Rocket ship – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 17:51:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png Rocket ship – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 New Urwerk wristwatch inspired by NASA’s Space Shuttle Enterprise commands https://stlouisrocketry.org/new-urwerk-wristwatch-inspired-by-nasas-space-shuttle-enterprise-commands/ https://stlouisrocketry.org/new-urwerk-wristwatch-inspired-by-nasas-space-shuttle-enterprise-commands/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 15:20:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/new-urwerk-wristwatch-inspired-by-nasas-space-shuttle-enterprise-commands/ The analog dials and displays used to pilot a 40-year-old NASA space shuttle inspired the look of a new avant-garde timepiece. The UR-100V P.02 wristwatch, which was unveiled on Tuesday, July 20, merges Swiss luxury watchmaker Urwerk’s unique approach to displaying the time with the aesthetic of the cockpit of the space shuttle Enterprise. The […]]]>

The analog dials and displays used to pilot a 40-year-old NASA space shuttle inspired the look of a new avant-garde timepiece.

The UR-100V P.02 wristwatch, which was unveiled on Tuesday, July 20, merges Swiss luxury watchmaker Urwerk’s unique approach to displaying the time with the aesthetic of the cockpit of the space shuttle Enterprise. The watch is the result of a partnership between Urwerk and Collective Horology, a club of watch enthusiasts based in Silicon Valley, with the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York, which features the Retired Enterprise. .


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New SpaceX drone spacecraft arrives in Port Canaveral – Spaceflight Now https://stlouisrocketry.org/new-spacex-drone-spacecraft-arrives-in-port-canaveral-spaceflight-now/ https://stlouisrocketry.org/new-spacex-drone-spacecraft-arrives-in-port-canaveral-spaceflight-now/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 23:43:52 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/new-spacex-drone-spacecraft-arrives-in-port-canaveral-spaceflight-now/ se A new SpaceX drone spacecraft named “A Shortfall of Gravitas” was towed to Port Canaveral on Thursday, completing a redesign of SpaceX’s rocket landing platforms to support upcoming launches from Florida and California. “A Shortfall of Gravitas” was towed from a construction facility in Louisiana after completing an initial round of sea trials. SpaceX […]]]>

A new SpaceX drone spacecraft named “A Shortfall of Gravitas” was towed to Port Canaveral on Thursday, completing a redesign of SpaceX’s rocket landing platforms to support upcoming launches from Florida and California.

“A Shortfall of Gravitas” was towed from a construction facility in Louisiana after completing an initial round of sea trials. SpaceX crews at Port Canaveral will finish preparing the drone for landings off the Falcon rocket boosters .

The name of the new landing pad is a nod to ‘Experiencing Significant Lack of Gravity’, a spacecraft featured in the late Scottish author Iain’s ‘Culture’ sci-fi novel series. Mr. Banks.

SpaceX’s other two drones are also named as sentient planet-sized ships in Banks’ novels: “Just Read the Instructions” and “Of course, I still love you.”

Drones allow SpaceX to salvage and reuse Falcon 9 boosters, reducing costs and increasing the company’s launch rate.

With three drone ships now in its fleet, SpaceX is configured for a steady rate of flights from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California, following a lull in Falcon 9 launch activity at the launch site. from the west coast.

SpaceX has launched only one Falcon 9 rocket mission from Vandenberg in the past two years. During this mission, the Falcon 9 booster returned to a landing on a platform near the launch site at Vandenberg.

Starting in the last week of July, SpaceX plans to launch a series of Falcon 9 missions from Vandenberg carrying Starlink Internet satellites into orbit. The Falcon 9 boosters used on these launches will land offshore due to the heavy weight of the Starlink payloads, leaving insufficient propellant on the rocket to reverse course and return to the launch site.

SpaceX recently moved the “Of course, I still love you” drone from Florida to the Port of Los Angeles in preparation for upcoming Starlink missions. The company is expected to launch Starlink missions from Vandenberg once a month, kicking off the next phase of the global internet network rollout.

The ship passed through the Panama Canal on a barge before arriving in Southern California on July 6.

SpaceX’s new drone, named “A Shortfall of Gravitas,” arrived in Port Canaveral on Thursday. Credit: Stephen Clark / Spaceflight Now

SpaceX will use the new rotating drone ship with “Just Read the Instructions” to support the Cape Canaveral missions. The company previously used a similar rotation of the other two drones at Port Canaveral, supporting 20 Falcon 9 launches and landing attempts during the first half of this year.

It can take up to a week to deploy the drone, retrieve the rocket, and bring it back to port, and there is no delay in the launch. Turnaround times can be even longer once the booster is unloaded in port and the ship is ready for another sea voyage. The presence of two drone ships in Florida will allow SpaceX to continue its busy launch schedule. .

Later this year, SpaceX will deploy the two ships from Florida for a double sea landing of the two side boosters during the upcoming Falcon Heavy rocket launch for the US Space Force. SpaceX will dedicate the Falcon Heavy’s central stage to this launch due to the mission requirements of placing military payloads into a high-altitude geosynchronous orbit, according to a Space Force spokesperson.

Each drone is adorned with a bull’s eye with a stylized “X” logo. The landing platform is about the size of a football field, and the ships are based on the hulls of Marmac barges originally built for other purposes.

Elon Musk, founder and CEO of SpaceX, announced that the company is building a third drone in 2018.

“The team did a great job! It will be epic to see offshore oil rigs converted to ocean space ports for Starship, ”Musk tweeted Thursday, referring to SpaceX’s work to outfit giant oil rigs for heavy launcher launches and landings. next generation of the company.

The new drone ship has a sleeker look than SpaceX’s first two rocket landing craft. It has a Starlink antenna to connect to SpaceX’s space broadband network, and the supporting equipment is housed inside the ship’s structure for better protection against rocket blast during landing.

Underwater thrusters allow the ship to maintain its position in the ocean while awaiting each rocket landing. A support team is stationed on a nearby ship.

Improvements were also made to the lighting on “A Shortfall of Gravitas,” and Musk tweeted that the new ship is designed to be fully self-contained, unlike the other two ships, which require a tug to get to the area. landing and coming back.

SpaceX’s “Of Course I Still Love You” drone arrives at the Port of Los Angeles on July 6 to support future Falcon 9 missions from Space Force Base Vandenberg. Credit: Gene Blevins / LA Daily News

SpaceX has successfully recovered Falcon rocket thrusters 89 times since the company’s first rocket landing in December 2015. The first successful thruster landing on a drone occurred in April 2016.

Sixty-six of SpaceX’s Falcon booster landings to date have taken place on a drone, with another 20 successful landings on SpaceX’s two land landing zones at the Cape Canaveral space station. Three Falcon boosters returned to the landing at Vandenberg Space Force Base.

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Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @ StephenClark1.



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The Amazon effect https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-amazon-effect/ https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-amazon-effect/#respond Fri, 09 Jul 2021 17:44:16 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-amazon-effect/ July 2021 is a big month for Amazon founder and former CEO Jeff Bezos. Not only did he resign as CEO of the company in which he built a $ 1.63 trillion empire, it will also fly into space during the first crewed flight of its New Shepard rocket. And yet, space travel is just […]]]>

July 2021 is a big month for Amazon founder and former CEO Jeff Bezos. Not only did he resign as CEO of the company in which he built a $ 1.63 trillion empire, it will also fly into space during the first crewed flight of its New Shepard rocket. And yet, space travel is just the most recent of Bezos’ groundbreaking efforts. Bezos and his company have revolutionized American businesses, expanding their reach to almost everything from retail to media, healthcare and cloud computing.

Brad Stone– the author, more recently, of Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the invention of a global empire– explains that the e-commerce giant has often seemed “loosed from the laws of business gravity”. As most companies eventually stabilize, Stone says Amazon has defied those business standards by continuing to grow rapidly. Stone, a senior editor at Bloomberg News with years of experience reporting on the company, examines Amazon’s various successes and Bezos’ considerable influence. Specifically, it traces Bezos’ transformation from a frugal tech nerd to a buff billionaire whose high-profile divorce made headlines. But what exactly explains Amazon’s extraordinary rise? If there’s one thing that drives Bezos, Stone points out, it’s his deep fear of stasis.

Three takeaway dishes:

  • Despite being the least customer-oriented sector of the business, Amazon’s web services are the most profitable, bringing over $ 13.5 billion per year. The subsidiary even allows them to take advantage of their competitors: Netflix, Disney and Apple all use Amazon Web Services for the backend of their operations. As Stone notes, the cloud computing service allows the company to benefit “at every level of the ecosystem.”
  • In 2013, Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post for $ 250 million. After just three years under Bezos, the once struggling newspaper become profitable. “He completely reversed that atmosphere of melancholy decline,” says Stone. Stone also assumes that Bezos’ decision to buy the To post was probably fueled by a desire to expand its presence in Washington. But his ownership of the newspaper put him at odds with President Trump, who disliked his administration’s newspaper coverage, later dubbing him “Jeff Bozo.” Hostility peaked with Trump reportedly withdrew the $ 10 billion JEDI IT contract from Amazon in retaliation.
  • Amazon has long been accused of violating antitrust laws, and Stone points out that the company “has taken a considerable image hit” over the past year. During the pandemic in particular, “we started to see it more as a monopoly that deserved regulatory and legislative attention,” he says. And indeed, in May, the District of Columbia Attorney General Amazon sued for overwhelming unfair competition. While Amazon may be forced to change some of its practices, Stone speculates that policymakers will find it difficult to significantly change its trends. He explains that “there is a market definition challenge,” according to which regulators have so far not clarified exactly which online marketplace Amazon dominates.

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“Get to the moon on the first try:” what we heard this week https://stlouisrocketry.org/get-to-the-moon-on-the-first-try-what-we-heard-this-week/ https://stlouisrocketry.org/get-to-the-moon-on-the-first-try-what-we-heard-this-week/#respond Sun, 04 Jul 2021 22:00:52 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/get-to-the-moon-on-the-first-try-what-we-heard-this-week/ “It’s like launching a rocket in the hope of going into orbit, but reaching the moon on the first try.” – Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, describing an intravenous infusion of CRISPR that reduced levels of a pathogenic protein in vivo for the first time in humans. “Imagine a fully loaded jumbo jet […]]]>

“It’s like launching a rocket in the hope of going into orbit, but reaching the moon on the first try.” – Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, describing an intravenous infusion of CRISPR that reduced levels of a pathogenic protein in vivo for the first time in humans.

“Imagine a fully loaded jumbo jet with 220 passengers and crew crashing down today, and the same thing has happened tomorrow and every day of next week and every day of next month”, – David Williams, PhD, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, on the degree to which structural racism has contributed to poorer health outcomes for black Americans.

“When you look at all the applicants, the same number matches as 10 years ago. They just have to apply to twice as many programs and spend twice as much money to do so.” – Bryan Carmody, MD, of Eastern Virginia Medical School, on the crowded landscape of residency applications.

“One of the key elements is allowing people to have the opportunity to get their questions and concerns answered.” – Jennifer Dillaha, MD, Arkansas Department of Health, discussing “reluctance” from the COVID-19 vaccine.

“Overall, this is stressful on our system. We are not done with the pandemic yet. We have severe staff shortages across the country and around Portland.” – Bory Kea, MD, of Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, on the heat wave in the Pacific Northwest.

“The findings could open the door to new approaches to manage pain in humans, but we still know very little.” – Christopher Ramsden, MD, National Institute on Aging, about a study showing that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids reduced the frequency and severity of headaches in migraine patients.

“There are still breakthrough infections after vaccination – and more with Delta – but current vaccines still offer excellent protection against disease and death compared to no vaccination.” – Christina Pagel, PhD, University College London, on the Delta COVID-19 variant.

“It’s the region that really matters here.” – Archie Bleyer, MD, of Oregon Health & Science University, discussing a survey in Mountain West states showing that more than a third of young cancer survivors are reluctant to be vaccinated against COVID-19.


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