international space – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 18:19:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png international space – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 3 Russian cosmonauts arrive at the International Space Station https://stlouisrocketry.org/3-russian-cosmonauts-arrive-at-the-international-space-station/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 18:19:06 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/3-russian-cosmonauts-arrive-at-the-international-space-station/ MOSCOW (AP) — A trio of Russian cosmonauts arrived at the International Space Station on Friday, the first new faces in space since Russia’s war in Ukraine began. Russian space company Roscosmos cosmonauts Oleg Artemyev, Denis Matveyev and Sergey Korsakov successfully lifted off from Russia’s leased launch facility in Baikonur, Kazakhstan in their Soyuz MS-21 […]]]>

MOSCOW (AP) — A trio of Russian cosmonauts arrived at the International Space Station on Friday, the first new faces in space since Russia’s war in Ukraine began.

Russian space company Roscosmos cosmonauts Oleg Artemyev, Denis Matveyev and Sergey Korsakov successfully lifted off from Russia’s leased launch facility in Baikonur, Kazakhstan in their Soyuz MS-21 spacecraft at 8:55 p.m. Friday (11:55 a.m. EDT). They docked smoothly at the station just over three hours later, joining two Russians, four Americans and a German on the orbiting outpost.

The liftoff marked the first launch by a space crew since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24.

The war led to canceled spacecraft launches and broken contracts. Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin has warned the United States should use “broomsticks” to fly in space after Russia said it would stop supplying rocket engines to American companies. However, many fear that Rogozin could jeopardize decades of peaceful off-planet partnership, including on the International Space Station.

NASA Administrator Bill Nelson played down Rogozin’s comments, telling The Associated Press, “It’s just Dmitry Rogozin. It springs from time to time. But in the end, he worked with us,”

“Other people who work in the Russian civilian space program are professionals,” Nelson told the AP on Friday. “They don’t miss a beat with us American astronauts and American mission control. Despite all this, in space we can have cooperation with our Russian friends, our colleagues.”

NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei – who on Tuesday broke the US record for a single 340-day spaceflight – is due to depart the International Space Station with two Russians aboard a Soyuz capsule for a March 30 landing in Kazakhstan.

In April, three more NASA astronauts and an Italian astronaut are scheduled to take off for the space station.

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Pete Davidson and five paying customers will fly on Jeff Bezos’ suborbital rocket https://stlouisrocketry.org/pete-davidson-and-five-paying-customers-will-fly-on-jeff-bezos-suborbital-rocket/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:52:37 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/pete-davidson-and-five-paying-customers-will-fly-on-jeff-bezos-suborbital-rocket/ The company announced Monday morning that Davidson, the Saturday Night Live star who became a mainstay of entertainment intrigue amid his relationship with Kim Kardashian, will fly alongside five paying customers on the 60ft New Shepard rocket. tall from Blue Origin. The launch is scheduled for March 23 at 8:30 a.m. CT, according to Blue […]]]>
The company announced Monday morning that Davidson, the Saturday Night Live star who became a mainstay of entertainment intrigue amid his relationship with Kim Kardashian, will fly alongside five paying customers on the 60ft New Shepard rocket. tall from Blue Origin.
The launch is scheduled for March 23 at 8:30 a.m. CT, according to Blue Origin. The announcement comes after CNN confirmed earlier that Davidson was in talks with the company for a seat aboard its supersonic rocket, which launches vertically from a rural Texas launch pad on Bezos’ ranch.
After years of quiet development, Blue Origin’s space-touring rocket made its crewed debut last year with Bezos, flying alongside space community hero Wally Funk, her brother Mark Bezos and fellow space heroes. a paying customer.
Since then, Blue Origin has made headlines for piloting other well-known names on two subsequent flights, including Star Trek star William Shatner and Good Morning America host Michael Strahan.

Blue Origin’s goal is to make these suborbital spaceflights a mainstay of pop culture, providing a 10-minute supersonic ride to welcomed guests — who until now have been mostly celebrities — and anyone else who has the means.

Davidson will be joined on his flight by five paying customers. Among them, Marty Allen, an investor and the former CEO of a party supply store; Jim Kitchen, entrepreneur and business teacher; George Nield, a former associate director for the Office of Commercial Space Transportation of the Federal Aviation Administration; Marc Hagle, a Orlando real estate developer and his wife, Sharon Hagle, who founded a space-focused nonprofit.

The crew will spend a few days training at Blue Origin’s facility in West Texas before the day of the flight, when they board the New Shepard crew capsule that sits atop the rocket. After liftoff, the rocket will exceed the speed of sound and, near the top of its flight path, will detach from the capsule. As the rocket booster returns to Earth for a vertical landing, the crewed capsule will continue to climb higher into the atmosphere more than 60 miles above the surface where the blackness of space is visible and the Capsule windows will offer unobstructed views of Earth.

As the flight reaches its climax, passengers will experience a few minutes of weightlessness. Bezos notably spent his time in weightlessness bowling and turning around in the cabin. Others have been glued to the window.

As gravity begins to pull the capsule back to the ground, passengers will once again experience intense g-forces before sets of parachutes are deployed to slow the vehicle. It will then land at less than 20 miles per hour in the Texas desert.

Blue Origin's New Shepard takes off from the launch pad with 90-year-old Star Trek actor William Shatner and three other civilians on October 13, 2021 near Van Horn, Texas.

Because the flights are suborbital – meaning they don’t generate enough speed or take the right trajectory to avoid being immediately dragged down by Earth’s gravity – the whole show will only last about 10 minutes.

Blue Origin is the first company to offer scheduled suborbital space tourism flights. Its main competitor, Virgin Galactic, notably made its first crewed flight – which included founder Richard Branson – before Bezos flew last July. But Virgin Galactic has yet to follow up that flight with another crewed flight after it later became clear the company’s spaceplane had deviated from its designated flight path. The company now says it is undergoing independent technology upgrades and could resume flying later this year.

SpaceX is the only private company that offers orbital travel. The company conducted the first-ever all-civilian flight into orbit last September, taking a billionaire and three chosen crewmates on a three-day trip. And later this month, the company plans to take four paying customers on a flight to the International Space Station, which orbits about 200 miles above Earth.

Blue Origin plans to build a rocket powerful enough to reach orbit, called New Glenn. And, in light of the news that Russia can no longer sell rocket engines to the United States, those plans are more urgent than ever. The engines Blue Origin plans to use for New Glenn, the BE-4, will also be used on a future launch vehicle designed by United Launch Alliance, a joint venture between Lockheed Martin and Boeing that is responsible for major national security launches in the States. -United. ULA currently relies on Russian RD-180 engines.

Blue Origin did not have specific updates on BE-4 when contacted for comment.

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European rocket launch company grapples with fallout from war in Ukraine https://stlouisrocketry.org/european-rocket-launch-company-grapples-with-fallout-from-war-in-ukraine/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 13:11:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/european-rocket-launch-company-grapples-with-fallout-from-war-in-ukraine/ French satellite launch company Arianespace said on Friday it was exploring its options after the Russian space agency withdrew cooperation on some projects, disrupting some rocket operations. Arianespace has cooperated with Russian entities to use the Russian-designed Soyuz rocket to launch spacecraft from the European Spaceport in French Guiana and the Russian-controlled Baikonur facility in […]]]>

French satellite launch company Arianespace said on Friday it was exploring its options after the Russian space agency withdrew cooperation on some projects, disrupting some rocket operations.

Arianespace has cooperated with Russian entities to use the Russian-designed Soyuz rocket to launch spacecraft from the European Spaceport in French Guiana and the Russian-controlled Baikonur facility in Kazakhstan.

“Arianespace is in close contact with its customers and the French and European authorities to better assess all the consequences of this situation and to develop alternative solutions,” the company said in a press release.

Roscosmos, as the Russian space agency is known, pulled out due to sanctions the European Union and other governments imposed on Russia following its attack on Ukraine.

The move is a setback for Europe’s efforts to deploy its Galileo constellation of GPS-like satellites. Arianespace was preparing to launch the latest batch of navigation satellites. “The Galileo satellites are in a stable configuration,” the company said.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has emphasized international space cooperation. Roscosmos has raised doubts about its future involvement with the International Space Station and said Thursday it was halting rocket engine deliveries to the United States.

Satellite broadband company OneWeb said on Thursday it would suspend satellite launches from a Russian spaceport in Kazakhstan. The day before, Roscosmos had threatened to block the launch of the company’s communications satellites unless it received guarantees that they would not be used for military purposes.

OneWeb is partly owned by the UK government. Roscosmos suggested the UK should cede the stake, an idea the UK government quickly rejected.

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Ukraine’s little-known space exploits | Science | In-depth science and technology reporting | DW https://stlouisrocketry.org/ukraines-little-known-space-exploits-science-in-depth-science-and-technology-reporting-dw/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 14:09:17 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/ukraines-little-known-space-exploits-science-in-depth-science-and-technology-reporting-dw/ Many space programs and rockets would probably not exist without the Ukrainian space industry. Ukraine has been a major player in the global space industry since the 1950s. Today it is one of the leading designers and manufacturers of space launchers, rocket engines, spacecraft and electronic components . One of the main space manufacturers in […]]]>

Many space programs and rockets would probably not exist without the Ukrainian space industry.

Ukraine has been a major player in the global space industry since the 1950s. Today it is one of the leading designers and manufacturers of space launchers, rocket engines, spacecraft and electronic components .

One of the main space manufacturers in Ukraine is the state-owned company Yuzhmashwho works closely with Yuzhnoye, a satellite and rocket designer based in Ukraine. Both companies were founded in the 1950s and depend on the State Space Agency of Ukraine (SSAU).

A key role on the global space scene

The European Space Agency’s (ESA) successful Vega family of rockets, which recently celebrated its 10th anniversaryhas a Ukrainian manufacturing rocket engine in its upper stage – the part that detaches from the rocket and then places the payload into the desired orbit.

The Vega launcher is used to launch small payloads, and a newer version, the Vega-C, is currently under development and is expected to launch later this year.

Another important rocket family designed by Yuzhnoye is the Zenit, which was intended to replace the obsolete Soviet-era Tsyklon and Soyuz rocket families. After 71 successful launches, the last flight of the Zenit family of rockets took off in December 2017.

The Soyuz family, since its first flight in the 1960s, has been the most widely used launcher in the world. After the Space Shuttle ended in 2011 and until SpaceX’s Falcon 9 mission in 2020, Soyuz rockets were the only launch vehicle approved to send astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS).

An Antares rocket carrying the Cygnus cargo ship to supply the International Space Station

The ISS is in constant need of new supply deliveries. For this, they use different spacecraft such as the SpaceX Dragon, the Russian Progress or the Cygnus, which is carried by an Antares launcher jointly developed by the American company Northrop Grumman and the Ukrainian Yuzhnoye.

Additionally, some parts of the rocket engine technology currently being developed by Rocket Factory Ausburg, a German start-up trying to build the world’s cheapest rocket, comes from Ukraine’s Yuzhmash, according to Golem.

Ukraine’s “Rocket City”

Both Yuzhnoye and Yuzhmash are headquartered in the city of Dnipro in southeastern Ukraine, nicknamed “Rocket City” after its space industry.

A map of Ukraine with some of its largest cities

Dnipro – also known as the “Rocket City” – is located in southeastern Ukraine

So far, no official attack has been reported in the city, but Reuters reported eyewitness video of an alleged explosion near Dnipro February 24.

Two days later, euro news reported that masses of Dnipro men and women were volunteering to join the fight. This was further confirmed by Al Jazeera Witnesseswhich reports that “people are scavenging food, water, clothing and even making Molotov cocktails to throw at tanks”.

During the Soviet era, Dnipro was one of the main centers of space, nuclear and military industries and played a crucial role in the development and manufacture of ballistic missiles for the USSR.

One of the most powerful intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) used during the Cold War was the R-36, which later became the basis for the Tsyklon launcher families. R-36 and Tsyklon were designed by Yuzhnoye and manufactured by Yuzhmash.

A view of an explosion, after Russian President Vladimir Putin authorized a military operation in eastern Ukraine, near Dnipro, Ukraine February 24, 2022

An eyewitness captured what appears to be an explosion near Dnipro on February 24

Dnipro’s famous aerospace industry has also attracted foreign companies like Texas-based Firefly Aerospace. The company was purchased in 2017 by Max Polyakov, who opened a Firefly Aerospace research and development center in Dnipro the following year.

Ukraine’s space program also includes projects such as space debris removal missions and anti-asteroid protection systems.

It has successfully launched many satellites for communication, imaging and scientific purposes into orbit and is developing a new space launch vehicle, Cyclone-4M, based on Zenit and Tsyklon.

Edited by: Clare Roth

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Northrop Grumman Cargo Resupply Mission 17 https://stlouisrocketry.org/northrop-grumman-cargo-resupply-mission-17/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 15:06:31 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/northrop-grumman-cargo-resupply-mission-17/ February 21, 2022: Configuration of the International Space Station. Five spacecraft are stationed at the space station, including the SpaceX Crew Dragon; Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter; and the Russian Soyuz MS-19 and the Progress 79 and 80 supply ships. Installation of Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus spacecraft on the International Space Station is now complete. Cygnus […]]]>
February 21, 2022: Configuration of the International Space Station. Five spacecraft are stationed at the space station, including the SpaceX Crew Dragon; Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter; and the Russian Soyuz MS-19 and the Progress 79 and 80 supply ships.

Installation of Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus spacecraft on the International Space Station is now complete. Cygnus launched atop an Antares rocket at 12:40 p.m. EST on Saturday, February 19 from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. At approximately 4:44 a.m., the NASA astronaut Raja Chariwith NASA astronaut Kayla Baron as a backup, captured Cygnus, carrying 8,300 pounds of research, equipment, and scientific experiments to the International Space Station.

Highlights of space station research facilitated by this mission include:

  • a study which examines the effects of a drug on breast and prostate cancer cells
  • a new combustion plant
  • a Colgate-Palmolive investigation that will leverage the acceleration of skin aging in microgravity to help create and validate an engineered tissue model to serve as a platform to test potential products to protect aging skin
  • a demonstration of a secondary lithium-ion battery capable of safe and stable operation at extreme temperatures and in a vacuum environment
  • New hydrogen sensors which will be tested for the space station’s oxygen generation system
  • a system that will test hydroponics and aeroponics plant growth techniques and will allow scientists to observe root growth using video and still images

The results of these and other investigations aboard the space station will help keep astronauts healthy during long-duration space travel and demonstrate technologies for future human and robotic exploration missions as part of the Nasa. Moon and Mars efforts, including lunar missions through the agency Artemis program.

Cygnus will also provide critical hardware to be installed over the next ISS Deployment Solar Panel (IROSA) spacewalks, as well as other components for the proper functioning of astronaut life on the space station, such as a waste deployer and acoustic blankets for the waste management system.

This Cygnus mission is the first to feature enhanced capabilities that will allow the spacecraft to perform a reboost, using its engines to adjust the space station’s orbit as a standard service for NASA. The agency has a reboost planned while Cygnus is tethered to the orbital lab. A test of the maneuver was performed in 2018 during Cygnus’ ninth resupply mission.

Cygnus will remain on the space station until May before deploying CubeSats and then disposing of several thousand pounds of junk upon re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere, leading to its destruction.


Learn more about the station’s activities by following the space station blog, @space station and @ISS_Research on Twitter, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Get weekly video highlights on: http://jscfeatures.jsc.nasa.gov/videoupdate/

Get the latest news from NASA every week. Subscribe here: www.nasa.gov/subscribe

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End of Lockheed bid for Aerojet Rocketdyne could impact space and missile markets, experts say https://stlouisrocketry.org/end-of-lockheed-bid-for-aerojet-rocketdyne-could-impact-space-and-missile-markets-experts-say/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 17:34:31 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/end-of-lockheed-bid-for-aerojet-rocketdyne-could-impact-space-and-missile-markets-experts-say/ 1/5 Aerojet Rocketdyne tested an RS-25 engine for NASA’s Space Launch System moon rocket at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi in 2017. Photo courtesy of Aerojet Rocketdyne ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 15 (UPI) — Lockheed Martin, the largest US defense contractor, has dropped its bid to buy rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne, but experts said another […]]]>

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Aerojet Rocketdyne tested an RS-25 engine for NASA’s Space Launch System moon rocket at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi in 2017. Photo courtesy of Aerojet Rocketdyne

ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 15 (UPI) — Lockheed Martin, the largest US defense contractor, has dropped its bid to buy rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne, but experts said another suitor could emerge.

The Sacramento-based Aerojet has produced engines for the Space Shuttle, is working on engines for NASA’s upcoming moon rockets and is also developing hypersonic missile systems for the US military.

Lockheed said Monday it was abandoning the proposed merger because the Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit to block the deal over concerns that Maryland-based Lockheed could gain a stranglehold on production of missiles.

But the end of Lockheed’s bid doesn’t mean someone else won’t come along to buy Aerojet, according to Cynthia Cook, director of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington, DC-based think tank.

“It wouldn’t be surprising if Aerojet ended up being taken over by another company – the fact that they agreed to be taken over by Lockheed Martin indicates that they are open to this, even though they issued a statement saying that they would continue as an independent company,” Cook, who leads the center’s defense industry initiatives group, told UPI.

And although the Biden administration has signaled it will oppose anti-competitive consolidation in the defense industry, Lockheed and other contractors may soon seek other acquisition targets, she said. .

“It’s too early for us to know how the Biden administration will handle similar deals in the defense sector. We need a few more examples before we can draw any conclusions,” Cook said.

Aerojet Rocketdyne is best known for producing RS-25 rocket engines that powered the Space Shuttle, while it modified those for use on NASA’s new SLS moon rocket. The space agency is preparing to launch an uncrewed SLS this spring.

Aerojet is also working on engines for hypersonic missile systems, a niche where it has only one other US competitor, Virginia-based Northrop Grumman.

Lockheed CEO James Taiclet said in a statement on Monday that the purchase of Aerojet “would have benefited the entire industry through greater efficiency, greater speed and significant cost reductions for the American government”. But he said the company doesn’t want to file a federal lawsuit against the FTC.

The FTC had argued that buying Aerojet would have allowed Lockheed to cut off other contractors from critical components needed to build missiles.

“Without competitive pressure, Lockheed can raise the price the U.S. government must pay, while delivering lower quality and less innovation. We cannot afford to allow additional focus on markets critical to our security and our national defenses,” said Holly, director of the FTC’s Competition Bureau. Vedova said in a press release.

But trying to block Lockheed’s deal makes no sense if the government wants to see Aerojet Rocketdyne thrive, Marco Cáceres, space analyst for Virginia-based Teal Group, told UPI in an interview.

It’s important to recognize that Aerojet faces stiff competition for Elon Musk’s SpaceX rocket engines, many small launch vehicles and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin, Cáceres said.

SpaceX makes its own rocket engines, while Blue Origin is trying to develop a new engine for United Launch Alliance, which is jointly owned by Lockheed and Boeing.

These new space companies, however, have shown no interest in building missile engines, he noted.

“The only thing the government should do to promote competition and provide more diversity in terms of competitive launch is precisely to have authorized” the merger, he said.

“I think you stand to lose Boeing and Lockheed, two big historical companies in launch services, because they just can’t compete on price with SpaceX, they don’t have the reusable technology either,” said Caceres.

The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavor during a flyby of the orbiting laboratory that took place after it undocked from the space-facing port of the Harmony module on November 8. Photo courtesy of NASA

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Launch Facilities Agreement Signed by Rocket Factory Augsburg AG + South Australia Launch – SatNews https://stlouisrocketry.org/launch-facilities-agreement-signed-by-rocket-factory-augsburg-ag-south-australia-launch-satnews/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 23:58:26 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/launch-facilities-agreement-signed-by-rocket-factory-augsburg-ag-south-australia-launch-satnews/ Rocket Factory Augsburg AG (RFA) has joined forces with South launch, a South Australian rocket launch facility provider. This partnership allows the German launcher RFA ONE to be launched from Southern Launch’s Whalers Way Orbital Launch Complex in South Australia. Southern Launch’s orbital complex allows direct ascent to sun-synchronous and polar orbits. The agreement will […]]]>

Rocket Factory Augsburg AG (RFA) has joined forces with South launch, a South Australian rocket launch facility provider. This partnership allows the German launcher RFA ONE to be launched from Southern Launch’s Whalers Way Orbital Launch Complex in South Australia. Southern Launch’s orbital complex allows direct ascent to sun-synchronous and polar orbits.

The agreement will enable RFA to provide flexible, inexpensive and accurate launch services with its FRG ONE from a regional spaceport in the Asia-Pacific region. This small three-stage rocket, with its highly efficient staged combustion engine and orbital stage, can deliver up to 1,350 kg. 300km away. polar orbit.

The rocket is 30 meters high and 2 meters wide and has reached significant milestones in its development over the past year. The RFA ONE is expected to be launched up to fifty times a year in the future, delivering near-Earth orbit satellites quickly and reliably at a very competitive price.

The first engagement between RFA and Southern Launch took place at International Astronautical CongressWashington in 2019, and the parties are now very pleased to have finalized and signed a launch services agreement at the Global Space and Technology Convention in Singapore.

Jörn SpurmannCommercial Director of RFA, said: “Launching from South Australia allows us to offer our launch services in a very customer-focused way from a regional spaceport in the Asia-Pacific region. It marks a central milestone in our strategy for globally distributed launch capability. With various launch sites around the world, we minimize logistics and time constraints for our customers and lay the foundations of the infrastructure for a weekly launch cadence. Southern Launch offers a comprehensive and competitive service to launch our rockets. We couldn’t have asked for a better partner.”

Wet LloydCEO of Southern Launch, said:We are delighted to announce this partnership with Rocket Factory Augsburg AG, which will see its RFA ONE launch vehicle launched into space from Southern Launch sites in South Australia. This partnership once again demonstrates Australia’s world-class space launch capabilities to the international space industry.”

Rocket Factory Augsburg was founded in 2018 with a mission to dramatically reduce launch costs in the space industry. The company’s goal is to develop a prototype launch vehicle by the end of 2022, capable of launching satellites into low Earth orbit every week at unparalleled prices. The RFA ONE launcher combines three key competitive advantages: an extremely customer-focused service thanks to our orbital stage with precise delivery in orbit, at a very competitive price, made possible by our superior staged combustion technology, our industrial automation and our low cost structure.

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Britain’s moon-walking space spider will lead historic lunar mission https://stlouisrocketry.org/britains-moon-walking-space-spider-will-lead-historic-lunar-mission/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 12:47:52 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/britains-moon-walking-space-spider-will-lead-historic-lunar-mission/ A tiny space spider will carry Britain’s hopes of completing its first rover mission to the Moon this year. The private company Spacebit has built a 1.5 kilogram rover called Asagumo, a four-legged robot that will be able to “walk” on the lunar surface. It will be the first of three lunar missions the company […]]]>

A tiny space spider will carry Britain’s hopes of completing its first rover mission to the Moon this year.

The private company Spacebit has built a 1.5 kilogram rover called Asagumo, a four-legged robot that will be able to “walk” on the lunar surface.

It will be the first of three lunar missions the company hopes to launch this decade, including a “mother rover” with wheels and then a swarm of Asagumo robots that would explore the lunar lava caves.

“The first mission is a test and demonstration of technology,” said Pavlo Tanasyuk, founder of Spacebit. The National.

“The main objective of the first mission is to cover 10 meters, but we hope to cover at least 100 meters.

“Still, even 10 will mean mission successful. The surface phase of the first mission will last one lunar day – 14 Earth days.

The rover relies on a US-built spacecraft called Pilgrimbuilt by the private company Astrobotic, to land safely on the Moon.

The mission will be launched into space on United Launch Alliance‘s Vulcan Centaur rocket.

The launch has already been delayed once in 2021, and it is hoped that it will take place this year, but that will depend on whether the rocket is ready in time.

“There is a chance that our robot will survive the lunar night. In this case, the mission will be extended and the robot will travel a longer distance,” Tanasyuk said.

“That, however, also depends on the ability of Astrobotic’s lander to survive the lunar night.

One step closer to life on the Moon

“In our first Asagumo mission, we will transmit information via the lander. If the lander does not survive, we will not be able to know if our rover survived.

“Unlike the following missions where we will transmit and obtain information via our mother rover.”

The ultimate goal of the Asagumo rover missions is to explore the lunar lava caves formed by volcanic activity billions of years ago.

It is believed that these caves could eventually be used as a human base, sheltering humans from radiation, unstable temperatures and meteoroids.

Lava caves on the Moon are up to 1,000 meters deep and are much larger than those found on Earth, such as caves in Australia and Hawaii.

The Asagumo rover will use its temperature and radiation sensors and multispectral camera to measure charged particles, radiation doses and lunar surface temperatures.

“Thanks to Spacebit, the UK could become the first state to explore the lunar lava tubes and take a really significant step towards humanity living on the lunar surface,” Mr Tanasyuk said.

“Such projects, although carried out by private companies, build the image of the whole nation. And we are extremely proud and happy to be one of the pilots.

“We believe our example will help the UK space sector attract more investment, hire top young professionals and make the UK one of the world’s leading space economies.”

Britain’s booming space sector

Britain’s space sector is gaining momentum after the launch of a new national space strategy last year to position Britain as a leading space nation.

This includes investing an additional £1.4 billion ($1.88 billion) in developing new capabilities, as well as supporting space ventures.

Under the new strategy, the government plans to become the leading provider of small commercial satellite launches in Europe by 2030.

“As we enter an exciting new space age, we have bold ambitions for the UK to be at the forefront of this industry in our role as a scientific superpower,” said George Freeman, UK Science Minister. and innovation, when announcing the strategy. in 2021.

“Whether it’s launching the first satellite from UK soil or leading major international space missions to help tackle climate change.”

It is hoped that small satellites will be launched from a UK spaceport for the first time this year.

They would be carried into orbit from the Sutherland Vertical Launch Site in Scotland, aboard the Prime rocket being built by British start-up Orbex.

Next spaceports in Scotland — in pictures

Updated: February 1, 2022, 12:47 p.m.

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Astronomer Paul Feldman, pioneer of comet science, dies at 82 https://stlouisrocketry.org/astronomer-paul-feldman-pioneer-of-comet-science-dies-at-82/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 20:40:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/astronomer-paul-feldman-pioneer-of-comet-science-dies-at-82/ Through Rachel Valach / Published January 31, 2022 Astronomer Paul Feldman, a world authority on comets and a pioneer in the field of ultraviolet spectroscopy of comets, died at home on January 26, 2022. He was 82 years old. In addition to his pioneering contributions to cometary science, Feldman—professor emeritus in the Department of Physics […]]]>

Astronomer Paul Feldman, a world authority on comets and a pioneer in the field of ultraviolet spectroscopy of comets, died at home on January 26, 2022. He was 82 years old.

In addition to his pioneering contributions to cometary science, Feldman—professor emeritus in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and a professor at the Academy—made similar contributions to the fields of planetary and satellite atmospheres and astronomical instrumentation. He was principal investigator of a NASA-supported sounding rocket program and was responsible for more than 50 sounding rocket launches to study Earth’s upper atmosphere, auroras and airglow, atmospheres of comets and planets, spectra of hot stars and cosmic background radiation. He is largely responsible for Johns Hopkins’ reputation as a leader in solar system ultraviolet astrophysics and spectroscopy.

“Paul was a major presence in the Department for many decades and served with great efficiency and distinction as Department Manager during a critical period of growth and revitalization of the Department. He was truly one of a kind, and his leadership, wit and wisdom will be greatly missed,” said Timothy Heckman, professor and department chair.

Legend: Feldman, right, with Hopkins physicist Bill Fastie in their data reception area in Houston during the Apollo 17 mission in December 1972. Photo courtesy of Academy professor Richard Conn Henry, who was co -investigator of Fastie’s experience with Feldman.

Picture credit: Courtesy of Richard Conn Henry

Feldman’s program also developed the UVX experiment which flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia in January 1986. He served as a principal investigator for a program of comet studies, including Comet Halley in 1985-1986, using the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite observatory. He was a co-investigator on the team that developed the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope for FUV astronomy as part of the Astro payload that flew on the Space Shuttle in December 1990 and again in March 1995, and was an observer general with the Hubble Space Telescope and served on the Space Telescope Users Committee from 1992 to 1995. He was also a member of the FUSE Science Team and co-investigator on the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys, and a member of science teams from NASA for the Rosetta and LRO ultraviolet spectrometers. team and the Europa Clipper UVS team.

“Paul was on the ground floor of developing the instruments and analytical techniques used to understand the chemical and dynamic makeup of comets, planets and moons in our solar system, which he eagerly shared with all who entered. his office,” Stephan McCandliss said. , a professor-researcher in the department whom Feldman hired in 1988 to work on the sounding rocket program. “His expertise and enthusiasm for spectroscopy made him a key developer and knowledgeable user on dozens of U.S. and international space astronomy missions, where he could always be counted on for his wise mentorship, witty words ironic and his preparation for fine dining. But perhaps most importantly, working for him was easy and always interesting.”

Feldman’s work was notable for its broad breadth and depth, said Harold (Hal) Weaver, a research professor in the department, senior professional staff at Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and Feldman alumnus. Feldman first ventured into the realm of cometary science with an ultraviolet sounding rocket experiment to observe comet Kohoutek in 1974, and took inventory of the abundances of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon in the comet coma. For the rest of his career he was what Weaver describes as a “planetary archaeologist”, investigating the origin and evolution of our solar system.

In 1976, during a sounding rocket experiment to observe Comet West, Feldman made the first detection of the carbon monoxide molecule in a comet, recording what is still one of the best examples of cometary ultraviolet spectra. never got it, Weaver said. The amount of CO in cometary nuclei is essential for understanding their formation, conditions and evolutionary history. Since then, Feldman has remained at the forefront of attempts to study cometary CO, using sounding rockets, the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope, FUSE, and the Rosetta spacecraft.

In the field of planetary and satellite atmospheres, Feldman was an early leader in the remote sensing of Earth’s upper atmosphere by rocket-borne spectrometers, and his fundamental research on the radiation of Earth’s upper atmosphere eventually led to the emergence of the field known as “space weather,” said Darrell Strobel, a professor at the Academy and a research professor in the departments of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Physics and Astronomy, and one of the close collaborators of Feldman for 50 years.

Feldman also spent time researching Galilean satellites, being part of the team that discovered molecular oxygen atmospheres on Europa and Ganymede, polar auroras on Ganymede, and equatorial auroras on Io. More recently, he was part of the team that discovered fountains of carbonated water emanating from the surface of Europa, suggesting that there may be life under this moon’s thick shell of ice. His work with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope provided spectacular spectra of Jupiter’s daylight that are the definitive data for unraveling the fundamental processes that create Jupiter’s ultraviolet luminosity, and he led that telescope’s investigations of Mars and Venus. , with equally significant results.

Warren H. Moos, professor emeritus of the department, has worked with Feldman on numerous projects both formal and informal. “I’ve come to really appreciate him as a colleague for his fantastic scientific insight and his ability to sum things up and say them right,” Moos said.

At the same time, he has supervised dozens of doctoral dissertations, significantly shaping the next generation of researchers. “It takes that kind of commitment from professors like Paul for scientific research to flourish,” Weaver said.

Former student Kevin France, now an associate professor in the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado, says the fundamentals he learned from Feldman and McCandliss allowed him to follow any research questions that arise. pose in his current role. “I believe the most important lesson I learned from Paul is that if you take the time to learn the physics underlying astronomical spectra, you can essentially teach yourself to make a contribution to any field. astronomical,” France said.

France described a legendary milestone for Feldman students. Known as “the Talk” or “the Ride”, this usually happened while traveling to White Sands Missile Range to launch the student’s thesis rocket. When the student least expected it, Feldman suggested they return to Las Cruces together. “Forty-five minutes, no NPR, just you and Paul. Then Paul would review your graduate career up to this point, and politely but firmly tell you that it was soon time to wrap up your thesis and move on. to something else”, France mentioned. “I ended up completing Hopkins graduate program in 5.25 years because I knew after the Talk it was time to leave the nest!”

As a child, Brooklyn-born Feldman made hand-drawn star maps and was a member of the junior astronomy club at the Hayden Planetarium in New York. He graduated from Brooklyn Technical High School and earned a bachelor’s and doctorate (1964), both in physics, from Columbia University. He was an instructor at Columbia (1964-1965) and an EO Hulburt Fellow at the Naval Research Laboratory (1965-1967), and arrived at Hopkins in 1967, where he chaired the department from 1996 to 2002. He retired in 2010.

Feldman was a Fellow of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (1969-1974) and Fellow of the American Physical Society, and was a Fellow of the American Astronomical Society, American Geophysical Union, and International Astronomical Union. He was deputy editor of Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physicsand was a member of the editorial board of Icarus and the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration of the Council of Space Sciences of the National Academy of Sciences from 1985 to 1988.

Many years ago the department had a chamber music group where Feldman was the cellist. “I remember very well that Paul liked Beethoven’s Archduke Trio and didn’t like Mozart’s piano quartets. We all enjoyed Schumann’s Piano Quintet. Those were the good old days,” recalls Chia-Ling Chien, a professor in the department and one of two pianists in the group.

In addition to his scientific prowess and lasting impact on his fields, Feldman is remembered as a dedicated colleague and mentor whose enthusiasm and humor forged many friendships. Weaver recalled an anecdote illustrating this spirit: “During one of his trips from Denver to BWI, the flight attendant asked Paul if he had enjoyed his meal, to which he replied, ‘It is the second worst meal I have ever eaten in my life. . The worst was on the flight from Baltimore.'”

“The people who supported Paul when he was president weren’t just his staff; we became his friends,” said Pam Carmen, the department’s senior administrative coordinator. “He was the kind of guy who brought you into his family. Around this time we also became friends with his wife, Joan, we knew all about his daughters, Marian and Kathy, and got to experience the thrill that he felt at the birth of his grandchildren, which we all looked forward to. And I was honored to see Paul and Joan at my 50th birthday. It was a very busy Friday and I said goodbye to him at 5pm only to see them at my house when I got home. It was a surprise I’m shocked he was able to keep. This close relationship continues to this day. I felt so blessed to to be able to visit Paul and Joan shortly before he passed. I have a photo of that visit and I will always remember that day with a smile on my face.”

Feldman’s daughter, Marian, holds joint appointments in the Johns Hopkins Departments of Art History and Near Eastern Studies.

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SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launch aborted over cruise ship in hazardous area – WFTV https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-falcon-9-rocket-launch-aborted-over-cruise-ship-in-hazardous-area-wftv/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 23:22:26 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/spacex-falcon-9-rocket-launch-aborted-over-cruise-ship-in-hazardous-area-wftv/ KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — SpaceX called off its fourth attempt to launch a Falcon 9 rocket after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area at Cape Canaveral. 6:20 p.m. update: SpaceX paused its countdown at 33 seconds after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area that must be cleared for safety reasons. The Falcon […]]]>

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. — SpaceX called off its fourth attempt to launch a Falcon 9 rocket after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area at Cape Canaveral.

6:20 p.m. update:

SpaceX paused its countdown at 33 seconds after a cruise ship entered a dangerous area that must be cleared for safety reasons.

The Falcon 9 rocket is attempting to land at Kennedy Space Center and the areas around the launch and landing sight must be cleared for approval.

SpaceX will now go for a fifth launch attempt Monday at 6:11 p.m.

WATCH THE FULL SPACEX WEBSTREAM HERE:

Original report:

After several failed attempts due to weather issues, SpaceX is set to launch its Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday.

This will be SpaceX’s fourth attempt to launch an Italian satellite from Florida’s Space Coast.

READ: Weather delays SpaceX rocket launch from Florida space coast until Sunday

The company has been trying to send its Falcon 9 rocket since Thursday but kept pushing it back due to weather.

The launch is scheduled for 6:11 p.m. and the weather is 90% favorable for take-off.

WATCH: New report examines NASA’s future and mission safety

If the mission goes as planned, SpaceX aims to launch a second Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center.

SpaceX plans to launch another batch of Starlink satellites on Monday afternoon.

READ: NASA adds 3 more SpaceX crewed flights to the International Space Station

The company creates a constellation of satellites to provide high-speed Internet access around the world.

When these two launches take place, Channel 9 will broadcast them live and provide updates on Eyewitness News.

Click here to download the free WFTV news and weather apps, and Click here to watch the latest news on your Smart TV.

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