though it’s claimed more credibly by a number of elected officials who define their job as something other than “making Trump happy at all costs.” (He also said, “I’ll tell you, Heidi laughed” when Trump rebuked her. Just us people who can crack a joke here!)

Most of the questions were about Cruz whipping Trump. Even Republican Griffin stood up to the fire (“I made peace with those decisions,” she noted contritely). She followed her admission that she backed Cruz in 2016 with a sharp contrast between her lip service to the Constitution and her complicity in seeking to overturn the 2020 election: “How,” she said. asked, “Can you agree with an undemocratic action of trying to disenfranchise eighty million voters? (His non-response: “Read the chapter [in my book] January 6th. “)

I find myself wanting to give Cruz credit for withstanding the onslaught when he sits down in enemy territory like this – but, then, that’s exactly what he wants. It’s his calculation when he accepts these invitations. At some point, such schemes stop being signs that you’re capable of taking a punch and start looking more like slip-and-fall insurance fraud.

His glued smile did not falter. His body language conveyed the practiced casualness of someone working on these things in front of a mirror. And maybe he had. In his obligatory 2015 campaign prep memoir, Cruz tells a story the first half of which would resonate with anyone who grew up one of the smartest kids in the class (and here I’ll shyly raise my hand). Like many of us once considered “gifted and talented,” he struggled to control his enthusiasm and pride in schoolwork. I also know Cruz’s other recognized weakness: being “bad at sports”. As he says, “[t]hat mix was. . . not a recipe for popularity.

Relative, right? Then he will remind you that he is not like you and me; it’s Ted Cruz. “In the middle of college,” he wrote, “I decided I had had enough of being the unpopular nerd. I remember . . . ask a friend why I wasn’t one of the popular kids. I ended up staying up most of the night thinking about it. ‘Okay, well, what do the popular kids do? I will consciously imitate that. ”

That’s the story I tell when people ask me what I think of Cruz’s stubborn insensitivity, though it also strikes at least a chord with me. Many of us know what it’s like to worry about being unpopular. What makes Cruz stand out as an alien (or the Zodiac Killer) isn’t just his distrust of his plan (“imitate”!) but that to this day he thinks it was an unqualified success.

“I tried to be less cocky. When I got a test exam, even though I probably did well, I just put it away. I wouldn’t watch it. It wasn’t rocket science, but it was interesting to see what these sorts of small conscious changes could produce.

Again, there’s something vaguely human about learning not to brag about your good grades, an impression he quickly ruins by talking about his social life as if it were a laboratory experiment. Cruz also seems to misunderstand that a middle-aged U.S. senator bragging about cracking the popularity code in college could mean he’s even more insufferable now than he was before.

Ted Cruz makes an appearance in The View
Ted Cruz with The View hosts on October 24, 2022.Lou Rocco/ABC

The nadir of the See The segment was likely when, after repeated questions and outbursts from the hosts about the GOP’s acquiescence to election deniers, Cruz ripped a folded sheet of white paper from his coat and began reading examples of Democrats who have at a moment questioned the results of the elections. At this point, there was a lot of shouting overlapping around the table, so I didn’t catch everything he was saying, although I heard at least two references to Hillary Clinton and Biden criticizing the 2000 election.

Let’s leave aside the emptiness of this supposed “gotcha” (unless you remember something about the consequences of the Al Gore concession that I don’t). Let’s talk about Cruz trying to settle an argument by pulling a set of prop notes out of his pocket like he’s Matlock.

Before you tell me that, well, maybe it was an honest reminder for the senator: no, no, no. Ted Cruz doesn’t need to be spurred on by his arguments. He issued an obstruction. He was Solicitor General of Texas. In middle school, he toured Kiwanis and Rotary clubs and recited the Constitution from memory. Cruz closed with “a patriotic poem”, “I am an American”, set to lively music. (How could this kid be unpopular?)

So his notes were a prop. And that gesture says more about Cruz than it intended, although, to be honest, I’m not sure of the intended message. Did he think wielding a physical document would stun his opponents into silence? Or make his case more legitimate? “I didn’t know if I believed Ted Cruz, but then I saw he was right. written on a sheet of paper. »

But his intentions have been eclipsed, once again, by the fact that he was so cowardly, so determined to succeed that he cannot even claim humility. He knew he was walking into an ambush, he knew he would need some kind of backup, and he thought the paper in the breast pocket trick would work. He didn’t want to listen; he wanted to win. He didn’t continue View to show the libs that he could laugh with them. He continued View to own them.

It is a testament to our current state of mindless partisanship that it seems to have worked. Today, conservative sites broadcast sound clips See appearance with such titles as “Ted Cruz Crushes ‘The View’ Hosts & Triggers Woke Audiences” and “Watch ‘The View’ Hosts Lose It When Ted Cruz Shows Them Facts.” These reactions don’t suggest admiration or affection for Cruz so much as an artificial intelligence program performing a name search and replacement for the conservative figure who recently managed to drive liberals crazy. Cruz’s appearance was a form of “popular kid impersonation,” when you decided the only kind of popularity that matters is being on Fox News.

For his part, Cruz has learned enough not to express his desire to be loved. No, he continued View because – as he told Fox News (!) – curators need to “reach a much wider audience”. Reaching, but not respecting, as Cruz also pointed out that his hosts were more shaken up by hecklers than he was and that he found Whoopi Goldberg’s refusal to commit to the ‘antifa riots’ so ridiculous “I only had to ‘to laugh.”

It makes me sad to think that young Ted Cruz is so committed to success that he couldn’t even imagine making friends was anything more than an ace assignment. I’m less sad when I remember it’s still how Ted Cruz thinks of others – and when I think to what ends he hopes to obtain the popularity he seeks.

Ana Marie Cox is a columnist for The Cut and author of Dog Days: A Novel and a forthcoming memoir.

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Betty Ann Blaine | It’s not rocket science – it’s parenthood | On point https://stlouisrocketry.org/betty-ann-blaine-its-not-rocket-science-its-parenthood-on-point/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 05:06:27 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/betty-ann-blaine-its-not-rocket-science-its-parenthood-on-point/ Over the past few weeks, the media and the general public have been rightly in turmoil over the increase in school violence occurring in different parts of the country. The case of a teenage girl stabbed to death by a classmate during school time has sent shock waves inside and outside Jamaica. ARMED The tragic […]]]>

Over the past few weeks, the media and the general public have been rightly in turmoil over the increase in school violence occurring in different parts of the country. The case of a teenage girl stabbed to death by a classmate during school time has sent shock waves inside and outside Jamaica.

ARMED

The tragic and disturbing incident was quickly followed by a newspaper report reporting gang-affiliated high school students carrying guns, knives and ice picks while on the grounds of the school, supposedly arming themselves to fight against their rivals.

As the problem escalates, everyone seems to be searching for answers while ignoring some obvious solutions.

Violence does not fall from the sky. Experts agree that it is a developmental process that begins in early childhood. Teenagers with violent behavior have mostly been victims of violence themselves, often from an early age.

Children born and raised in unstable communities, whether urban or rural, are accustomed to violence long before puberty, even when their own homes may be free of violence.

In urban settings, the cramped physical configuration of dwellings, not to mention the clutter of life in the courtyard of buildings, exposes children to a plethora of daily quarrels and arguments, many of which result in fights, beatings, knife and sometimes death.

TENDENCY TO BE HARSH

Children born and raised in inner cities have to be tough, and that includes girls. It’s survival of the fittest and they learn the art quickly. Disputes are settled by brute force, not only through physical violence, but also through harsh verbal incitements.

Violence at home breeds violence at school. It’s not rocket science. Children fed a regular diet of violence will play what is natural and normal for them. The school compound is simply another geographical space with no bearing on how one is supposed to behave. If disputes cannot be settled at home, they can certainly be settled at school.

The interesting finding is that schools grappling with the problem of school violence simultaneously hold the keys to the solution.

It starts with some basic questions and critical data. Who are these students at my school who are known to be violent? What percentage do they represent of the general school population? What is their academic profile? Do they go to school regularly? Who do they hang out with during school time? How do I train my staff to spot the warning signs of violent behavior, especially gate security guards and auxiliary staff? These questions, among other data leading to personalized records, are essential for targeted interventions.

WHERE ARE THE PARENTS?

The most critical issues relate to parenthood. Who and where are the parents? What do we know about them, if any? Is there a history of violence in the family? What is the relationship between parent and child?

After identifying the children and their parents, a carefully designed intervention program should be continued to include professional counseling as well as social service support for the families.

It’s a proven fact that even older teens are salvageable. Young people treated with love and respect produce unimaginable results.

My personal experience of designing and running a project for single men aged 15-25 has amazed sponsors and stakeholders at the achievements. Most beneficiaries have found jobs and have spoken publicly about how the project has transformed their lives. They even formed a youth group themselves called Youth For Change. The project would win a World Bank award for best practices in the hemisphere.

There is nothing wrong with our children. They live what they learn, and for many the lessons are dangerously negative. The vast majority of young Jamaicans who attend school are normal young people who want to learn and who have dreams and aspirations characteristic of youth.

Jamaica does not have a problem with juvenile delinquency. What we have is a family problem, and when we fix family life, we don’t just fix young people, we fix our country.

The majority of children in the country live with a parent or parents in homes and communities. When parents succeed, children succeed. School violence doesn’t require calling in rocket scientists. This requires a call to good parenting.

– Betty Ann Blaine is a children’s rights advocate and founder of Hear The Children’s Cry and Youth Opportunities Unlimited (YOU). Send your comments to columns@gleanerjm.com.

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Rose Rocketry Set for Liftoff in the NASA Student Launch Competition https://stlouisrocketry.org/rose-rocketry-set-for-liftoff-in-the-nasa-student-launch-competition/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 15:28:59 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/rose-rocketry-set-for-liftoff-in-the-nasa-student-launch-competition/ Increased student interest and lessons learned from the past year have Rose Rocketry Club members excited to launch their aspirations to participate in NASA’s 2023 Student Launch Challenge. The team is well on its way to achieving its goals of designing, building and flying a high-powered amateur rocket that carries a scientific payload to an […]]]>

Increased student interest and lessons learned from the past year have Rose Rocketry Club members excited to launch their aspirations to participate in NASA’s 2023 Student Launch Challenge.

The team is well on its way to achieving its goals of designing, building and flying a high-powered amateur rocket that carries a scientific payload to an altitude of between 4,000 and 6,000 feet. The nine-month challenge will conclude with an on-site launch near NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama in April 2023.

This is the second year in a row that the Rose Rocketry Club has been selected from among 69 student teams representing 25 states and Puerto Rico participating in the challenge.

Rose Rocketry student leaders admit they were overwhelmed by complexities involving technical aspects during last year’s inaugural effort, with the team failing to meet the competition’s launch requirements due to parachute failure.

“Cohesion between team members has already improved compared to last year and with a preliminary design almost ready to be built and tested, we expect a successful year,” said the club president. , Sam Betts, third-year mechanical engineering student. “We needed people, subsystems and funding to succeed in a competition of this magnitude. We are well on our way to achieving these goals. »

Student recruitment brought in a team of 40 students from various academic disciplines in engineering and science. Executive positions cover every system in the project, and members of the Rose Tech Radio Club consult on important in-flight communications. Team management also made an important design decision to limit the length of the rocket to six feet.

“We made other tough design decisions early in the production process and are now focused on the prototyping and competition design stages. We have clear and manageable timelines between the launch challenge deadlines. NASA students,” Betts said. “It’s been a total team effort this year.”

The club president added: “I can’t explain how excited I am for this year’s competition. I have already seen our members’ interest in aeronautics and competition, and I enjoyed getting to know new people and their interests. We worked hard on the proposal (entry to the initial competition) and everything went much smoother than last year. I desperately want to make it to the launch part of the competition this year.

Each year, NASA updates the contest payload challenge to reflect the technologies needed for existing missions. This year, students must design a payload capable of autonomously receiving radio frequency commands and performing a series of tasks with an on-board camera. Teams must declare a target altitude for their rocket on final launch day, with the team closest to their prediction winning the Altitude Award. Additional rewards are given to deserving teams for vehicle design, experience design, and social media presence. Teams should conduct outreach programs to educate local communities.

“This competition has the potential to transform students into highly skilled professionals for the modern workplace,” said Fred Kepner, operations manager for Student Launch at Marshall, in a NASA press release. “Many former students are now working with NASA or our industrial partners across the country, some supporting the next chapter in space exploration, the Artemis program.”

Joining Betts as team leaders are Vice President Chirag Sirigere, a senior computer engineering student; Treasurer Garrett Hart, a junior electrical engineering graduate; mechanical payload sub-team secretary and leader Everest Zang, a second-year mechanical engineering student; security guard and vehicle sub-team leader Ben Graham, a young computer science student; public affairs officer Gabriel Woller, a second-year mechanical engineering student; and electronics/radio frequency payload subteam leader Jake Armstrong, a sophomore in computer engineering.

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Support the Rose Rocketry team by donating to: https://fundraise.givesmart.com/vf/RHITCompTeams/team/Rocketry

(Funds will help members attend conferences, travel to the final competition, develop plans for a rocket to reach 10,000 feet in flight, and help members achieve high-powered rocket level certification. 2).

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