Rocket Ship – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:09:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png Rocket Ship – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 SpaceX scraps Falcon 9 launch attempt with Eutelsat satellite – Spaceflight Now https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-scraps-falcon-9-launch-attempt-with-eutelsat-satellite-spaceflight-now/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:09:04 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-scraps-falcon-9-launch-attempt-with-eutelsat-satellite-spaceflight-now/ Live coverage of the countdown and launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida. The Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Eutelsat 10B broadband communications satellite for aeronautical and maritime connectivity. follow us on Twitter. DFS live SpaceX’s oldest active Falcon 9 rocket booster, […]]]>

Live coverage of the countdown and launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida. The Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Eutelsat 10B broadband communications satellite for aeronautical and maritime connectivity. follow us on Twitter.

DFS live

SpaceX’s oldest active Falcon 9 rocket booster, in service since 2018, is scheduled to make its final flight Tuesday evening to orbit a Eutelsat broadband communications satellite as part of a mission to provide internet services to aircraft and ships across the North Atlantic, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The mission will complete a series of four major satellite launches for Eutelsat since early September.

The Eutelsat 10B satellite is scheduled to lift off atop a Falcon 9 rocket at 9:57 p.m. EST Tuesday (02:57 GMT Wednesday) from pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. Eutelsat 10B is heading to a perch in geostationary orbit to transmit communications signals across a coverage area from the North Atlantic to Asia, using more than 100 spot beams to connect airline and ship passengers from cruisers, maritime crews and other users on the move.

A Monday night launch attempt was canceled hours before liftoff to “allow for additional pre-flight checks,” SpaceX said.

SpaceX will not recover the first stage of the 70-meter-tall Falcon 9 rocket. The launch company has reached an agreement with Eutelsat to devote all of the Falcon 9’s lift capacity to sending the Eutelsat 10B satellite into as high an orbit as possible, with no reserves or thrusters on the first stage for landing maneuvers.

There is only a 20% chance of favorable weather conditions for the launch on Tuesday night, according to the official outlook from the US Space Force’s 45th Weather Squadron.

A few miles north of Pad 40, SpaceX is preparing another Falcon 9 rocket for launch Tuesday from Kennedy Space Center on a resupply mission to the International Space Station. The weather forecast for that launch, set for 3:54 p.m. EST (2054 GMT) on Tuesday, is also uncertain with a 30% chance of acceptable conditions for liftoff.

Eutelsat 10B will roll out from the upper stage of the Falcon 9 rocket approximately 35 minutes after launch. The rocket will aim to release the spacecraft into a “super synchronous” transfer orbit with an apogee, or furthest point from Earth, well above Eutelsat 10B’s final operating altitude of 22,000 miles. (nearly 36,000 kilometers). The target apogee of the Eutelsat 10B mission when the spacecraft deploys will be over 37,000 miles, or about 60,000 kilometers, according to Pascal Homsy, Eutelsat’s chief technical officer.

Instead of reserving some of its thruster for landing on a drone, Falcon 9’s first-stage thruster will burn through its nine main engines a few seconds longer than usual, giving extra speed to the rocket’s upper stage. This will allow the Falcon 9 second stage engine to place the Eutelsat 10B satellite into a higher orbit than would otherwise have been possible.

SpaceX still plans to salvage the two halves of the Falcon 9 rocket’s payload fairing for refurbishment and reuse.

Artist’s impression of the Eutelsat 10B satellite with its antennas and solar panels deployed in orbit. Credit: Thales Alenia Space

A spokesperson for Thales Alenia Space, the maker of Eutelsat 10B, said deploying the satellite to a super synchronous transfer orbit would cut the time it takes to reach its final operational geostationary orbit by around 10 days. Based on Thales’ Spacebus Neo satellite platform, Eutelsat 10B will use plasma thrusters for the orbit adjustments needed to circularize its orbit to a geostationary altitude of 22,000 miles above the equator, where it will around the Earth at the rate of the rotation of the planet.

Eutelsat 10B’s total launch mass is about 5.5 metric tons, or about 12,000 pounds, a Thales spokesperson told Spaceflight Now on Monday.

The Falcon 9 expendable mission will be the third time this month that SpaceX has had a Falcon rocket booster, following intentional disposals of a core stage on a Falcon Heavy rocket on Nov. 1 and a Falcon 9 booster on mission November 12. The Nov. 12 mission sent two communications satellites for Intelsat, which said it paid a premium for the extra performance of the Falcon 9, which resulted in the booster being knocked out in the Atlantic Ocean.

“The reason Eutelsat chose expendable propellant for this mission is the mass of the satellite, which requires the full fuel capacity and additional performance of the Falcon 9 rocket and proper on-orbit injection,” Homsy told Spaceflight Now. in response to written questions.

Homsy declined to say how much, if any, Eutelsat paid SpaceX for the additional Falcon 9 performance on the Eutelsat 10B mission.

Once in geostationary orbit next year, Eutelsat 10B will head to an operational position along the equator at 10 degrees east longitude. The satellite will add capacity for Internet connectivity services for aircraft and ships across the busy North Atlantic corridor between Europe and North America. Eutelsat 10B will also provide similar services over Europe, the Mediterranean basin and the Middle East, according to Paris-based satellite owner and operator Eutelsat.

Eutelsat 10B carries two high-speed Ku-band multi-beam payloads for aeronautical and maritime Internet services. These two payloads have 116 spot beams capable of handling more than 50 GHz of bandwidth and delivering throughput of around 35 gigabits per second, Eutelsat said.

The satellite also hosts two wide-beam C-band and Ku-band payloads to extend the services currently provided by the aging Eutelsat 10A satellite, launched in 2009.

Eutelsat 10B is expected to enter service in the summer of 2023, Homsy said.

The Eutelsat 10B communications satellite inside an antenna test range at Thales Alenia Space in Cannes, France. Credit: Eutelsat

The launch of Eutelsat 10B marks Eutelsat’s fourth major communications satellite to be launched in the last two and a half months, starting with the Eutelsat Konnect VHTS satellite which was launched in September on an Ariane 5 rocket. broadcasters Hotbird TV joined the Eutelsat fleet after launches from Florida on Falcon 9 rockets in October and earlier this month.

“Quite a challenge for Eutelsat’s engineering teams, who rose to the challenge,” said Homsy.

During Tuesday night’s countdown, the Falcon 9 launch vehicle will be filled with one million pounds of kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants in the final 35 minutes before liftoff.

Assuming teams verify that technical and weather parameters are all “green” for launch, the nine Merlin 1D main engines of the first stage thruster will be brought to life using an ignition fluid called triethylaluminum/triethylborane, or TEA-TEB. Once the engines reach full throttle, the hydraulic grippers will open to release the Falcon 9 for its ascent into space.

The nine main engines will produce 1.7 million pounds of thrust for more than two and a half minutes, propelling the Falcon 9 and Eutelsat 10B into the upper atmosphere. Then the booster stage will shut down and separate from the Falcon 9 upper stage to begin an uncontrolled drop into the Atlantic.

The booster is not equipped with SpaceX’s recovery hardware, such as titanium grid fins or landing legs. And SpaceX did not deploy any of its drones for the expendable mission.

SpaceX is expected to attempt to recover the payload fairing from the Falcon 9 rocket after the two nose cone shell halves parachuted into the sea below Cape Canaveral. The payload fairing will be jettisoned from the rocket about three and a half minutes into flight, shortly after the Falcon 9 upper stage engine fires.

The Falcon 9 rocket will fire its upper-stage engine twice to inject the Eutelsat 10B spacecraft into an elliptical super-synchronous transfer orbit, then the satellite will deploy from the rocket. Eutelsat 10B will deploy its solar arrays and begin maneuvers with an onboard electric propulsion system to circularize its orbit at a geostationary altitude approximately 22,000 miles above the equator.

ROCKET: Falcon 9 (B1049.11)

PAYLOAD: Eutelsat 10B communications satellite

LAUNCH SITE: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida

RELEASE DATE: November 22, 2022

LAUNCH TIME: 9:57 p.m. EST (02:57 GMT)

WEATHER FORECAST: 20% chance of acceptable weather conditions

BOOSTER RECOVERY: None

LAUNCH AZIMUTH: East

TARGET ORBIT: Super Synchronous Transfer Orbit

LAUNCH TIMETABLE:

    • T+00:00: Takeoff
    • T+01:16: Maximum air pressure (Max-Q)
    • T+02:43: First stage main engine shutdown (MECO)
    • T+02:47: Stage Separation
    • T+02:54: Second stage engine ignition
    • T+03:36: Fairing jettison
    • T+08:05: Second stage motor shutdown (SECO 1)
    • T+26:18: Second stage motor restart
    • T+27:27: Second stage motor shutdown (SECO 2)
    • T+35:28: Separation Eutelsat 10B

MISSION STATS:

  • 186th launch of a Falcon 9 rocket since 2010
  • 195th launch of the Falcon family of rockets since 2006
  • 11th launch of the Falcon 9 booster B1049
  • Launch of the 159th Falcon 9 from the Space Coast of Florida
  • Launch of the 104th Falcon 9 from pad 40
  • 159th total launch from pad 40
  • 127th flight of a repurposed Falcon 9 booster
  • 5th SpaceX launch for Eutelsat
  • Launch of the 52nd Falcon 9 in 2022
  • 53rd launch by SpaceX in 2022
  • 51st orbital launch attempt based at Cape Canaveral in 2022

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Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.

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Rocket Report: Long March 6A crashes after launch; SLS flies away for its debut https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-report-long-march-6a-crashes-after-launch-sls-flies-away-for-its-debut/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 12:00:15 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-report-long-march-6a-crashes-after-launch-sls-flies-away-for-its-debut/ Enlarge / The Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft lift away from Kennedy Space Center on Wednesday morning. Trevor Mahlman Welcome to Rocket Report 5.18! What a year of spaceflight this has been. In late 2021, a European rocket successfully sent the James Webb Space Telescope into space, and 11 months later, NASA’s Space […]]]>
Enlarge / The Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft lift away from Kennedy Space Center on Wednesday morning.

Trevor Mahlman

Welcome to Rocket Report 5.18! What a year of spaceflight this has been. In late 2021, a European rocket successfully sent the James Webb Space Telescope into space, and 11 months later, NASA’s Space Launch System performed a target launch. This wraps up two massive development projects that I’ve tracked for much of my career as a space writer, and it’s so nice that both have a happy ending.

Please note that there will be no newsletter next week due to the Thanksgiving holiday.

As always, we Reader Submissions Welcome, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please sign up using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP versions of the site). Each report will contain information on small, medium and heavy rockets as well as a quick overview of the next three launches on the schedule.

Spaceport Cornwall Obtains Operator License. Spaceport Cornwall will be allowed to host the UK’s first space launch after obtaining an operating license from the Civil Aviation Authority, BBC reporting. This was a necessary step in the regulatory process, but not the last, before Virgin Orbit could fly its cosmic girl plane from England and send its LauncherOne rocket into orbit.

One step closer to launch … The license allows Virgin Orbit to undertake mission readiness preparations and conduct on-site testing. The company does not yet have a launch license, but the aviation authority said it was at “a very advanced stage” of granting launch and range licenses. “So we’re still looking at late November or early December, as long as all the technology is ready to go,” said Melissa Thorpe, head of Spaceport Cornwall. (submitted by Ken the Bin and EllPeaTea)

A small satellite launched by electrons reaches the Moon. After a nearly five-month journey, far beyond the Moon and back, the small CAPSTONE spacecraft successfully entered lunar orbit, ARS reports. The spacecraft was launched in late June on an Electron rocket from New Zealand. Notably, Electron is the smallest rocket to launch a payload to the Moon, and its manufacturer, Rocket Lab, has emphasized the capabilities of the booster and its Photon upper stage to the maximum to send CAPSTONE on its long journey to the moon. This was Rocket Lab’s first deep space mission.

Special delivery to a special orbit … This spacecraft was built by Advanced Space and ended up in an important orbit for NASA: a near-rectilinear halo orbit. It’s special because this orbit is really stable, requiring only a tiny amount of propellant to maintain position. At its closest point to the Moon, this roughly week-long orbit passes within 3,000 km of the lunar surface, and at other points it is 70,000 km. NASA plans to build a small space station, called Lunar Gateway, here later this decade.

The easiest way to follow Eric Berger’s space reporting is to sign up for his newsletter, we’ll collect his stories for your inbox.

SpaceRyde Inks Launch Contract. Canadian launch startup SpaceRyde this week revealed plans to launch four private commercial flights for ISILaunch, Space News reports. Customers will pay $250,000 to launch 25kg payloads on SpaceRyde’s Ryder rocket and Flying Spider balloon. Flights are expected to begin in 2024. For these SpaceRyde flights, ISILaunch will offer customization including planning weeks before launch, access to custom orbits and various fairing configurations.

Fill a gap ? … “SpaceRyde is thrilled to join ISILaunch’s portfolio of legacy launch partners,” SpaceRyde chief revenue officer Negar Feher said in a statement. “There is a gap for fast and reliable access to custom orbits in space at a competitive price. These four launches are just the beginning.” SpaceRyde, founded in 2018, develops the Rocket Network space transportation infrastructure to continuously transport goods between Earth, the Moon and intermediate destinations. It will be a cool launch tech if it comes together. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

RFA to test engines closer to you. Rocket Factory Augsburg has entered into an agreement with the German Aerospace Center (DLR) to test its Helix engines at the Institute for Space Propulsion in Lampoldshausen, Payload reports. RFA currently performs all of its engine testing at the Esrange space center in Sweden. However, Lampoldshausen is significantly closer to the company’s manufacturing plant in Augsburg.

Access to the establishment in a year? … RFA will use both Esrange and Lampoldshausen to increase its capacity. All testing of the integrated scene will still be carried out at Esrange. Before construction of the new testbed can begin, DLR must first complete construction of the supporting infrastructure. DLR plans to complete this by mid-2023, while RFA is aiming for the second half of the year to cut the ribbon on its new test bed. This all seems slightly theoretical, as Payload notes that RFA is currently not fully funded until the first flight of its RFA ONE rocket. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

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Mysterious spaceplane stays in orbit for 908 days before returning to Earth https://stlouisrocketry.org/mysterious-spaceplane-stays-in-orbit-for-908-days-before-returning-to-earth/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 15:41:29 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/mysterious-spaceplane-stays-in-orbit-for-908-days-before-returning-to-earth/ The X-37B orbital test vehicle sits on the runway during post-landing operations in 2010 (US Air Force Photo/Michael Stonecypher) (Photo by DoD/Corbis via Getty Images) A mysterious robotic “space plane” – more than two years – before finally landing last Saturday. The Boeing X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV) landed at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in […]]]>

The X-37B orbital test vehicle sits on the runway during post-landing operations in 2010 (US Air Force Photo/Michael Stonecypher) (Photo by DoD/Corbis via Getty Images)

A mysterious robotic “space plane” – more than two years – before finally landing last Saturday.

The Boeing X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV) landed at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The new flight exceeded that of the machine .

The X37-b first went into space in 2010 and flew six missions.

The craft can carry cargo into space and send it back to engineers on Earth.

When he landed from a previous mission, he was greeted by ground crew in biohazard gear – sparking rumors that there was something radioactive on board.

Read more:

The plane has a wingspan of less than 15ft – and is taken into space on a rocket, but returns to Earth like a space shuttle.

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV-6) launches from Pad 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station May 17, 2020 in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  The USSF-7 mission for the US Space Force is the sixth flight of the OTV-6 spaceplane, an unmanned spacecraft that looks like a miniature version of NASA's retired space shuttle.  (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the X-37B orbital test vehicle will launch in 2020 (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

With the successful completion of its sixth mission, the reusable spaceplane has now flown more than 1.3 billion miles and spent a total of ten years in space.

Boeing says it is conducting experiments for government and industrial partners with the possibility of sending them back to Earth for evaluation.

“This mission highlights Space Force‘s focus on collaborative space exploration and expanding low-cost access to space for our partners, in and out. of the Department of the Air Force (DAF),” said General Chance Saltzman, Chief of Space Operations.

The sixth mission launched atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in May 2020.

Read more:

Hosted experiments included a solar power experiment designed by the Naval Research Lab, as well as a satellite designed and built by U.S. Air Force Academy cadets in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory.

The satellite, dubbed FalconSat-8, was successfully deployed in October 2021 and remains in orbit today.

This mission also hosted several NASA experiments, including Materials Exposure and Technological Innovation in Space (METIS-2), which evaluated the effects of space exposure on various materials to validate and improve the accuracy of spatial environment models. This was the second flight for this type of experience. Mission 6 also hosted a NASA experiment to assess the effects of long-term space exposure on seeds.

Jim Chilton, senior vice president, Boeing Space and Launch, said, “Since the first launch of the X-37B in 2010, it has broken records and provided our nation with an unparalleled capability to rapidly test and integrate new space technologies. .

“With the added service module, this was the most we have ever carried into orbit on the X-37B and we are proud to have been able to prove this flexible new capability to the government and its industrial partners.”

Watch: US Space Force releases recruiting video

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Polish-built Ukrainian warship engaging the Russians https://stlouisrocketry.org/polish-built-ukrainian-warship-engaging-the-russians/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 08:12:03 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/polish-built-ukrainian-warship-engaging-the-russians/ Ukrainian landing craft, with its former tactical designation U401, during an exercise involving the use of the WM-18A launcher, in 2013. Photo. Ukrainian Ministry of Defense Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Copy link Send an email The story turns in circles. Recently, an interesting video clip was released. If real, it shows a Ukrainian landing ship built […]]]>

Ukrainian landing craft, with its former tactical designation U401, during an exercise involving the use of the WM-18A launcher, in 2013.

Photo. Ukrainian Ministry of Defense