space launch – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 14:51:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://stlouisrocketry.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T144115.516-139x136.png space launch – St Louis Rocketry http://stlouisrocketry.org/ 32 32 Want to go into space? NASA’s Artemis I mission delivers the next best thing https://stlouisrocketry.org/want-to-go-into-space-nasas-artemis-i-mission-delivers-the-next-best-thing/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 21:32:12 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/want-to-go-into-space-nasas-artemis-i-mission-delivers-the-next-best-thing/ by: Heather Monahan, Nexstar Multimedia Cable Job : March 12, 2022 / 4:32 p.m. EST / Update: March 12, 2022 / 4:32 p.m. EST TAMPA, Florida (WFLA) – If you’ve ever wanted to launch into space, NASA offers what just might be the next best thing. The agency announced on Friday that it was accepting […]]]>

TAMPA, Florida (WFLA) – If you’ve ever wanted to launch into space, NASA offers what just might be the next best thing.

The agency announced on Friday that it was accepting names to fly around the moon on the next Artemis I mission. Artemis I is an uncrewed mission that will launch the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft into orbit . This will be the first flight test of the spacecraft and the rocket.

Once in space, the Orion spacecraft is put into orbit around the moon. And NASA is asking anyone interested to add their name to this trip.

A USB key will fly on board Artemis I and will carry all the names of those who register. All you have to do to add your name to the flash drive is visit the NASA website, enter your first and last name, and select a PIN. Once you do this, it automatically creates an account and generates a “boarding pass” for Artemis I.

Artemis I will take off from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It doesn’t have an official launch date yet, but NASA is taking a big step towards it later this month. The Orion spacecraft and the SLS rocket – the most powerful rocket in the world – deployment of the vehicle assembly building in Kennedy for the first time on March 17. It will then arrive at Launch Complex 39B on March 18, where it will undergo heavy inspections.

“This is a mission that’s really going to do what hasn’t been done and learn what isn’t known,” said Artemis I mission manager Mike Sarafin. on the next Orion flight, pushing the boundaries of the envelope to prepare for this mission.”

Artemis I is just the first of the Artemis missions that will land the first woman and the first person of color on the moon.

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Rocket Report: Ariane 6 workers are “hyperstressed”, SpaceX retorts to Rogozine https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-report-ariane-6-workers-are-hyperstressed-spacex-retorts-to-rogozine/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 12:00:22 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-report-ariane-6-workers-are-hyperstressed-spacex-retorts-to-rogozine/ Enlarge / There are only five Ariane 5 rockets left before Europe switches to the Ariane 6 vehicle. Welcome to Rocket Report 4.35! No report next week. We are now one week away from the momentous deployment of the Space Launch System rocket for the first time on the launch pad. I will be taking […]]]>
Enlarge / There are only five Ariane 5 rockets left before Europe switches to the Ariane 6 vehicle.

Welcome to Rocket Report 4.35! No report next week. We are now one week away from the momentous deployment of the Space Launch System rocket for the first time on the launch pad. I will be taking spring break with my family next week, so there will be no newsletter, but I will be back in time to follow the deployment on Thursday evening, March 17th. Look for full coverage of Trevor Mahlmann and I on Ars Technica following Friday morning.

As always, we Reader Submissions Welcome, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please sign up using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP versions of the site). Each report will contain information on small, medium and heavy rockets as well as a quick overview of the next three launches on the schedule.

Voters Resolutely Reject Spaceport in Georgia. According to unofficial results, 72% of Camden County voters voted on Tuesday to halt the purchase of land for a spaceport in the US state of Georgia, First Coast News reports. This represents a stark (and possibly fatal) setback for the vertical-launch spaceport. The county spent $10.3 million on the project, which has been in the planning stages since 2012. Ahead of the vote, project supporters said the spaceport would create jobs and diversify the county’s economy.

A clear message … However, opponents have pointed out that the land is contaminated with industrial sites that have been housed there in the past, including a former rocket fuel facility. There were also concerns about rockets flying over the national coastline of Cumberland Island. Camden County Officials indicated they may fight that referendum in court, but the fight seems like a tough chore given overwhelming public sentiment against the bill. Beware, defenders of spaceports: make sure the local community is on your side. (submitted by Zapman987, EllPeaTea and Ken the Bin)

Diagnosed Rocket 3.3 second stage issues. Astra Space said on Monday it had identified two issues that led to a failed launch last month, SpaceNews reports. The company said it investigated the Feb. 10 failure of its Rocket 3.3 vehicle to reach orbit. The investigation determined that the root cause was an error in a wiring diagram of the payload shroud that prevented all of its separation mechanisms from firing. This problem prevented the fairing from separating until the upper stage of the rocket, which is encapsulated by the fairing, ignited its engine.

Back to the drawing board … “This harness was built and fitted to the vehicle exactly as specified by our procedures and the technical drawing,” said Andrew Griggs, Senior Director of Mission Management and Assurance at Astra. However, the drawing swapped two wire harness channels. A second issue with the February launch concerned the thrust vector control system on the upper stage. Astra said it fixed those flaws. According to filings, the company could attempt another launch as early as next week. To date, four of the company’s five orbital launch attempts have ended in failure. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

The easiest way to follow Eric Berger’s space reporting is to sign up for his newsletter, we’ll collect his stories for your inbox.

Iran launches second military satellite. Iran’s state news agency, IRNA, reported tuesday that the company had successfully launched its second military satellite into low Earth orbit. The Noor-2 satellite was placed into an orbit 500 km above Earth by a three-stage rocket named Qased. This rocket previously launched the Noor-1 satellites for the Revolutionary Guards’ aerospace wing in 2020.

Not for military purposes? … This feat came after the country struggled to successfully launch other small orbital rockets. Iran, which has long said it is not seeking nuclear weapons, has previously maintained that its satellite launches and rocket tests have no military component, Reports from Radio Free Europe. The launch adds urgency to negotiations between Western countries and Iran to revive a 2015 nuclear deal, the publication said. (submitted by Ken the Bin and EllPeaTea)

First launch from Cornwall to boost Welsh satellite. Virgin Orbit and European space manufacturing start-up Space Forge announced Wednesday they have reached an agreement to launch the first satellite developed in Wales in the summer of 2022. The ForgeStar satellite will be flown on LauncherOne as part of the effort to open the UK’s first national spaceport at Spaceport Cornwall in Newquay, Cornwall.

Several firsts … “We at Virgin Orbit are delighted to have been chosen to take Space Forge forward on its space journey as we look forward to our maiden launch in Cornwall,” Virgin Orbit CEO Dan Hart said in a statement. the press release. It would be the first-ever orbital launch from UK soil and the first time LauncherOne would be flown to an air launch location from a spaceport outside the US. (submitted by Ken the Bin)

German feminists launch rocket design on gender equality. A German feminist art group has revealed a concept for a vulva-shaped spaceship, Reports from the architecture magazine Dezeen. The WBF Aeronautics group encourages the European Space Agency to help realize this design to better represent humanity in space and “restore gender equality in the cosmos.” The group created the Vulva Spaceship concept to challenge the convention of, ahem, phallic spaceship design.

This is not the onion … “The project adds another dimension to the depiction of humanity in space and communicates to the world that everyone has a place in the universe, regardless of their genitals,” said the organization. Thanks to this optimized V-shape, the design ensures maximum energy efficiency, the artists said. For the project to be reviewed by the European Space Agency, 500,000 signatures are needed on the change.org website. Thursday afternoon, 663 people had signed. (submitted by HoboWhisperer)

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Kim seeks to extend launch pad amid concerns over ICBM firing https://stlouisrocketry.org/kim-seeks-to-extend-launch-pad-amid-concerns-over-icbm-firing/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 01:20:32 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/kim-seeks-to-extend-launch-pad-amid-concerns-over-icbm-firing/ North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his officials to expand a satellite launch facility to fire a variety of rockets By Associated Press HYUNG-JIN KIM March 11, 2022, 04:57 • 4 minute read Share on FacebookShare on TwitterEmail this article SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his […]]]>

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his officials to expand a satellite launch facility to fire a variety of rockets

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has ordered his officials to expand a satellite launch facility to fire a variety of rockets, state media reported Friday, as U.S. military and South Koreans concluded that the North was testing a new intercontinental ballistic missile. system.

Experts said earlier that North Korea may soon carry out a rocket launch carrying a satellite in violation of UN resolutions after recently carrying out a series of tests aimed at modernizing its missile arsenals and exerting more pressure on the Biden administration amid stalled diplomacy. Such a rocket launch by North Korea would be its biggest provocation since late 2017 and a violation of its self-imposed moratorium on long-range and nuclear testing.

North Korea’s neighbors detected two ballistic launches last week in the country’s first weapons fire in about a month. North Korea later said it was testing cameras and other systems to be installed on a spy satellite, but did not reveal which missiles or rockets it was using.

After analyzing those launches, the US and South Korean militaries said they had concluded that the North’s two recent missile launches involved an ICBM system under development that the North first unveiled at a military parade in October 2020.

“The purpose of these tests, which did not demonstrate the range of the ICBM, was likely to evaluate this new system before conducting a full-range test in the future, potentially disguised as a space launch,” said Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby in a statement Thursday. .

Kirby said the US military had ordered “enhanced readiness” among its ballistic missile defense forces in the region and stepped up surveillance activities off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula.

“The United States strongly condemns these launches, which constitute a brazen violation of several UN Security Council resolutions, unnecessarily increase tensions and risk destabilizing the security situation in the region,” Kirby said.

South Korea’s Defense Ministry issued a similar assessment on Friday and said North Korea should immediately end any actions that raise tensions and pose security concerns in the region.

According to a ministry statement, Seoul and Washington decided to release the information because they believe the international community should speak with one voice in opposing the North’s development of a new missile capability.

On Friday, North Korea’s Central News Agency reported that Kim inspected the Sohae satellite launch ground in the northwest and ordered officials to “upgrade it to an expansion base so that various rockets can be launched to carry multi-purpose satellites”.

“He stressed that it is the noble duty of our party and space scientists and technicians of our time to transform the launch pad, associated with our state’s great dream and ambition for space power, into a base state-of-the-art advancement,” KCNA said.

North Korea carried out two successful satellite launches from the Sohae facility in 2012 and 2016. It said they were Earth observation satellites developed under its peaceful space development program , but the UN is banning a North Korean satellite launch because it could serve as cover to test missile technology. .

Kim said earlier this week that North Korea needed reconnaissance satellites to monitor “US imperialism’s aggression troops and vassal forces.”

But some experts question the capability of North Korea’s spy satellites because it has not released high-resolution images among recent photos believed to have been taken from space. They also say there is no evidence that the two satellites launched in 2012 and 2016 ever transmitted images.

In 2017, North Korea conducted three ICBM launches that demonstrated a range that could include the American continent. Analysts say it lacks proficiency in a few remaining technologies, such as a re-entry vehicle, to have functional ICBMs that can carry nuclear warheads.

In 2018, North Korea unilaterally suspended long-range and nuclear testing before starting now dormant denuclearization talks with the United States. The talks broke down in 2019 due to disputes over US sanctions against the North. Senior Pyongyang officials recently hinted at the lifting of the 2018 weapons testing moratorium.

Observers say North Korea could conduct a spy satellite launch or ICBM test before its big political birthday in April – the 110th birthday of state founder Kim Il Sung, Kim Jong’s late grandfather One.

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Rocket Lab will build Neutron, a next-gen reusable booster, in Virginia https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-lab-will-build-neutron-a-next-gen-reusable-booster-in-virginia/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/rocket-lab-will-build-neutron-a-next-gen-reusable-booster-in-virginia/ rocket lab will build its next-generation Neutron launch vehicle on Wallops Island, Va., at a site adjacent to the company’s U.S. coastal launch pad. “Its position on the east coast is the perfect place to support both Neutron’s expected frequent launch cadence and the rocket’s return-to-Earth capability of landing at its launch site after liftoff,” […]]]>

rocket lab will build its next-generation Neutron launch vehicle on Wallops Island, Va., at a site adjacent to the company’s U.S. coastal launch pad.

“Its position on the east coast is the perfect place to support both Neutron’s expected frequent launch cadence and the rocket’s return-to-Earth capability of landing at its launch site after liftoff,” CEO Peter Beck said in a company announcement Feb. 2. 28.

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NASA is preparing for the deployment of the Artemis 1 mission next week https://stlouisrocketry.org/nasa-is-preparing-for-the-deployment-of-the-artemis-1-mission-next-week/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 23:16:47 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/nasa-is-preparing-for-the-deployment-of-the-artemis-1-mission-next-week/ Teams begin retracting the “kitchen drawer” platforms surrounding the first rocket that will launch a NASA Artemis mission to the moon. Retracting the platforms surrounding the massive Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida is a key step in safely sending the rocket and spacecraft to the launch pad […]]]>

Teams begin retracting the “kitchen drawer” platforms surrounding the first rocket that will launch a NASA Artemis mission to the moon.

Retracting the platforms surrounding the massive Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida is a key step in safely sending the rocket and spacecraft to the launch pad on March 17 before the launch of Artemis 1, which is expected to take place in May at the earliest.

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The weather looks good for SpaceX’s next rocket launch in Florida https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-weather-looks-good-for-spacexs-next-rocket-launch-in-florida/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 17:31:57 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/the-weather-looks-good-for-spacexs-next-rocket-launch-in-florida/ Space is important to us, which is why we strive to provide you with the best coverage of industry and launches in Florida. Journalism like this takes time and resources. Please support him with a subscription here. — Space Force forecasters predict solidly favorable weather for SpaceX’s next launch on Tuesday, a mission that should […]]]>

Space is important to us, which is why we strive to provide you with the best coverage of industry and launches in Florida. Journalism like this takes time and resources. Please support him with a subscription here.

Space Force forecasters predict solidly favorable weather for SpaceX’s next launch on Tuesday, a mission that should boost another batch of Starlink internet satellites.

Forecasters say conditions at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station are expected to be 80% “one way” for a Falcon 9 rocket launch window that runs from 8:56 a.m. to 10:57 a.m. EST. Some cloud, however, may persist around Launch Complex 40 through Tuesday.

“A collision with a sea breeze from Monday evening through early Tuesday morning will cause downpours to move east over central Florida, and these downpours have the potential to linger into the launch window,” said Space Launch Delta 45 forecasters. said sunday. “The primary weather concern for Tuesday’s launch attempt is the cumulus rule.”

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Ukraine’s little-known space exploits | Science | In-depth science and technology reporting | DW https://stlouisrocketry.org/ukraines-little-known-space-exploits-science-in-depth-science-and-technology-reporting-dw/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 14:09:17 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/ukraines-little-known-space-exploits-science-in-depth-science-and-technology-reporting-dw/ Many space programs and rockets would probably not exist without the Ukrainian space industry. Ukraine has been a major player in the global space industry since the 1950s. Today it is one of the leading designers and manufacturers of space launchers, rocket engines, spacecraft and electronic components . One of the main space manufacturers in […]]]>

Many space programs and rockets would probably not exist without the Ukrainian space industry.

Ukraine has been a major player in the global space industry since the 1950s. Today it is one of the leading designers and manufacturers of space launchers, rocket engines, spacecraft and electronic components .

One of the main space manufacturers in Ukraine is the state-owned company Yuzhmashwho works closely with Yuzhnoye, a satellite and rocket designer based in Ukraine. Both companies were founded in the 1950s and depend on the State Space Agency of Ukraine (SSAU).

A key role on the global space scene

The European Space Agency’s (ESA) successful Vega family of rockets, which recently celebrated its 10th anniversaryhas a Ukrainian manufacturing rocket engine in its upper stage – the part that detaches from the rocket and then places the payload into the desired orbit.

The Vega launcher is used to launch small payloads, and a newer version, the Vega-C, is currently under development and is expected to launch later this year.

Another important rocket family designed by Yuzhnoye is the Zenit, which was intended to replace the obsolete Soviet-era Tsyklon and Soyuz rocket families. After 71 successful launches, the last flight of the Zenit family of rockets took off in December 2017.

The Soyuz family, since its first flight in the 1960s, has been the most widely used launcher in the world. After the Space Shuttle ended in 2011 and until SpaceX’s Falcon 9 mission in 2020, Soyuz rockets were the only launch vehicle approved to send astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS).

An Antares rocket carrying the Cygnus cargo ship to supply the International Space Station

The ISS is in constant need of new supply deliveries. For this, they use different spacecraft such as the SpaceX Dragon, the Russian Progress or the Cygnus, which is carried by an Antares launcher jointly developed by the American company Northrop Grumman and the Ukrainian Yuzhnoye.

Additionally, some parts of the rocket engine technology currently being developed by Rocket Factory Ausburg, a German start-up trying to build the world’s cheapest rocket, comes from Ukraine’s Yuzhmash, according to Golem.

Ukraine’s “Rocket City”

Both Yuzhnoye and Yuzhmash are headquartered in the city of Dnipro in southeastern Ukraine, nicknamed “Rocket City” after its space industry.

A map of Ukraine with some of its largest cities

Dnipro – also known as the “Rocket City” – is located in southeastern Ukraine

So far, no official attack has been reported in the city, but Reuters reported eyewitness video of an alleged explosion near Dnipro February 24.

Two days later, euro news reported that masses of Dnipro men and women were volunteering to join the fight. This was further confirmed by Al Jazeera Witnesseswhich reports that “people are scavenging food, water, clothing and even making Molotov cocktails to throw at tanks”.

During the Soviet era, Dnipro was one of the main centers of space, nuclear and military industries and played a crucial role in the development and manufacture of ballistic missiles for the USSR.

One of the most powerful intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) used during the Cold War was the R-36, which later became the basis for the Tsyklon launcher families. R-36 and Tsyklon were designed by Yuzhnoye and manufactured by Yuzhmash.

A view of an explosion, after Russian President Vladimir Putin authorized a military operation in eastern Ukraine, near Dnipro, Ukraine February 24, 2022

An eyewitness captured what appears to be an explosion near Dnipro on February 24

Dnipro’s famous aerospace industry has also attracted foreign companies like Texas-based Firefly Aerospace. The company was purchased in 2017 by Max Polyakov, who opened a Firefly Aerospace research and development center in Dnipro the following year.

Ukraine’s space program also includes projects such as space debris removal missions and anti-asteroid protection systems.

It has successfully launched many satellites for communication, imaging and scientific purposes into orbit and is developing a new space launch vehicle, Cyclone-4M, based on Zenit and Tsyklon.

Edited by: Clare Roth

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Powered by ‘aerobic’ magnetic fluid engines, China is determined to have a fleet of hypersonic aircraft by 2035 https://stlouisrocketry.org/powered-by-aerobic-magnetic-fluid-engines-china-is-determined-to-have-a-fleet-of-hypersonic-aircraft-by-2035/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 03:17:45 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/powered-by-aerobic-magnetic-fluid-engines-china-is-determined-to-have-a-fleet-of-hypersonic-aircraft-by-2035/ China would develop and test its hypersonic technology at an unprecedented rate. He claims to have added another engine to his arsenal that can propel him to the forefront of hypersonic racing. China’s hypersonic weapons program hopes to launch into the future with an ‘air-breathing’ magnetic fluid engine that could make it commercial possible get […]]]>

China would develop and test its hypersonic technology at an unprecedented rate. He claims to have added another engine to his arsenal that can propel him to the forefront of hypersonic racing.

China’s hypersonic weapons program hopes to launch into the future with an ‘air-breathing’ magnetic fluid engine that could make it commercial possible get anywhere on Earth in less than an hour.

By 2035, China intends to build a hypersonic passenger fleet that will use near-Earth orbit to travel to any destination in the world in less than an hour. Even though this program has been ridiculed by Western observers, China remains committed to developing an aircraft of this caliber and expanding the fleet more than a decade after a successful operation.

The program’s senior scientist said the super-quiet engine with no moving parts will also help build the next-generation launch vehicle, which is expected to significantly improve China’s space capability.

The “next generation launch vehicle” is likely to launch a crewed mission into space and could potentially make its first flight in 2026. An advanced engine powering it could prove to be a major space technology milestone for the communist nation.

A concept model for a next-generation launcher on display at Zhuhai Show, 2018-CASC

The experimental engine, according to Wei Baoxi, who has overseen several of China’s “milestone” hypersonic test flights, could significantly increase the vehicle’s flight efficiency and stability.

The motor, known as a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drive, apparently generates thrust from an electrically charged fluid that is forced through it by an electromagnetic force, and it is said to be used in tandem with the scramjet, another air-breathing engine, SCMP has been informed.

Magnetohydrodynamic drive - Wikipedia
Magnetohydrodynamic drive – Wikipedia

The MHD was designed to power nuclear submarines, but due to the low conductivity of salt water it was deemed unsuitable.

Air molecules on the surface of an aircraft traveling at five or more times the speed of sound, on the other hand, become electrically charged, making the futuristic engine’s ideal working environment.

The MHD engine has the potential to change near-Earth orbit flight and propel China to the forefront of aerospace racing, according to Wei, who is also deputy director of mixed-cycle engine development at Beijing Power. Machinery Research Institute.

“This technological revolution is a historic opportunity that China cannot afford to miss,” he said. “With a technological advantage, a solid industrial base and continuous innovation, China could take a unique path to develop new power systems for aerospace activities.”

China’s focus appears to be on viability and near-orbit travel, as a few weeks ago it also conducted a test flight for a new engine, which analysts say will power future hypersonic aircraft. and close to the country’s space, according to Chinese state media. — world times.

Chinese hypersonic dream engine

Winged hypersonic aircraft, according to Wei, will eventually replace regular rockets as the backbone of near-orbit transport. According to him, the MHD engine could increase the total efficiency of air-breathing spaceplanes by 10%, compared to scramjets, which suck in air and mix it with fuel to achieve combustion.

Wei and his research team wrote in a report published last month in the peer-reviewed Chinese journal “Aerospace China” that aerobic propulsion “would be the method that human beings should adopt to achieve high efficiency in moving between Earth and Space”. ”

A magnetohydrodynamic drive, also known as an MHD accelerator, is a method of propelling vehicles using only electric and magnetic fields, with no moving components, using magnetohydrodynamics to accelerate an electrically conductive propellant (liquid or gas). the fluid is directed backwards and like a reactionthe vehicle accelerates forward.

China is developing a hypersonic plane that can fly at 12,000 mph, looks like Boeing X-47C – TechEBlog
China is developing a hypersonic aircraft capable of flying at 12,000 MPH; it looks like the Boeing X-47C

The MHD drive, according to Wei, could help overcome many technological hurdles to make commercial hypersonic spaceflight a reality, SCMP said. Currently, as the Mach number increases, the thrust created by the aerobic engines decreases and the extremely high temperatures generated can damage the surface of the aircraft.

There is also the problem of unpredictable turbulence, which requires sophisticated and expensive flight control systems, as well as the requirement for reusable key components in a successful hypersonic space vehicle.

Due to its air-breathing capability, Chinese space scientists estimate that the hypersonic aircraft currently in development will be 10 times more efficient than a rocket that requires its own oxygen.

China’s reverse-engineered MHD engine could absorb energy from surrounding fast-moving hot air molecules to preserve the surface of the craft and extend its service life.

Some of the captured energy would be converted into electricity, which is used to power powerful plasma jets that aid in flight control. The rest is routed through an afterburner, which uses electromagnetic force to drive the exhaust to generate additional thrust.

To achieve maximum performance, the magnetic fluid engine, according to Wei, will need to be combined with other emerging technologies such as rapid cooling systems and detonation engines. Recent test flights have demonstrated that these technologies have a lot of potential, he said.

These efforts could be remarkable if the claims are confirmed, as China has relentlessly tested hypersonic capability on a war footing. On the other hand, the United States still struggles to manufacture a suitable hypersonic weapon, in part due to a view within American strategic circles that the country has a much larger number of powerful ballistic missiles capable of to inflict significant damage to opponents in any potential. future conflict.

Space launch with aerobic engine

China says it is working on a next-generation rocket that should become the main launch vehicle for the country’s future manned mission.

There are dangers in creating brand new technology, according to a Beijing-based space scientist who is not involved in Wei’s project. He said there is evidence China’s space authorities “don’t want to put all their eggs in one basket.”

In mid-February, two models of next-generation Chinese manned launch vehicles — a hypersonic aircraft and a more traditional two-stage reusable rocket — were unveiled, according to the scientist, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

When Wang Xiaojun, president of the Chinese Academy of Launcher Technology, floated the idea of ​​a launcher at an international online conference, it was criticized as a forgery. It appeared it would function as SpaceX’s reusable Starship, which has become the backbone of US space missions, according to social media users.

According to the Beijing scientist, SpaceX’s feat raised questions about whether China should follow suit, as some of China’s reusable rocket prototypes had already successfully vertically landed in test flights.

Chinese hypersonic aircraft
Image of what is believed to be a Chinese hypersonic aircraft. (CCTV screenshot)

While Chinese researchers aren’t abandoning reusable rocket technology, scientists say interest in air motor technology is growing. He points out that the fuel efficiency of a rocket engine is already low and that powered descents and soft landings consume even more energy.

However, in a more recent development, Science and Technology Daily declared that China’s next-generation manned launch vehicle could have a reusable first stage that can land vertically smoothly.

According to Wang Xiaojun, director of the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, which is part of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, the reusable first stage can perform engine deceleration during reentry and regulate and decelerate using pneumatic rudders. .

It’s indicative of an approach that doesn’t rely exclusively on air-breathing engines or reusable rockets. China’s investment in both types of technology could mean it intends to boost its hypersonic and conventional reusable launch capability, in tandem.

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Student rocket scientists win $10,000 pitch competition at UCF Technology Ventures Symposium https://stlouisrocketry.org/student-rocket-scientists-win-10000-pitch-competition-at-ucf-technology-ventures-symposium/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 21:05:31 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/student-rocket-scientists-win-10000-pitch-competition-at-ucf-technology-ventures-symposium/ Breakthrough rocket engine technology developed by students at a University of Central Florida engineering lab won a grand prize of $10,000 at the UCF Technology Ventures Symposium, a one-day virtual event on Feb. 17 bringing together Orlando’s innovators, entrepreneurs and investors. Hosted by UCF’s College of Engineering and Computer Science, UTVS 2022 was organized by […]]]>

Breakthrough rocket engine technology developed by students at a University of Central Florida engineering lab won a grand prize of $10,000 at the UCF Technology Ventures Symposium, a one-day virtual event on Feb. 17 bringing together Orlando’s innovators, entrepreneurs and investors.

Hosted by UCF’s College of Engineering and Computer Science, UTVS 2022 was organized by faculty, staff, and alumni from across the university. The day featured inspirational speakers, engaging panelists, specialist tracks to encourage networking and tech discovery, and a startup pitch competition with seven early-stage tech companies vying for the top prize.

Aerospace engineering graduate student Adam Kotler won the pitch with his company Halo Engines LLC, amid strong competitors eager to grow their businesses with products as diverse as high-tech, eco-friendly fabric, video surveillance powered by artificial intelligence and a social network. commerce based menu ordering application.

Kotler, co-founder of Halo Engines, touted his company’s rotary detonation rocket engine as the future of space vehicle engines. As a student, Kotler and business partner Robert Burke ’19 ’20MSalso a graduate student in aerospace engineering, worked with academic advisor Kareem Ahmed at UCF’s Propulsion and Energy Research Laboratory to develop the technology into solutions for the growing space launch industry.

“Our solutions will reduce development and launch costs for military and commercial customers,” says Kotler, who is currently working on master’s and doctorate degrees in aerospace engineering. “Halo unlocks next-generation burn cycles that will reduce propellant usage and simplify design architecture, resulting in lower costs and expanded mission and payload capabilities.”

This pitch impressed the judges from UTVS, a group of experienced Central Florida-based entrepreneurs and technology investors.

“Halo Engines gave a compelling and informative presentation,” says symposium organizer Benjamin Patz ’85MS, former UCF engineer and co-founding partner of DeepWork Capital. “Recent, never-before-seen results with the engine technology were key to the judges awarding the top prize to the Halo team amid fierce competition. We hope the team will continue to advance this unique technology.

Kotler says the $10,000 award will be used to retain expert contract writers to maximize Halo Engines’ potential to land multimillion-dollar awards for the Small Business Administration with the Phase I and Phase II proposals. .

Two additional early-stage startups – Soarce, a high-tech fabric company pitched by UCF students Mason Mincey and Derek Saltzman; and TumYum, a menu-ordering mobile app company pitched by UCF student Alexander Damis and entrepreneur Rafe Monteiro — both won awards. Their price includes access to the UTVS Mentorship Network: a group of successful local entrepreneurs and technology investors who help start-up entrepreneurs grow their business.

“Soarce presented an impassioned plea to reduce carbon impact with a revolutionary fiber-waste fabric with truly impressive properties,” says Patz. “TumYum captured the imaginations (and appetites) of the judges with a presentation that had real personality.”

Visit the UTVS website to learn about the full list of presenters for the 2022 symposium, including the keynote speaker Eric Singleton ’86, co-founder, Strax Networks; main speaker Kathleen Loftin ’89 ’00MS ’09PhD, chief technologist of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center; featured speaker Christina Drake ’07PhD, Founder/CEO, Kismet Technologies; and featured speaker Tommy ’00 ’02MS razorsFounder/CEO, NESTRE Health & Performance.

Visitors to the UTVS website are encouraged to return often as recorded presentations from the symposium will be added to the 2022 UTVS Video Hall of Fame in the days and weeks ahead.

Watch the UTVS promotional video to learn more about the UCF Technology Ventures Symposium.

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End of Lockheed bid for Aerojet Rocketdyne could impact space and missile markets, experts say https://stlouisrocketry.org/end-of-lockheed-bid-for-aerojet-rocketdyne-could-impact-space-and-missile-markets-experts-say/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 17:34:31 +0000 https://stlouisrocketry.org/end-of-lockheed-bid-for-aerojet-rocketdyne-could-impact-space-and-missile-markets-experts-say/ 1/5 Aerojet Rocketdyne tested an RS-25 engine for NASA’s Space Launch System moon rocket at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi in 2017. Photo courtesy of Aerojet Rocketdyne ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 15 (UPI) — Lockheed Martin, the largest US defense contractor, has dropped its bid to buy rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne, but experts said another […]]]>

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Aerojet Rocketdyne tested an RS-25 engine for NASA’s Space Launch System moon rocket at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi in 2017. Photo courtesy of Aerojet Rocketdyne

ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 15 (UPI) — Lockheed Martin, the largest US defense contractor, has dropped its bid to buy rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne, but experts said another suitor could emerge.

The Sacramento-based Aerojet has produced engines for the Space Shuttle, is working on engines for NASA’s upcoming moon rockets and is also developing hypersonic missile systems for the US military.

Lockheed said Monday it was abandoning the proposed merger because the Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit to block the deal over concerns that Maryland-based Lockheed could gain a stranglehold on production of missiles.

But the end of Lockheed’s bid doesn’t mean someone else won’t come along to buy Aerojet, according to Cynthia Cook, director of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington, DC-based think tank.

“It wouldn’t be surprising if Aerojet ended up being taken over by another company – the fact that they agreed to be taken over by Lockheed Martin indicates that they are open to this, even though they issued a statement saying that they would continue as an independent company,” Cook, who leads the center’s defense industry initiatives group, told UPI.

And although the Biden administration has signaled it will oppose anti-competitive consolidation in the defense industry, Lockheed and other contractors may soon seek other acquisition targets, she said. .

“It’s too early for us to know how the Biden administration will handle similar deals in the defense sector. We need a few more examples before we can draw any conclusions,” Cook said.

Aerojet Rocketdyne is best known for producing RS-25 rocket engines that powered the Space Shuttle, while it modified those for use on NASA’s new SLS moon rocket. The space agency is preparing to launch an uncrewed SLS this spring.

Aerojet is also working on engines for hypersonic missile systems, a niche where it has only one other US competitor, Virginia-based Northrop Grumman.

Lockheed CEO James Taiclet said in a statement on Monday that the purchase of Aerojet “would have benefited the entire industry through greater efficiency, greater speed and significant cost reductions for the American government”. But he said the company doesn’t want to file a federal lawsuit against the FTC.

The FTC had argued that buying Aerojet would have allowed Lockheed to cut off other contractors from critical components needed to build missiles.

“Without competitive pressure, Lockheed can raise the price the U.S. government must pay, while delivering lower quality and less innovation. We cannot afford to allow additional focus on markets critical to our security and our national defenses,” said Holly, director of the FTC’s Competition Bureau. Vedova said in a press release.

But trying to block Lockheed’s deal makes no sense if the government wants to see Aerojet Rocketdyne thrive, Marco Cáceres, space analyst for Virginia-based Teal Group, told UPI in an interview.

It’s important to recognize that Aerojet faces stiff competition for Elon Musk’s SpaceX rocket engines, many small launch vehicles and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin, Cáceres said.

SpaceX makes its own rocket engines, while Blue Origin is trying to develop a new engine for United Launch Alliance, which is jointly owned by Lockheed and Boeing.

These new space companies, however, have shown no interest in building missile engines, he noted.

“The only thing the government should do to promote competition and provide more diversity in terms of competitive launch is precisely to have authorized” the merger, he said.

“I think you stand to lose Boeing and Lockheed, two big historical companies in launch services, because they just can’t compete on price with SpaceX, they don’t have the reusable technology either,” said Caceres.

The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavor during a flyby of the orbiting laboratory that took place after it undocked from the space-facing port of the Harmony module on November 8. Photo courtesy of NASA

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