launch pad – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 14:51:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png launch pad – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 Pete Davidson and five paying customers will fly on Jeff Bezos’ suborbital rocket https://stlouisrocketry.org/pete-davidson-and-five-paying-customers-will-fly-on-jeff-bezos-suborbital-rocket/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:52:37 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/pete-davidson-and-five-paying-customers-will-fly-on-jeff-bezos-suborbital-rocket/ The company announced Monday morning that Davidson, the Saturday Night Live star who became a mainstay of entertainment intrigue amid his relationship with Kim Kardashian, will fly alongside five paying customers on the 60ft New Shepard rocket. tall from Blue Origin. The launch is scheduled for March 23 at 8:30 a.m. CT, according to Blue […]]]>
The company announced Monday morning that Davidson, the Saturday Night Live star who became a mainstay of entertainment intrigue amid his relationship with Kim Kardashian, will fly alongside five paying customers on the 60ft New Shepard rocket. tall from Blue Origin.
The launch is scheduled for March 23 at 8:30 a.m. CT, according to Blue Origin. The announcement comes after CNN confirmed earlier that Davidson was in talks with the company for a seat aboard its supersonic rocket, which launches vertically from a rural Texas launch pad on Bezos’ ranch.
After years of quiet development, Blue Origin’s space-touring rocket made its crewed debut last year with Bezos, flying alongside space community hero Wally Funk, her brother Mark Bezos and fellow space heroes. a paying customer.
Since then, Blue Origin has made headlines for piloting other well-known names on two subsequent flights, including Star Trek star William Shatner and Good Morning America host Michael Strahan.

Blue Origin’s goal is to make these suborbital spaceflights a mainstay of pop culture, providing a 10-minute supersonic ride to welcomed guests — who until now have been mostly celebrities — and anyone else who has the means.

Davidson will be joined on his flight by five paying customers. Among them, Marty Allen, an investor and the former CEO of a party supply store; Jim Kitchen, entrepreneur and business teacher; George Nield, a former associate director for the Office of Commercial Space Transportation of the Federal Aviation Administration; Marc Hagle, a Orlando real estate developer and his wife, Sharon Hagle, who founded a space-focused nonprofit.

The crew will spend a few days training at Blue Origin’s facility in West Texas before the day of the flight, when they board the New Shepard crew capsule that sits atop the rocket. After liftoff, the rocket will exceed the speed of sound and, near the top of its flight path, will detach from the capsule. As the rocket booster returns to Earth for a vertical landing, the crewed capsule will continue to climb higher into the atmosphere more than 60 miles above the surface where the blackness of space is visible and the Capsule windows will offer unobstructed views of Earth.

As the flight reaches its climax, passengers will experience a few minutes of weightlessness. Bezos notably spent his time in weightlessness bowling and turning around in the cabin. Others have been glued to the window.

As gravity begins to pull the capsule back to the ground, passengers will once again experience intense g-forces before sets of parachutes are deployed to slow the vehicle. It will then land at less than 20 miles per hour in the Texas desert.

Blue Origin's New Shepard takes off from the launch pad with 90-year-old Star Trek actor William Shatner and three other civilians on October 13, 2021 near Van Horn, Texas.

Because the flights are suborbital – meaning they don’t generate enough speed or take the right trajectory to avoid being immediately dragged down by Earth’s gravity – the whole show will only last about 10 minutes.

Blue Origin is the first company to offer scheduled suborbital space tourism flights. Its main competitor, Virgin Galactic, notably made its first crewed flight – which included founder Richard Branson – before Bezos flew last July. But Virgin Galactic has yet to follow up that flight with another crewed flight after it later became clear the company’s spaceplane had deviated from its designated flight path. The company now says it is undergoing independent technology upgrades and could resume flying later this year.

SpaceX is the only private company that offers orbital travel. The company conducted the first-ever all-civilian flight into orbit last September, taking a billionaire and three chosen crewmates on a three-day trip. And later this month, the company plans to take four paying customers on a flight to the International Space Station, which orbits about 200 miles above Earth.

Blue Origin plans to build a rocket powerful enough to reach orbit, called New Glenn. And, in light of the news that Russia can no longer sell rocket engines to the United States, those plans are more urgent than ever. The engines Blue Origin plans to use for New Glenn, the BE-4, will also be used on a future launch vehicle designed by United Launch Alliance, a joint venture between Lockheed Martin and Boeing that is responsible for major national security launches in the States. -United. ULA currently relies on Russian RD-180 engines.

Blue Origin did not have specific updates on BE-4 when contacted for comment.

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Rocket Report: Ariane 6 workers are “hyperstressed”, SpaceX retorts to Rogozine https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-report-ariane-6-workers-are-hyperstressed-spacex-retorts-to-rogozine/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 12:00:22 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-report-ariane-6-workers-are-hyperstressed-spacex-retorts-to-rogozine/ Enlarge / There are only five Ariane 5 rockets left before Europe switches to the Ariane 6 vehicle. Welcome to Rocket Report 4.35! No report next week. We are now one week away from the momentous deployment of the Space Launch System rocket for the first time on the launch pad. I will be taking […]]]>
Enlarge / There are only five Ariane 5 rockets left before Europe switches to the Ariane 6 vehicle.

Welcome to Rocket Report 4.35! No report next week. We are now one week away from the momentous deployment of the Space Launch System rocket for the first time on the launch pad. I will be taking spring break with my family next week, so there will be no newsletter, but I will be back in time to follow the deployment on Thursday evening, March 17th. Look for full coverage of Trevor Mahlmann and I on Ars Technica following Friday morning.

As always, we Reader Submissions Welcome, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please sign up using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP versions of the site). Each report will contain information on small, medium and heavy rockets as well as a quick overview of the next three launches on the schedule.

Voters Resolutely Reject Spaceport in Georgia. According to unofficial results, 72% of Camden County voters voted on Tuesday to halt the purchase of land for a spaceport in the US state of Georgia, First Coast News reports. This represents a stark (and possibly fatal) setback for the vertical-launch spaceport. The county spent $10.3 million on the project, which has been in the planning stages since 2012. Ahead of the vote, project supporters said the spaceport would create jobs and diversify the county’s economy.

A clear message … However, opponents have pointed out that the land is contaminated with industrial sites that have been housed there in the past, including a former rocket fuel facility. There were also concerns about rockets flying over the national coastline of Cumberland Island. Camden County Officials indicated they may fight that referendum in court, but the fight seems like a tough chore given overwhelming public sentiment against the bill. Beware, defenders of spaceports: make sure the local community is on your side. (submitted by Zapman987, EllPeaTea and Ken the Bin)

Diagnosed Rocket 3.3 second stage issues. Astra Space said on Monday it had identified two issues that led to a failed launch last month, SpaceNews reports. The company said it investigated the Feb. 10 failure of its Rocket 3.3 vehicle to reach orbit. The investigation determined that the root cause was an error in a wiring diagram of the payload shroud that prevented all of its separation mechanisms from firing. This problem prevented the fairing from separating until the upper stage of the rocket, which is encapsulated by the fairing, ignited its engine.

Back to the drawing board … “This harness was built and fitted to the vehicle exactly as specified by our procedures and the technical drawing,” said Andrew Griggs, Senior Director of Mission Management and Assurance at Astra. However, the drawing swapped two wire harness channels. A second issue with the February launch concerned the thrust vector control system on the upper stage. Astra said it fixed those flaws. According to filings, the company could attempt another launch as early as next week. To date, four of the company’s five orbital launch attempts have ended in failure. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

The easiest way to follow Eric Berger’s space reporting is to sign up for his newsletter, we’ll collect his stories for your inbox.

Iran launches second military satellite. Iran’s state news agency, IRNA, reported tuesday that the company had successfully launched its second military satellite into low Earth orbit. The Noor-2 satellite was placed into an orbit 500 km above Earth by a three-stage rocket named Qased. This rocket previously launched the Noor-1 satellites for the Revolutionary Guards’ aerospace wing in 2020.

Not for military purposes? … This feat came after the country struggled to successfully launch other small orbital rockets. Iran, which has long said it is not seeking nuclear weapons, has previously maintained that its satellite launches and rocket tests have no military component, Reports from Radio Free Europe. The launch adds urgency to negotiations between Western countries and Iran to revive a 2015 nuclear deal, the publication said. (submitted by Ken the Bin and EllPeaTea)

First launch from Cornwall to boost Welsh satellite. Virgin Orbit and European space manufacturing start-up Space Forge announced Wednesday they have reached an agreement to launch the first satellite developed in Wales in the summer of 2022. The ForgeStar satellite will be flown on LauncherOne as part of the effort to open the UK’s first national spaceport at Spaceport Cornwall in Newquay, Cornwall.

Several firsts … “We at Virgin Orbit are delighted to have been chosen to take Space Forge forward on its space journey as we look forward to our maiden launch in Cornwall,” Virgin Orbit CEO Dan Hart said in a statement. the press release. It would be the first-ever orbital launch from UK soil and the first time LauncherOne would be flown to an air launch location from a spaceport outside the US. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

German feminists launch rocket design on gender equality. A German feminist art group has revealed a concept for a vulva-shaped spaceship, Reports from the architecture magazine Dezeen. The WBF Aeronautics group encourages the European Space Agency to help realize this design to better represent humanity in space and “restore gender equality in the cosmos.” The group created the Vulva Spaceship concept to challenge the convention of, ahem, phallic spaceship design.

This is not the onion … “The project adds another dimension to the depiction of humanity in space and communicates to the world that everyone has a place in the universe, regardless of their genitals,” said the organization. Thanks to this optimized V-shape, the design ensures maximum energy efficiency, the artists said. For the project to be reviewed by the European Space Agency, 500,000 signatures are needed on the change.org website. Thursday afternoon, 663 people had signed. (submitted by HoboWhisperer)

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Kim seeks to extend launch pad amid concerns over ICBM firing https://stlouisrocketry.org/kim-seeks-to-extend-launch-pad-amid-concerns-over-icbm-firing/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 01:20:32 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/kim-seeks-to-extend-launch-pad-amid-concerns-over-icbm-firing/ North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his officials to expand a satellite launch facility to fire a variety of rockets By Associated Press HYUNG-JIN KIM March 11, 2022, 04:57 • 4 minute read Share on FacebookShare on TwitterEmail this article SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his […]]]>

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his officials to expand a satellite launch facility to fire a variety of rockets

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his officials to expand a satellite launch facility to fire a variety of rockets, state media reported Friday, as U.S. military and South Koreans concluded that the North was testing a new intercontinental ballistic missile. system.

Experts said earlier that North Korea may soon carry out a rocket launch carrying a satellite in violation of UN resolutions after recently carrying out a series of tests aimed at modernizing its missile arsenals and exerting more pressure on the Biden administration amid stalled diplomacy. Such a rocket launch by North Korea would be its biggest provocation since late 2017 and a violation of its self-imposed moratorium on long-range and nuclear testing.

North Korea’s neighbors detected two ballistic launches last week in the country’s first weapons fire in about a month. North Korea later said it was testing cameras and other systems to be installed on a spy satellite, but did not reveal which missiles or rockets it was using.

After analyzing those launches, the US and South Korean militaries said they had concluded that the North’s two recent missile launches involved an ICBM system under development that the North first unveiled at a military parade in October 2020.

“The purpose of these tests, which did not demonstrate the range of the ICBM, was likely to evaluate this new system before conducting a full-range test in the future, potentially disguised as a space launch,” said Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby in a statement Thursday. .

Kirby said the US military had ordered “enhanced readiness” among its ballistic missile defense forces in the region and stepped up surveillance activities off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula.

“The United States strongly condemns these launches, which constitute a brazen violation of several UN Security Council resolutions, unnecessarily increase tensions and risk destabilizing the security situation in the region,” Kirby said.

South Korea’s Defense Ministry issued a similar assessment on Friday and said North Korea should immediately end any actions that raise tensions and pose security concerns in the region.

According to a ministry statement, Seoul and Washington decided to release the information because they believe the international community should speak with one voice in opposing the North’s development of a new missile capability.

On Friday, North Korea’s Central News Agency reported that Kim inspected the Sohae satellite launch ground in the northwest and ordered officials to “upgrade it to an expansion base so that various rockets can be launched to carry multi-purpose satellites”.

“He stressed that it is the noble duty of our party and space scientists and technicians of our time to transform the launch pad, associated with our state’s great dream and ambition for space power, into a base state-of-the-art advancement,” KCNA said.

North Korea carried out two successful satellite launches from the Sohae facility in 2012 and 2016. It said they were Earth observation satellites developed under its peaceful space development program , but the UN is banning a North Korean satellite launch because it could serve as cover to test missile technology. .

Kim said earlier this week that North Korea needed reconnaissance satellites to monitor “US imperialism’s aggression troops and vassal forces.”

But some experts question the capability of North Korea’s spy satellites because it has not released high-resolution images among recent photos believed to have been taken from space. They also say there is no evidence that the two satellites launched in 2012 and 2016 ever transmitted images.

In 2017, North Korea conducted three ICBM launches that demonstrated a range that could include the American continent. Analysts say it lacks proficiency in a few remaining technologies, such as a re-entry vehicle, to have functional ICBMs that can carry nuclear warheads.

In 2018, North Korea unilaterally suspended long-range and nuclear testing before starting now dormant denuclearization talks with the United States. The talks broke down in 2019 due to disputes over US sanctions against the North. Senior Pyongyang officials recently hinted at the lifting of the 2018 weapons testing moratorium.

Observers say North Korea could conduct a spy satellite launch or ICBM test before its big political birthday in April – the 110th birthday of state founder Kim Il Sung, Kim Jong’s late grandfather One.

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Rocket Lab will build Neutron, a next-gen reusable booster, in Virginia https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-lab-will-build-neutron-a-next-gen-reusable-booster-in-virginia/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-lab-will-build-neutron-a-next-gen-reusable-booster-in-virginia/ rocket lab will build its next-generation Neutron launch vehicle on Wallops Island, Va., at a site adjacent to the company’s U.S. coastal launch pad. “Its position on the east coast is the perfect place to support both Neutron’s expected frequent launch cadence and the rocket’s return-to-Earth capability of landing at its launch site after liftoff,” […]]]>

rocket lab will build its next-generation Neutron launch vehicle on Wallops Island, Va., at a site adjacent to the company’s U.S. coastal launch pad.

“Its position on the east coast is the perfect place to support both Neutron’s expected frequent launch cadence and the rocket’s return-to-Earth capability of landing at its launch site after liftoff,” CEO Peter Beck said in a company announcement Feb. 2. 28.

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NASA is preparing for the deployment of the Artemis 1 mission next week https://stlouisrocketry.org/nasa-is-preparing-for-the-deployment-of-the-artemis-1-mission-next-week/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 23:16:47 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/nasa-is-preparing-for-the-deployment-of-the-artemis-1-mission-next-week/ Teams begin retracting the “kitchen drawer” platforms surrounding the first rocket that will launch a NASA Artemis mission to the moon. Retracting the platforms surrounding the massive Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida is a key step in safely sending the rocket and spacecraft to the launch pad […]]]>

Teams begin retracting the “kitchen drawer” platforms surrounding the first rocket that will launch a NASA Artemis mission to the moon.

Retracting the platforms surrounding the massive Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida is a key step in safely sending the rocket and spacecraft to the launch pad on March 17 before the launch of Artemis 1, which is expected to take place in May at the earliest.

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OneWeb satellites: Russia and UK face stalemate over rocket launch https://stlouisrocketry.org/oneweb-satellites-russia-and-uk-face-stalemate-over-rocket-launch/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 11:48:45 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/oneweb-satellites-russia-and-uk-face-stalemate-over-rocket-launch/ Satellites made by OneWeb, a company partly owned by the British government, are due to launch on a Russian Soyuz rocket on March 4, but Russia is threatening to cancel while the UK has been criticized for continuing after the invasion of Ukraine. Space out March 2, 2022 By Jonathan O’Callaghan A Soyuz rocket being […]]]>

Satellites made by OneWeb, a company partly owned by the British government, are due to launch on a Russian Soyuz rocket on March 4, but Russia is threatening to cancel while the UK has been criticized for continuing after the invasion of Ukraine.

Space out


March 2, 2022

A Soyuz rocket being prepared to launch OneWeb satellites, taken on March 2

RoscosmosTASS Press Office via Getty Images

Russia and the UK are at an impasse over a satellite launch. The satellites are owned by British company OneWeb, which is part-owned by the British government, and are to be launched on a Russian Soyuz rocket. The UK has been criticized for allowing the launch, while Russia has said it will not launch the satellites unless it receives guarantees that they will not be used for military purposes and unless that the British government gives up its share in OneWeb.

On Friday March 4 at 10:41 p.m. UK time, a batch of 36 OneWeb satellites are due to lift off on a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, operated by the Russian space agency Roscosmos. OneWeb already has more than 400 satellites in orbit, all launched on Soyuz rockets, as part of its space internet mega constellation. Five more launches are planned this year, also on Soyuz rockets, to complete the first stage of the constellation. The company was saved from bankruptcy in 2020 after a joint investment of $1 billion from the British government and Indian company Bharti Global.

In light of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, however, questions have been raised about whether the launch should go ahead. Other organizations have severed their ties with Russia, such as energy companies BP and Shell. Earlier this week, the European Space Agency said it was “highly unlikely” that its next Mars rover would launch on a Russian rocket as planned in September.

“Much like the request from BP and Shell, OneWeb should not continue to engage in business activities with Russian companies,” said Labor MP Darren Jones, chairman of the Business, Energy and Energy Committee. of the UK House of Commons Industrial Strategy. “Ministers should work with the OneWeb board to help achieve this outcome as soon as possible.”

Chris Lee, former chief scientist of the UK Space Agency, said it was a “difficult situation” for OneWeb. “If they make a business decision, I’m uncomfortable unless they explain it to the British taxpayer who was part of their bailout,” he said. “I would like them to explain their position, because we are in a way shareholders.”

So far, however, the launch appears to be moving forward. Roscosmos has been post pictures to twitter the deployment of the rocket, which is now vertical on the launch pad with the satellites on board. “We are on time” tweeted Dmitry Rogozin, the boss of Roscosmos.

However, speaking to the Russia-24 TV channel on March 2, Rogozin also said that the launch would not take place unless there are guarantees from OneWeb and the French company Arianespace, which organizes launches for OneWeb, as the satellites would not be used for military purposes. “If we don’t receive confirmation by March 4, the rocket will be pulled from launch,” he said. He added that the undisclosed sum of money paid by OneWeb for the launch, which had already been transferred in full, “would remain in Russia” regardless of the outcome. In a new escalation, Roscosmos tweeted that the launch will only go ahead if the UK government gives up its shares in OneWeb.

OneWeb has signed several military contracts previously, which means that Russia may be considering stopping the launch. “I’m not surprised if the comment is made in bad faith as OneWeb has a long history of pursuing military and commercial customers,” says Bledyn Bowen, a space policy expert at the University of Leicester, UK. “Rogozin knows it.” It is unclear whether Russia plans to keep the satellites if the launch is cancelled.

In response to the question of whether the launch should take place after global sanctions against Russia, a spokesman for the British government said: “It is right that questions are raised about future space cooperation with Russia at the following the illegal invasion of Ukraine. We are monitoring the situation closely and engaging with our partners regularly, keeping next steps under review. They did not respond to a request for comment on Rogozin’s latest ultimatum.

OneWeb did not respond to multiple requests for comment. However, speaking to the website SpaceNews earlier this week, Chris McLaughlin, Head of Government, Regulatory Affairs and Corporate Engagement, said that “so far it looks like we’re on the right track – but who knows?”

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Rocket Lab officially opens its third launch pad, with the first mission expected to launch within a week | Your money https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-lab-officially-opens-its-third-launch-pad-with-the-first-mission-expected-to-launch-within-a-week-your-money/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 13:02:29 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-lab-officially-opens-its-third-launch-pad-with-the-first-mission-expected-to-launch-within-a-week-your-money/ MAHIA PENINSULA, New Zealand–(BUSINESS WIRE)–February 23, 2022– Rocket Lab USA, Inc. (Nasdaq: RKLB ) (“Rocket Lab” or “the Company”), a global leader in launch and space systems, today announced the completion of its second orbital launch pad at Launch Complex 1 in New Zealand – the third platform Company launch for its Electron rocket – […]]]>

MAHIA PENINSULA, New Zealand–(BUSINESS WIRE)–February 23, 2022–

Rocket Lab USA, Inc. (Nasdaq: RKLB ) (“Rocket Lab” or “the Company”), a global leader in launch and space systems, today announced the completion of its second orbital launch pad at Launch Complex 1 in New Zealand – the third platform Company launch for its Electron rocket – and confirmed that the new pad’s first mission will be a dedicated commercial launch that is expected to lift off within a week.

This press release is multimedia. See the full version here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220223005596/en/

Rocket Lab 1 Launch Complex (Photo: Business Wire)

Pad B is based at Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1, the world’s first private orbital launch site, located in Mahia, New Zealand. The new platform is Rocket Lab’s third for the company’s Electron launch vehicle and joins the existing A-platform at Launch Complex 1 and a third launch pad at Rocket Lab Launch Complex 2 in Virginia, USA. United. With two operational platforms within the same launch complex, Rocket Lab doubles the launch capacity of its Electron launcher.

Launch Complex 1 Pad B will support the upcoming launch of an Electron mission dedicated to Japanese Earth imaging company Synspective. Liftoff is currently scheduled no earlier than February 28 UTC / March 1 NZT. Full details on the mission can be found here: www.rocketlabusa.com/missions/next-mission/

With two launch pads and private range assets at Launch Complex 1, simultaneous launch campaigns are now possible from the site. This enables resilient access to space by accommodating custom customer requirements or late spacecraft modifications while adhering to Rocket Lab’s manifesto schedule. Using two pads also eliminates pad recycling time, ensuring that a launchpad is always available for a quick-response mission. Launched from a private launch complex, Rocket Lab is also able to avoid the high scope fees and overhead typically associated with shared launch sites, resulting in a cost-effective launch service for operators. of satellites.

Rocket Lab Founder and CEO Peter Beck says, “A reliable launch vehicle is only part of the puzzle for unlocking access to space – operating multiple launch sites so we can launch when and where our customers need it is another crucial factor. We pride ourselves on providing responsive access to space for our customers, making back-to-back missions possible in hours or days, not weeks or months.

“Even with just one pad at Launch Complex 1, Electron quickly became the second most frequently launched US rocket each year. Now, with two pads at Launch Complex 1 and a third in Virginia, imagine what three pads on two continents can do for schedule control, flexibility, and rapid response for satellite operators worldwide.

More than 50 local construction workers and contractors participated in the development of Launch Complex 1 Pad B, which includes a 66-tonne launch pad and a 7.6-tonne reinforcement suitable for the Electron launcher. With Pad B operational, multiple roles are now available at Launch Complex 1 to support Rocket Lab’s increased launch cadence.

Rocket Lab – Launch Vice President Shaun D’Mello says, “With the Pad B, we kept things efficient. Its systems and layout replicate Pad A and share much of Pad A’s infrastructure, including the Electron Vehicle Integration Hangar, the track to the pad, and our own range control facility. Thanks to this, we were able to double our operational capacity – all on a concrete surface smaller than the average tennis court. I’m extremely proud of what the team has accomplished: building and bringing a second pad live, while continuing to maintain and operate pad A for our Electron launches to date, and in the midst of a global pandemic nothing less.

About Launch Complex 1

Located on New Zealand’s Mahia Peninsula, Launch Complex 1 is the world’s first and only private orbital launch site. As the launch site for Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket, Launch Complex 1 has supported the successful delivery of more than 100 satellites into space across a range of missions for environmental and marine monitoring, Earth observation , science and research, internet connectivity, technology research and development. , and national security.

An FAA-licensed spaceport, Launch Complex 1 is capable of supporting up to 120 launch opportunities each year. From the site, it is possible to achieve orbital inclinations ranging from sun-synchronous to 30 degrees, allowing a wide range of inclinations to serve the majority of the satellite industry’s missions in low Earth orbit.

Located in Launch Complex 1 are Rocket Lab’s private range control facilities, three satellite clean rooms, a launcher assembly hangar that can process multiple electrons for launch at a time, and administrative offices. Operating a private orbital launch site alongside its own lineup and mission control centers allows Rocket Lab to reduce overhead per mission, resulting in cost-effective launch service for operators of satellites.

Rocket Lab Images and video for download

www.rocketlabusa.com/about-us/updates/link-to-rocket-lab-imagery-and-video/

About Rocket Lab

Founded in 2006, Rocket Lab is an end-to-end space company with an established track record of mission success. We provide reliable launch services, spacecraft components, satellites and other spacecraft and in-orbit management solutions that make getting to space faster, easier and more affordable. Based in Long Beach, California, Rocket Lab designs and manufactures the small Electron orbital launch vehicle and Photon satellite platform and develops the 8-ton Neutron payload-class launch vehicle. Since its first orbital launch in January 2018, Rocket Lab’s Electron launch vehicle has become the second most frequently launched U.S. rocket each year and has delivered 109 satellites into orbit for private and public sector organizations, enabling national security, scientific research and space debris mitigation. , Earth observation, climate monitoring and communications. Rocket Lab’s Photon spacecraft platform has been selected to support NASA missions to the Moon and Mars, as well as the first private commercial mission to Venus. Rocket Lab has three launch pads at two launch sites, including two launch pads at a private orbital launch site in New Zealand, and a second launch site in Virginia, United States, which is expected to become operational. in 2022. To learn more, visit www.rocketlabusa.com.

Forward-looking statements

This press release may contain certain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. , as amended. . These forward-looking statements are based on Rocket Lab’s current expectations and beliefs regarding future developments and their potential effects. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties (many of which are beyond Rocket Lab’s control) or other assumptions that may cause actual results or performance to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statements. prospective. Many factors could cause actual future events to differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this press release, including risks related to the global COVID-19 pandemic; risks relating to government restrictions and lockdowns in New Zealand and other countries in which we operate that could delay or suspend our operations; delays and disruptions in expansion efforts; our reliance on a limited number of customers; the harsh and unpredictable space environment in which our products operate, which could adversely affect our launch vehicle and spacecraft; increased congestion due to the proliferation of constellations in low Earth orbit which could significantly increase the risk of potential collision with space debris or other spacecraft and limit or impede our launch flexibility and/or access to our own orbital slots ; increased competition in our industry due in part to rapid technological development and falling costs; technological changes in our industry that we may not be able to keep up with or that could make our services uncompetitive; evolution of average selling prices; the failure of our launch vehicles, satellites and components to perform as intended, either due to our design error in production or through no fault of ours; disruptions to the launch schedule; supply chain disruptions, product delays or failures; design and engineering flaws; launch failures; natural disasters and epidemics or pandemics; changes in government regulations, including with respect to trade and export restrictions, or in the status of our regulatory approvals or applications; or other events that require us to cancel or reschedule launches, including customers’ contractual rescheduling and termination rights; the risks that acquisitions will not be completed on time or at all or that they will not achieve the expected benefits and results; and other risks detailed from time to time in Rocket Lab’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), including under the heading “Risk Factors” in the prospectus dated October 7, 2021 relating to our registration statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-259757), which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Rule 424(b) on October 7, 2021 and elsewhere (including that impact of the COVID-19 pandemic may also exacerbate the risks are discussed there). There can be no assurance that future developments affecting Rocket Lab will be those anticipated by us. Except as required by law, Rocket Lab undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Show source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220223005596/en/

CONTACT: Rocket Lab Media Contact

Murielle Boulanger

media@rocketlabusa.com

+64 27 538 9040

KEYWORD: AUSTRALIA/OCEANIA NEW ZEALAND UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA CALIFORNIA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: AEROSPACE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY

SOURCE: Rocket Lab USA, Inc.

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

PUBLISHED: 02/23/2022 08:00 AM / DISK: 02/23/2022 08:02 AM

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As SpaceX awaits Texas launch approval, company sells 3 more flights to billionaire CEO – CBS Dallas/Fort Worth https://stlouisrocketry.org/as-spacex-awaits-texas-launch-approval-company-sells-3-more-flights-to-billionaire-ceo-cbs-dallas-fort-worth/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 15:07:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/as-spacex-awaits-texas-launch-approval-company-sells-3-more-flights-to-billionaire-ceo-cbs-dallas-fort-worth/ BOCA CHICA, Texas (CBSDFW.COM/CNN) – Billionaire CEO Jared Isaacman is buying three more flights with SpaceX, the first of which is slated for this year and could put Isaacman and SpaceX on track to travel deeper into space than any human has traveled in half a century. The first flight in the series of missions, […]]]>

BOCA CHICA, Texas (CBSDFW.COM/CNN) – Billionaire CEO Jared Isaacman is buying three more flights with SpaceX, the first of which is slated for this year and could put Isaacman and SpaceX on track to travel deeper into space than any human has traveled in half a century.

The first flight in the series of missions, called “Polaris” after the North Star, will last up to five days and include a crew of Isaacman and three others. The crew will perform a spacewalk, a first for anyone traveling aboard a SpaceX Dragon capsule. Isaacman made the announcement on NBC’s Today Show Monday morning and in an interview with The Washington Post.

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Isaacman, who gained international attention when he purchased SpaceX’s first all-touring flight dubbed “Inspiration 4,” said the first Dragon mission will be followed by a second Dragon mission shortly thereafter. These two missions will pave the way for the first-ever crewed mission on SpaceX’s next Starship rocket, the one Elon Musk hopes to one day carry to Mars. Isaacman didn’t share many details about those plans, except that during this series of missions he plans to travel to “deep space” – which is generally defined as areas of outer space. located on or beyond the moon.

It’s unclear if all of this will go as planned, nor has SpaceX said if it will need to perform additional testing before Isaacman can make his deep space trip. SpaceX also did not address any updates Crew Dragon will need to complete the mission safely. So far, the spacecraft has only carried astronauts on trips to low Earth orbit, or the area of ​​space directly surrounding Earth. The Inspiration 4 mission marked Crew Dragon’s highest flight so far, at an altitude of around 360 miles, and Monday’s announcement said the Polaris missions will go further than that.

It is unknown how much these missions will cost Isaacman. He also didn’t reveal how much he paid for the Inspiration 4 mission last year, though he said he paid less than $200 million.

The entire Inspiration 4 mission was billed as a fundraiser for St. Jude Children’s Hospital and raised a total of $243 million for the cause. Isaacman donated about $100 million, Musk invested another $50 million, and the rest was raised through public donations. Polaris missions should also support the same cause.

On the first Polaris mission, Isaacman will be joined by veteran Air Force fighter pilot Scott Poteet, SpaceX operations engineer Sarah Gillis and SpaceX engineer Anna Menon, who will serve as an onboard medic. Isaacman will be the only crew member with previous spaceflight experience.

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Spatialship

The timing of Isaacman’s ship flight is not entirely clear. During a Starship presentation in Texas last week, Musk said while he was hopeful the vehicle – which has so far only performed brief suborbital “jump tests” – would make its first flight test orbital this year, unmanned. That, however, could hinge on whether federal regulators give SpaceX approval to launch Starship out of South Texas, where the company has already set up an orbital launch pad and where the vast majority are located. Starship resources.

This could mean Isaacman surpasses the first billionaire who bought a Starship mission – Japanese fashion mogul Yusaku Maezawa. Maezawa paid SpaceX an undisclosed sum of money to secure a spot for himself and a group of performers on a Starship trip around the moon, hoping it could lift off as soon as 2023. Maezawa is still deciding who he’s going to take with him.

Musk also said during the presentation that he hopes Starship will cost less than $10 million per flight within a few years, which, if available, would be much cheaper than any other rocket on the market.

The ship is expected to be far more powerful than any rocket ever built by mankind. Musk said he would have twice the thrust of the Saturn V rockets that powered the moon landings of the last century.

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(© Copyright 2022 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All rights reserved. The CNN Wire™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia company contributed to this report.)

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Science News Roundup: Antarctica’s Fuel-Eating Microbes May Help Clean Up Plastic; The deployment of NASA’s new moon rocket to the launch pad has been delayed by at least a month and more https://stlouisrocketry.org/science-news-roundup-antarcticas-fuel-eating-microbes-may-help-clean-up-plastic-the-deployment-of-nasas-new-moon-rocket-to-the-launch-pad-has-been-delayed-by-at-least-a-month-and-more/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 20:57:48 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/science-news-roundup-antarcticas-fuel-eating-microbes-may-help-clean-up-plastic-the-deployment-of-nasas-new-moon-rocket-to-the-launch-pad-has-been-delayed-by-at-least-a-month-and-more/ Here is a summary of current scientific news. Damn it ! French brewers use algae to make blue beer A French brewer has started using seaweed with a natural pigment to make its beer blue. The beer, with the brand name “Line”, is the result of a merger between a company that wants to popularize […]]]>

Here is a summary of current scientific news.

Damn it ! French brewers use algae to make blue beer

A French brewer has started using seaweed with a natural pigment to make its beer blue. The beer, with the brand name “Line”, is the result of a merger between a company that wants to popularize seaweed as a dietary supplement, and a neighboring craft brewery that was looking for a way to make its drinks more distinctive. .

German researchers will breed pigs for human heart transplants this year

German scientists plan to clone and then breed genetically modified pigs this year to serve as heart donors for humans, based on a simpler version of a US-engineered animal used last month in the first pig transplant to man in the world. Eckhard Wolf, a scientist at the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) in Munich, said his team aimed to have the new species, modified from the Auckland Island race, ready for testing. transplantation by 2025.

Antarctica’s fuel-eating microbes may help clean up plastic

A team of Argentine scientists are using microorganisms native to Antarctica to clean up fuel and potentially plastic pollution in the pristine expanses of the white continent. The tiny microbes nibble at the waste, creating a natural cleanup system for pollution caused by diesel fuel that is used as a source of electricity and heat for research bases in frozen Antarctica.

Alzheimer-like changes found in brains of COVID patients; flu vaccine, safe mRNA booster together

Here is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19. They include research that deserves further study to corroborate the findings and that has not yet been certified by peer review. Alzheimer-like changes seen in the brains of patients with COVID-19

The deployment of NASA’s new moon rocket to the launch pad has been delayed for at least a month

The long-awaited deployment of NASA’s big new moon rocket to its launch pad in Florida for final testing before a first flight has been delayed by at least a month, until March at the earliest, the report said on Wednesday. US space agency. NASA, which late last year had targeted liftoff this month for its uncrewed Artemis 1 mission around the moon and back, declined to set a revised launch date, but the delay would prevent a flight before April.

Farmers test microbes to feed crops as climate pressure mounts and costs rise

Tech companies are raising hundreds of millions of dollars, including leaning on agricultural heavyweights like Bayer AG, to develop agricultural products that use living things like microbes and algae to feed crops and reduce the need for synthetic fertilizers. Microbes, including fungi and viruses, have been available for decades as treatments to protect plants from insects and disease, with mixed results. But developers are increasingly deploying them as natural ways to nurture crops while maintaining crop production levels.

(With agency contributions.)

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Having fun: Greenfield man experiences rocket launch for podcast – The Daily Reporter https://stlouisrocketry.org/having-fun-greenfield-man-experiences-rocket-launch-for-podcast-the-daily-reporter/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/having-fun-greenfield-man-experiences-rocket-launch-for-podcast-the-daily-reporter/ Chuck Fields took this photo of a January 13 rocket launch in Florida. Photo submitted Editor’s note: The Daily Reporter will feature our “neighbours” every month, whether it’s someone with an interesting hobby or profession, or a non-profit group that does a difference in our community. Here, Greenfield resident Chuck Fields shares his podcast and […]]]>

Chuck Fields took this photo of a January 13 rocket launch in Florida.

Photo submitted

Editor’s note: The Daily Reporter will feature our “neighbours” every month, whether it’s someone with an interesting hobby or profession, or a non-profit group that does a difference in our community. Here, Greenfield resident Chuck Fields shares his podcast and the opportunity to witness a rocket launch at Kennedy Space Center on Jan. 13 that put 105 small satellites into orbit. Fields, a Cincinnati native, has lived in Greenfield for 10 years. If you know a person or group you would like to see featured in Neighbours, email [email protected]

Daily Reporter: Tell us about your podcast.

Chuck Fields: I created my “Your Space Journey” podcast a few years ago. It’s actually a spinoff of my “Online Coffee Break” podcast that I started in 2018. I had such a tremendous response to my space episodes that I created “Your Space Journey” to focus about the incredible current events in space exploration and the incredible people leading us. I’ve had the chance to cover multiple launches, some up close and some from afar, including interviews with current astronauts from SpaceX’s latest crewed missions. The podcast is available on all popular podcast apps; more information is available at YourSpaceJourney.com.

DR: How did you become interested in space exploration?

CF: My interest in astronomy and space exploration started at the age of 12 when I received my first telescope for Christmas (in 1979). It was actually quite a difficult time for my family. We lost my sister Traci (16) to leukemia on Christmas Eve. I turned to astronomy and space exploration to help me grieve, but I also developed a great passion for it, which I still have to this day.

DR: Why were you invited to attend the launch of SpaceX Transporter 3 on January 13?

CF: I applied to attend several weeks ago, using my podcast credentials. It certainly doesn’t guarantee an invite, but in this case, two days before launch, I found out that my invite had been accepted. I happened to be in Florida at the time, so I took a two-hour jaunt to Kennedy Space Center (and luckily was able to take the day off to attend!).

DR: How was the experience?

CF: I had the wonderful pleasure of watching this incredible launch from the US Space Force station about three miles from where SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket was. This Transporter 3 mission carried 105 satellites and was the first launch from Cape Canaveral that landed the Booster ashore, in Landing Zone 1 just one mile from the launch pad.

It was the third time I had the chance to witness a make-up landing. Watching a rocket take off is almost indescribable, feeling the incredible sound rumble through your bones as you watch the rocket soar higher and higher. But then to see the booster come apart and watch it “fall in style,” as Buzz Lightyear would say, is just amazing. As if that weren’t enough, we were treated to a sonic boom as the booster approached the landing pad, slowing enough to break the sound barrier.

This booster – B1058, flew for the tenth time, the third such booster from SpaceX to do so. This was the second time I saw this booster fly. I last saw it for the Starlink L20 mission in March 2021. Historically, this booster is famous for first flying on SpaceX Demo2, the company’s first crewed mission, with Bob and Doug.

DR: What do you do with the photos and the experience?

I like to share the experience with others and, of course, I like to take good photos. It’s not easy to do! I had the chance to cover the launch of SpaceX Inspiration 4, the first all-civilian space mission last September. I had two remote cameras on the launchpad and neither got a decent photo. I’m also a part-time coding teacher, and for Inspiration 4 I was able to livestream the Kennedy Space Center launch to my class.

DR: What’s next for you and your podcast?

I’m lining up some new guests and subjects for Season 3 of “Your Space Journey,” and hope to be looking forward to covering a few more launches this year. I would really love to help spread the excitement with others and hopefully help encourage children and adults to believe that we have a bright future ahead of us. We just need to allow ourselves to dream, think positive, and enjoy the ride, even if it’s through a camera.

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