falcon rocket – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 14:00:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png falcon rocket – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 SpaceX will launch 48 Starlink satellites, an Earth rocket today and you can watch it live https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-will-launch-48-starlink-satellites-an-earth-rocket-today-and-you-can-watch-it-live/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 11:49:23 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-will-launch-48-starlink-satellites-an-earth-rocket-today-and-you-can-watch-it-live/ SpaceX will launch four dozen Starlink internet satellites and land the return rocket Wednesday, March 9, and you can watch the action live. One step in two steps Falcon 9 The rocket topped with 48 Starlink spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Wednesday at 8:45 a.m. […]]]>

SpaceX will launch four dozen Starlink internet satellites and land the return rocket Wednesday, March 9, and you can watch the action live.

One step in two steps Falcon 9 The rocket topped with 48 Starlink spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Wednesday at 8:45 a.m. EST (1345 GMT). If all goes as planned, approximately nine minutes later the Falcon 9 first stage will descend for a vertical landing on the SpaceX A Shortfall of Gravitas drone, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles off the coast of Florida.

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The weather looks good for SpaceX’s next rocket launch in Florida https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-weather-looks-good-for-spacexs-next-rocket-launch-in-florida/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 17:31:57 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-weather-looks-good-for-spacexs-next-rocket-launch-in-florida/ Space is important to us, which is why we strive to provide you with the best coverage of industry and launches in Florida. Journalism like this takes time and resources. Please support him with a subscription here. — Space Force forecasters predict solidly favorable weather for SpaceX’s next launch on Tuesday, a mission that should […]]]>

Space is important to us, which is why we strive to provide you with the best coverage of industry and launches in Florida. Journalism like this takes time and resources. Please support him with a subscription here.

Space Force forecasters predict solidly favorable weather for SpaceX’s next launch on Tuesday, a mission that should boost another batch of Starlink internet satellites.

Forecasters say conditions at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station are expected to be 80% “one way” for a Falcon 9 rocket launch window that runs from 8:56 a.m. to 10:57 a.m. EST. Some cloud, however, may persist around Launch Complex 40 through Tuesday.

“A collision with a sea breeze from Monday evening through early Tuesday morning will cause downpours to move east over central Florida, and these downpours have the potential to linger into the launch window,” said Space Launch Delta 45 forecasters. said sunday. “The primary weather concern for Tuesday’s launch attempt is the cumulus rule.”

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SpaceX launches 49 Starlink satellites and lands a rocket on Sunday: watch live https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-launches-49-starlink-satellites-and-lands-a-rocket-on-sunday-watch-live/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 12:21:17 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-launches-49-starlink-satellites-and-lands-a-rocket-on-sunday-watch-live/ SpaceX will launch more than four dozen satellites and land the return rocket on Monday (February 21), and you can watch the action live. A two-stage Falcon 9 rocket topped by SpaceX’s 49 Stellar Link The broadband spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Sunday at 9:44 […]]]>

SpaceX will launch more than four dozen satellites and land the return rocket on Monday (February 21), and you can watch the action live.

A two-stage Falcon 9 rocket topped by SpaceX’s 49 Stellar Link The broadband spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Sunday at 9:44 a.m. EST (1444 GMT). You can watch it live here on Space.com, courtesy of SpaceX, or directly through the company. SpaceX’s webcast will begin approximately 15 minutes before launch.

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SpaceX postpones weekend Falcon 9 rocket launch at Kennedy Space Center to Monday – WFTV https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-postpones-weekend-falcon-9-rocket-launch-at-kennedy-space-center-to-monday-wftv/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 18:35:03 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-postpones-weekend-falcon-9-rocket-launch-at-kennedy-space-center-to-monday-wftv/ KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — A rocket launch scheduled for this weekend has been moved to Monday, according to SpaceX. READ: The billionaire who flew SpaceX last year returning to orbit SpaceX announced Saturday afternoon that a Falcon 9 rocket launch scheduled for Sunday has been postponed to Monday. The company said the delay was […]]]>

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — A rocket launch scheduled for this weekend has been moved to Monday, according to SpaceX.

READ: The billionaire who flew SpaceX last year returning to orbit

SpaceX announced Saturday afternoon that a Falcon 9 rocket launch scheduled for Sunday has been postponed to Monday.

The company said the delay was due to weather issues for the recovery of the rocket’s first stage.

Launch is now scheduled for Monday at 9:44 a.m. from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

WATCH: Elon Musk says SpaceX’s Starship spacecraft will launch from Kennedy Space Center

This launch is part of SpaceX’s Starlink mission.

SpaceX said Starlink’s goal is to create a network of satellites that will help deliver internet services to those not yet connected and deliver reliable, affordable internet around the world.

READ: SpaceX satellites fall out of orbit after solar storm

If the Falcon 9 rocket is launched, Eyewitness News will be covered live on Channel 9.

Click here to download the free WFTV news and weather apps, and Click here to watch the latest news on your Smart TV.

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SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches five 3D-printed AlbaPod deployers » https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-falcon-9-rocket-launches-five-3d-printed-albapod-deployers/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 09:07:19 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-falcon-9-rocket-launches-five-3d-printed-albapod-deployers/ Stay up to date with everything happening in the wonderful world of AM through our LinkedIn community. Five AlbaPod v2, the PocketQube deployers of Alba Orbital and additively manufactured by CRP technology were launched into orbit as part of SpaceX’s Transporter-3 mission using the Falcon 9 rocket. The deployers were produced using PBF polymer 3D […]]]>
Stay up to date with everything happening in the wonderful world of AM through our LinkedIn community.

Five AlbaPod v2, the PocketQube deployers of Alba Orbital and additively manufactured by CRP technology were launched into orbit as part of SpaceX’s Transporter-3 mission using the Falcon 9 rocket. The deployers were produced using PBF polymer 3D printing and fiber reinforced composite material. Windform XT 2.0 carbon. The launch took place on Thursday, January 13and2022.

The deployers completed their mission: once separated from the Falcon 9 rocket, the deployers began to launch the PocketQubes into orbit. These, in turn, began to send signals to earth.

One of the AlbaPod v2 PocketQube Deployers by Alba Orbital

With 13 PocketQube spacecraft embedded in five 3D-printed AlbaPods v.2 deployers, the mission represented Alba Orbital’s largest cluster to date and the first PocketQubes deployment of the Falcon-9 Transporter-3. It was the third dedicated launch for SpaceX’s small satellite ride-sharing service, which aims to give microsatellites and CubeSats a more affordable ride into orbit.

The Transporter-3 mission flew southeast of Cape Canaveral, then turned south, parallel to the east coast of Florida, to deliver the 105-passenger Falcon 9 rocket satellite to a polar sun-synchronous orbit. about 326 miles high (525 kilometers).

Engineer Franco Cevolini, CEO and CTO of CRP Technology, said: Congratulations to Alba Orbital and all the teams that have flown with them, for all their hard work. On Thursday, January 13, 2022, a new milestone was reached in the field of nanosatellites: we are very proud, as a supplier of space-proven materials and technologies. This successful mission once again demonstrates the extreme value of Windform materials for high performance, rugged and critical applications.

SpaceX’s Transporter-3 mission, using the Falcon 9 rocket and the associated Alba Orbital mission “Alba Cluster 3 & 4”, consisted of the integration of the 13 PocketQubes into 5 of the 3D printed deployers in preparation for launch. It goes far beyond a one-time prototype process, into a real work production sector for CRP Technology and its US-based partner. United States CRP.

Four of the 13 PocketQubes who took part in the mission scored a “first”:

  • “UNICORN-2A, 2D and 2E are Alba Orbital’s first Earth observation satellites designed to provide Earth’s highest resolution dataset at night.
  • “PION-BR1 is the very first satellite developed by a Brazilian start-up.
  • “GRIZU-263a is the very first Turkish pico-satellite to be launched into orbit, it was designed and built by Turkish student team Grizu-263 Uzay Takımı.
  • TARTAN-ARTIBEUS-1 is the first intermittent orbital computing nanosatellite that operates without a battery aboard the SpaceX Falcon-9 Transporter-3 mission. This open source project was developed at Carnegie Mellon University

Other PocketQubes integrated into Alba’s 3D printed deployers were:

  • MDQube-SAT1, an Argentinian 2p PocketQube developed by Innova Space, a “classroom transformed into a space startup”, carrying out an IoT mission.
  • UNICORN-1, another PocketQube 2p built by Alba, designed in partnership with the European Space Agency – ESA.
  • HADES’ & ‘EASAT, two PocketQubes 1.5p developed in Spain by AMSAT-EA and Hydra Space. They were designed for satellite communications between radio amateurs via a 145/435 MHz transponder.
  • SATTLA-2A & 2B, open-source project developed by Ariel University in Israel. These PocketQubes 2p will use WiFi cards for an extremely long range link applicable to transmit video over 600 km under LOS conditions.
  • DELFI-PQ, a PocketQube 3p developed in the Netherlands by TU Delft | Aerospace Engineering. This satellite is a technology demonstration mission testing a LOFAR payload and a laser retroreflector.

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Having fun: Greenfield man experiences rocket launch for podcast – The Daily Reporter https://stlouisrocketry.org/having-fun-greenfield-man-experiences-rocket-launch-for-podcast-the-daily-reporter/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/having-fun-greenfield-man-experiences-rocket-launch-for-podcast-the-daily-reporter/ Chuck Fields took this photo of a January 13 rocket launch in Florida. Photo submitted Editor’s note: The Daily Reporter will feature our “neighbours” every month, whether it’s someone with an interesting hobby or profession, or a non-profit group that does a difference in our community. Here, Greenfield resident Chuck Fields shares his podcast and […]]]>

Chuck Fields took this photo of a January 13 rocket launch in Florida.

Photo submitted

Editor’s note: The Daily Reporter will feature our “neighbours” every month, whether it’s someone with an interesting hobby or profession, or a non-profit group that does a difference in our community. Here, Greenfield resident Chuck Fields shares his podcast and the opportunity to witness a rocket launch at Kennedy Space Center on Jan. 13 that put 105 small satellites into orbit. Fields, a Cincinnati native, has lived in Greenfield for 10 years. If you know a person or group you would like to see featured in Neighbours, email [email protected]

Daily Reporter: Tell us about your podcast.

Chuck Fields: I created my “Your Space Journey” podcast a few years ago. It’s actually a spinoff of my “Online Coffee Break” podcast that I started in 2018. I had such a tremendous response to my space episodes that I created “Your Space Journey” to focus about the incredible current events in space exploration and the incredible people leading us. I’ve had the chance to cover multiple launches, some up close and some from afar, including interviews with current astronauts from SpaceX’s latest crewed missions. The podcast is available on all popular podcast apps; more information is available at YourSpaceJourney.com.

DR: How did you become interested in space exploration?

CF: My interest in astronomy and space exploration started at the age of 12 when I received my first telescope for Christmas (in 1979). It was actually quite a difficult time for my family. We lost my sister Traci (16) to leukemia on Christmas Eve. I turned to astronomy and space exploration to help me grieve, but I also developed a great passion for it, which I still have to this day.

DR: Why were you invited to attend the launch of SpaceX Transporter 3 on January 13?

CF: I applied to attend several weeks ago, using my podcast credentials. It certainly doesn’t guarantee an invite, but in this case, two days before launch, I found out that my invite had been accepted. I happened to be in Florida at the time, so I took a two-hour jaunt to Kennedy Space Center (and luckily was able to take the day off to attend!).

DR: How was the experience?

CF: I had the wonderful pleasure of watching this incredible launch from the US Space Force station about three miles from where SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket was. This Transporter 3 mission carried 105 satellites and was the first launch from Cape Canaveral that landed the Booster ashore, in Landing Zone 1 just one mile from the launch pad.

It was the third time I had the chance to witness a make-up landing. Watching a rocket take off is almost indescribable, feeling the incredible sound rumble through your bones as you watch the rocket soar higher and higher. But then to see the booster come apart and watch it “fall in style,” as Buzz Lightyear would say, is just amazing. As if that weren’t enough, we were treated to a sonic boom as the booster approached the landing pad, slowing enough to break the sound barrier.

This booster – B1058, flew for the tenth time, the third such booster from SpaceX to do so. This was the second time I saw this booster fly. I last saw it for the Starlink L20 mission in March 2021. Historically, this booster is famous for first flying on SpaceX Demo2, the company’s first crewed mission, with Bob and Doug.

DR: What do you do with the photos and the experience?

I like to share the experience with others and, of course, I like to take good photos. It’s not easy to do! I had the chance to cover the launch of SpaceX Inspiration 4, the first all-civilian space mission last September. I had two remote cameras on the launchpad and neither got a decent photo. I’m also a part-time coding teacher, and for Inspiration 4 I was able to livestream the Kennedy Space Center launch to my class.

DR: What’s next for you and your podcast?

I’m lining up some new guests and subjects for Season 3 of “Your Space Journey,” and hope to be looking forward to covering a few more launches this year. I would really love to help spread the excitement with others and hopefully help encourage children and adults to believe that we have a bright future ahead of us. We just need to allow ourselves to dream, think positive, and enjoy the ride, even if it’s through a camera.

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Cruise ship enters launch danger zone, forcing SpaceX to scrub again https://stlouisrocketry.org/cruise-ship-enters-launch-danger-zone-forcing-spacex-to-scrub-again/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 13:57:58 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/cruise-ship-enters-launch-danger-zone-forcing-spacex-to-scrub-again/ Space is important to us and that’s why we strive to provide you with the best coverage of the industry and Florida launches. Journalism like this takes time and resources. Please support him with a subscription here. — A cruise ship veered into the exclusion zone along the flight path of a Falcon 9 rocket […]]]>

Space is important to us and that’s why we strive to provide you with the best coverage of the industry and Florida launches. Journalism like this takes time and resources. Please support him with a subscription here.

A cruise ship veered into the exclusion zone along the flight path of a Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday night, forcing SpaceX to once again withdraw from the mission and prepare for a 24-hour turnaround .

Launch engineers, counting to a 6:11 p.m. EST liftoff from Space Force Station Cape Canaveral, waited as long as possible for the Coast Guard to resolve the situation, but ultimately ran out of time to meet the instant window deadline. It was the fourth delay for the mission which was previously canceled due to bad weather around Launch Complex 40.

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SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launch aborted over cruise ship in hazardous area – WFTV https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-falcon-9-rocket-launch-aborted-over-cruise-ship-in-hazardous-area-wftv/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 23:22:26 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-falcon-9-rocket-launch-aborted-over-cruise-ship-in-hazardous-area-wftv/ KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — SpaceX called off its fourth attempt to launch a Falcon 9 rocket after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area at Cape Canaveral. 6:20 p.m. update: SpaceX paused its countdown at 33 seconds after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area that must be cleared for safety reasons. The Falcon […]]]>

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — SpaceX called off its fourth attempt to launch a Falcon 9 rocket after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area at Cape Canaveral.

6:20 p.m. update:

SpaceX paused its countdown at 33 seconds after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area that must be cleared for safety reasons.

The Falcon 9 rocket is attempting to land at Kennedy Space Center and the areas around the launch and landing sight must be cleared for approval.

SpaceX will now go for a fifth launch attempt Monday at 6:11 p.m.

WATCH THE FULL SPACEX WEBSTREAM HERE:

Original report:

After several failed attempts due to weather issues, SpaceX is set to launch its Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday.

This will be SpaceX’s fourth attempt to launch an Italian satellite from Florida’s Space Coast.

READ: Weather delays SpaceX rocket launch from Florida space coast until Sunday

The company has been trying to send its Falcon 9 rocket since Thursday but kept pushing it back due to weather.

The launch is scheduled for 6:11 p.m. and the weather is 90% favorable for take-off.

WATCH: New report examines NASA’s future and mission safety

If the mission goes as planned, SpaceX aims to launch a second Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center.

SpaceX plans to launch another batch of Starlink satellites on Monday afternoon.

READ: NASA adds 3 more SpaceX crewed flights to the International Space Station

The company creates a constellation of satellites to provide high-speed Internet access around the world.

When these two launches take place, Channel 9 will broadcast them live and provide updates on Eyewitness News.

Click here to download the free WFTV news and weather apps, and Click here to watch the latest news on your Smart TV.

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SpaceX will launch the Falcon 9 rocket https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-will-launch-the-falcon-9-rocket/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-will-launch-the-falcon-9-rocket/ At 3:11 p.m. today, SpaceX is expected to launch the Falcon 9 rocket and Earth observation satellite from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. The launch was previously scheduled to take place at the same time on Saturday, but was postponed to just before 10:30 a.m. due to weather. “Three previous attempts were canceled […]]]>

At 3:11 p.m. today, SpaceX is expected to launch the Falcon 9 rocket and Earth observation satellite from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

The launch was previously scheduled to take place at the same time on Saturday, but was postponed to just before 10:30 a.m. due to weather.

“Three previous attempts were canceled due to bad weather,” according to a Yahoo report.

The second-generation COSMO-SkyMed FM2, or CSG-2, is expected to fly from Launch Complex 40. The booster is expected to return to Cape Canaveral. Spectators and residents of the launch are warned to be prepared for the sonic boom.

“According to the latest forecast from the US Space Force’s Delta 45 group in Florida, there is less than a 10% chance that bad weather will affect SpaceX’s CSG-2 satellite launch plans on Sunday,” Tariq Malik reported. , editor-in-chief. Head of Space.com.

“The delays have had a ripple effect on SpaceX missions. The Hawthorne, Calif.-based company is also preparing to launch its next batch of Starlink internet satellites from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, which sits near Cape Town Space Force Station. Canaveral. This mission was originally scheduled to launch on Saturday afternoon, but was delayed to Sunday at the earliest due to the CSG-2 launch delay on Friday,” space.com reported.

In addition, the Starlink mission will launch no earlier than Monday, according to SpaceX officials, Malik reported. SpaceX is also preparing to launch a third rocket that will carry an NROL-87 rated satellite for the US National Reconnaissance Office. The launch is expected to take place on February 2. The mission will take off from SpaceX’s pad at Vandenberg Space Force Base northwest of Lompoc.

The weather forecast for missions in Florida appears to have improved today.

The launch is scheduled for 3:11 p.m., which you can watch live at www.spacex.com. A livestream will begin at 2:56 p.m.

Email: kzehnder@newspress.com

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How the holy grail of spaceflight could soon become reality https://stlouisrocketry.org/how-the-holy-grail-of-spaceflight-could-soon-become-reality/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 20:00:25 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/how-the-holy-grail-of-spaceflight-could-soon-become-reality/ Long-time spaceflight the dream could soon come back in full force. This month, Washington-based Radian Aerospace announced it was building a single-stage orbiting spaceplane that takes off and lands horizontally. The revelation sparked excitement for what could be considered the holy grail of the decades-old industry. Christie Maddock, a lecturer in mechanical and aerospace engineering […]]]>

Long-time spaceflight the dream could soon come back in full force.

This month, Washington-based Radian Aerospace announced it was building a single-stage orbiting spaceplane that takes off and lands horizontally. The revelation sparked excitement for what could be considered the holy grail of the decades-old industry.

Christie Maddock, a lecturer in mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of Strathclyde, says the “seductive concept” has been around for almost a century.

“Radian Aerospace’s announcement is exciting, primarily in that it signifies that work in this area, towards this goal, is underway,” Maddock said. Reverse. “What exactly this work is, and how successful it can be, is impossible to say without knowing the technical details.”

If Radian can pull it off, it could mean rockets that work more like planes. That means better reuse, faster reuse, and in Radian’s case, the ability to land on a wide variety of tracks.

Want to know more about what’s going on in the world of space? To subscribe to THE MUSK LIT+ for exclusive interviews and analysis on spaceflight, electric cars, and more.

Here’s what you need to know about the technology:

Single-stage in orbit: why do we have stages?

First, a quick introduction. Space rockets do not fire their engines and head straight to their destination like a car: they are actually made up of several mini-rockets that fall off after use.

everyday astronaut note that the German Rocket V2 was the first to go into space, when in 1944 he reached an altitude of 109 miles. This placed it beyond the 62-mile Kármán line, generally accepted as the limit of space.

A replica of a V2 rocket.photo alliance/photo alliance/Getty Images

It’s fine for a short demonstration, but the rockets have to go faster to reach orbit. The goal is to break away from Earth’s gravity. The speed at which an object can escape Earth’s gravitational forces is its escape velocity, and for Earth it is approximately 25,000mph.

The problem with reaching this speed is that the rockets are heavy. More fuel gives more power, but it makes the rocket heavier. You find yourself in a game of cat and mouse trying to add enough fuel to power your increasingly heavy rocket.

That of the Soviet Union R-7 rocket family, which sent the first satellite into space, circumvented this problem by discarding engines and fuel tanks after the fuel ran out. The rocket would then use another smaller set of engines and fuel tanks to continue climbing.

“Same thrust, lighter mass, means higher acceleration,” says Maddock.

This process of losing weight, known as “staging,” fuels the space industry as it stands today. NASA’s Saturn V, which sent the first humans to the Moon, used three stages. SpaceX’s Falcon 9 uses two stages.

Saturn V from NASA.Congressional Quarterly/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

What is single-stage orbiting?

The problem with staging is that you dump components at launch time. This makes it more difficult to reuse a rocket.

SpaceX has focused on making the first stage of its fully reusable Falcon 9 rocket, but the second stage is still expendable. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has pointed to airplanes as an ideal for why spaceflight companies should reuse rockets — it would be unreasonable to crash the plane or lose components on every flight.

“It’s really crazy that we build these fancy rockets and smash them every time they fly,” Musk said in 2017. SpaceX is currently developing a fully reusable spacecraft, where the booster and the craft land every two safely.

Airplanes, in a sense, are the ultimate example of why a single stage in orbit would be ideal – more durable, cheaper, less manufacturing involved.

Radian wants to use a concept known as a rocket sled launch, which starts horizontally, descending a track to gain speed before pulling up a ramp at the end, starting the rocket at an angle as it lifts off in opposition to a vertical launch that gradually rounds its trajectory to reach orbit.

How to make a single-stage rocket into orbit?

Maddock explains that there are a few techniques that researchers have explored:

  • Lifting surfaces as wings could help generate lift and reduce the need for more propellant – assuming the mass of the wings is less than the mass of the propellant
  • Use of air from the atmosphere as part of the propulsion system, replacing the oxidizer used in a propulsion system. Unfortunately, it would still have to revert to a more traditional rocket engine as the vehicle moved through the thinner atmosphere at higher altitudes.
  • The use of lighter materials make the mass smaller

What does Radian Aerospace promise?

We know little so far, but Radian is making big promises with the Radian One vehicle:

  • A rocket that take off horizontally with sleigh assistance
  • A comfortable ascent with lesser forces against the crew
  • Soft landings on any 10,000 foot runway
  • The ability to land and fly again in just 48 hours

Radian plans to use it to send crew and light cargo to low Earth orbit. It claims to have already entered into launch service agreements with “commercial space stations, in-space manufacturers, satellite and cargo companies”, as well as US and foreign governments.

In its latest reveal, Radian announced that it has closed $27.5 million in seed funding. Its advisory team includes Michael López-Alegría, who will fly as one of the first crew members on Axiom Space’s Ax-1 mission in late March.

Who else has tried to do a single-stage orbit?

Radian isn’t the first to consider a luge. Maddock notes that in 1933 Eugen Sänger unveiled the plans for the Silbervogel. This would have used a Radian-type rocket sled to accelerate the vehicle to 1,200 mph using a series of V2 rockets.

Jalopnik reports that the idea was dropped by the German government, but the US Air Force has explored a similar idea. Boeing’s X-20 Dyna-Soar replaced the V2s with Titan IIIs, but that too was discontinued in the 1960s. The concepts eventually helped build NASA’s multi-stage space shuttle.

In the 1986 State of the Union Address, President Ronald Reagan expressed his support for a new single-stage project in orbit:

“We are continuing our research into a new Orient Express that could, by the end of the next decade, take off from Dulles Airport, accelerate up to 25 times the speed of sound, reach low Earth orbit or fly to Tokyo in two hours.”

The National Aero-Space Plane, a NASA project, promised to reach orbit from virtually any airport. the New York Times reports that it promised to reach speeds of up to 17,000 mph and circle the globe in 90 minutes.

Unfortunately, the technical obstacles proved to be too many. In 1994, after spending $1.6 billion, the project was canceled.

Also in the 1980s, Rolls-Royce and British Aerospace explored the HOTEL space vehicle. This vehicle, with the acronym HOrizontal TakeOff and Landing, promised to travel from the United Kingdom to Australia in about an hour. It would have carried 15,400 pounds into low Earth orbit.

Whether Radian can succeed where others have failed remains to be seen.

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